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Your most anticipated futures books

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Old Tuesday 19th November 2019, 13:53   #326
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Which one?
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Old Tuesday 19th November 2019, 14:57   #327
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The revised Australian Bird Guide (Menkhorst et al 2018**), which I got in Perth, WA (Boffins Bookshop) last month, is hugely improved over the very recent original edition, which rather goes to make your point. I'm unsure as to whether it is available in Europe, yet...
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**I was told that it first went on sale in 2019...
Could you elaborate on this, i.e. what has been improved, as it seems strange to bring out a hugely improved version of what was already an excellent book so soon after the initial publication? I hope they re-did the rosella plates at least! It would be too much to hope that they added the length of the birds to the new edition (a bizarre omission last time).
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Old Tuesday 19th November 2019, 20:36   #328
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Could you elaborate on this, i.e. what has been improved, as it seems strange to bring out a hugely improved version of what was already an excellent book so soon after the initial publication? I hope they re-did the rosella plates at least! It would be too much to hope that they added the length of the birds to the new edition (a bizarre omission last time).
It now has a solidly functional index. I have heard comment that a number of maps have been updated and a number of texts revised. Word of mouth is that additional splits have been included and many new taxonomic changes have been accommodated - I haven't done a direct comparison with the initial edition. Perhaps if you posted on the Australia sub-forum you could get Oz birders to go into detail on the changes? The rosella plates appear unchanged, but the headers to some texts do include tail lengths.
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Old Wednesday 20th November 2019, 09:31   #329
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The revised Australian Bird Guide (Menkhorst et al 2018**), which I got in Perth, WA (Boffins Bookshop) last month, is hugely improved over the very recent original edition, which rather goes to make your point. I'm unsure as to whether it is available in Europe, yet...
MJB
**I was told that it first went on sale in 2019...
I think this is poor form tbh, my copy is 2017 when it was first printed and you cannot tell me that all these changes were'nt anticipated to some degree?
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Old Wednesday 20th November 2019, 15:31   #330
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I think this is poor form tbh, my copy is 2017 when it was first printed and you cannot tell me that all these changes were'nt anticipated to some degree?
Andy, I've no idea of the back story on what caused a revised edition to be brought out so soon (Incidentally, I found a statement on line that stated that the first of the revised edition didn't appear until August 2019), but here's plausible scenario:

CSIRO is a government agency, and it may share the kind of accounting system that was prevalent in UK Ministries at least until recently. That required monies authorised for spending in Year X to be spent in year X and any shortfall would be reflected in reduced allocation for Year Y. If this were the case, then it is possible that those in charge of the department producing the book had to get the monies allotted to a printing contract spent, or the whole project could have been slowed down over several years.

If the original edition had therefore been prepared for publication in haste for reasons akin to that outlined above, that would explain the abortion of an index it had. Now, having secured the funding for year Y, loose ends could be tidied up and the more recent taxonomic aspects could be included, and so reduced funding for Year Z could be obtained to help keep track of all updates for very changed 2nd edition, perhaps in 10 years time, the budget line for the project over that period being hugely reduced. In turn this would enable a higher funding level to be put into long-term costings in Year Z + 10....

I spent some time over three years some time ago in smoothing out long-term costings so that politicians in office could not complain of being surprised, but the above is simply my speculation which arose because I couldn't find any explanation at all on the CSIRO website.
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Old Monday 25th November 2019, 09:35   #331
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Seems feasible MJB but not at all considerate to the buying public.
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Old Monday 2nd December 2019, 10:14   #332
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The Action Plan for Australian Lizards and Snakes 2017

a rather expensive book with an assessment of the conservation status of all Australian reptiles. Will be published soon at CSIRO

https://www.publish.csiro.au/book/7823/#contents
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Old Monday 2nd December 2019, 11:10   #333
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The Action Plan for Australian Lizards and Snakes 2017

a rather expensive book with an assessment of the conservation status of all Australian reptiles. Will be published soon at CSIRO

https://www.publish.csiro.au/book/7823/#contents
An updated Australian Frog book there too which is due for release soon.
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Old Saturday 7th December 2019, 19:06   #334
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The revised Australian Bird Guide (Menkhorst et al 2018**), which I got in Perth, WA (Boffins Bookshop) last month, is hugely improved over the very recent original edition, which rather goes to make your point. I'm unsure as to whether it is available in Europe, yet...
MJB
**I was told that it first went on sale in 2019...
Hello MJB

I have just ordered this revised Australian Bird Guide, Menkhorst et al from Fishpond and it will be shipped from Australia. They do not charge for shipping / delivery. Cost £29.97 with an estimated deleivery date of the 7th -15th January. I searched extensively on the internet to see if it was available in the UK / Europe / Closer, but was not available. I could find the previous 2017 edition, which preceded it.

Hope that is of some help to people ?

Kind regards, Carol

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Old Saturday 7th December 2019, 19:30   #335
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The Australian Bird Guide by Menkhorst et al is a definitive guide BUT is so bulky & unwieldy that it can't be classed as a field guide. Hence as I leave home for Australia, it's Morecombe's inferior but far more functional book that's going with me. Rather than a revised but still weighty tome what is needed is a pocketable guide (or guides), perhaps shorn of extreme rarities, that could function as a genuine field guide.
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Old Saturday 7th December 2019, 20:57   #336
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The Australian Bird Guide by Menkhorst et al is a definitive guide BUT is so bulky & unwieldy that it can't be classed as a field guide. Hence as I leave home for Australia, it's Morecombe's inferior but far more functional book that's going with me. Rather than a revised but still weighty tome what is needed is a pocketable guide (or guides), perhaps shorn of extreme rarities, that could function as a genuine field guide.
I could not find a weight, but size descriptions sounded like it is very similar to the old Pizzey and Knight field guide which is on my shelf and which I have used in the field. Given the number of species it has to cover, I consider that a reasonable size?

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Old Saturday 7th December 2019, 22:48   #337
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The golden rule of Oz field guides is that they have to be an unorthodox size- big and bulky like the Aus Bird Guide and Pizzey and Knight or too wide like Day and Plant and Morecombe; the only ones that are a nice size for field use are the venerable Slater and the field edition of Morecombe.
I have not yet seen the new edition of the ABG- I wonder if they now have Hornbill Friarbird included, and have body size measurements not that absurd wingspan business they so unwisely adopted?
Two unrelated topics- I saw both versions of the new Mongolia Field Guide and Gomboo's version from Helm is the better, with better brighter plates and a more progressive taxonomy
My long awaited Birds of Paradise and Bowerbirds is imminent also, I now have an advance copy......
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 14:10   #338
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The golden rule of Oz field guides is that they have to be an unorthodox size- big and bulky like the Aus Bird Guide and Pizzey and Knight or too wide like Day and Plant and Morecombe; the only ones that are a nice size for field use are the venerable Slater and the field edition of Morecombe.
I have not yet seen the new edition of the ABG- I wonder if they now have Hornbill Friarbird included, and have body size measurements not that absurd wingspan business they so unwisely adopted?
Two unrelated topics- I saw both versions of the new Mongolia Field Guide and Gomboo's version from Helm is the better, with better brighter plates and a more progressive taxonomy
My long awaited Birds of Paradise and Bowerbirds is imminent also, I now have an advance copy......
Hornbill Friarbird isn't mentioned, unfortunately. For the moment, I can't recall which taxon is involved...

Body size measurements seem occasional, so probably little change there.

I did see Fawn-breasted Bowerbird at Lockhardt...

By the way, did you have a tour group starting from Cairns on 31 October? It only occurred to us that the group who were at the gassy area just past the north end of the Esplanade were hurrying off because their tour leader, Philip, was waiting for them? If so, we missed each other by less than 100 metres!
MJB
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 14:17   #339
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There is an exhibition in Torroella de Montgri from November 2019 to April 2020 titled Tots els ocells i mamífers del món. 30 anys de Lynx Edicions on the 30th anniversary of Lynx Edicions.

There is also a special publication on this exhibition (in Spanish)

https://www.lynxeds.com/product/tots...leg-exposicio/

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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 15:43   #340
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………..
There is also a special publication on this exhibition (in Spanish)

https://www.lynxeds.com/product/tots...leg-exposicio/
That is actually in Catalan, not in Spanish. Lynx is really (and rightfully) trying to do justice to their local language.

The English description on the Lynx website also mentions the initial criticism Lynx had to overcome: "It describes the adversities experienced in the early years by the three founders, Ramon Mascort, Josep del Hoyo and Jordi Sargatal, and how they guided the work to a successful conclusion." After 30 years, there are certainly many who never read about the beginnings. I hope the publication will come out in English as well. To me, the story of Lynx is a great example of what can be achieved when a few people join who have a strong vision. And Barcelona has definitely gained in reputation as well. Who would have thought that such a feat could be accomplished by relatively "unknowns" in a country that was more known for cruelty to animals.
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 15:53   #341
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Hornbill Friarbird isn't mentioned, unfortunately. For the moment, I can't recall which taxon is involved...

.......................MJB
Apparently a subspecies or close relative to the Helmeted Friarbird. Lives on the York Peninsula. In my first edition of the book, it is pictured on page 409 as ssp yorki.
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 17:27   #342
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Apparently a subspecies or close relative to the Helmeted Friarbird. Lives on the York Peninsula. In my first edition of the book, it is pictured on page 409 as ssp yorki.
Thank you Robert for refreshing my memory! However, IOC9.2 lumps in buceroides, which is not present in Australia, and so I think that IOC may need to do a rethink, since the revised Australian Bird Guide does indeed indicate yorki as occupying the Australian east coast from Rockhampton north. Certainly above Cooktown, people call the Helmeted taxon 'Hornbill Friarbird'...
MJB
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 17:46   #343
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Hornbill Friarbird is now split by the IOC according to my Scythebill programme though it notes 'species status may be dubious and awaits results of new studies in progress. May be enedemic NE Australian species or more likely conspecific with New Guinea / Helmeted Friarbird complex.'
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 19:48   #344
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.....the only ones that are a nice size for field use are the venerable Slater and the field edition of Morecombe.

My long awaited Birds of Paradise and Bowerbirds is imminent also, I now have an advance copy......
I've opted to bring field edition of Morecombe with me on my visit as, whilst the illustrations are a disappointment, at least I can carry the thing in the field! I really can't understand why they're not bringing out a field version of the Aus guide - it must be possible.

Really looking forward to seeing your BoP book next week as I know what a labour of love it's been.
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 22:10   #345
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All very confusing, IOC split Hornbill Friarbird some years back, and the ABG says it follows IOC taxonomy, which in this case it does not. "Helmeted Friarbird" badly needs splitting up, the NT birds are clearly different and of two distinct taxa, and this Cape York taxon is pretty distinctive too, make sure you see it when in FNQ.
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Old Sunday 8th December 2019, 22:12   #346
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Hornbill Friarbird isn't mentioned, unfortunately. For the moment, I can't recall which taxon is involved...

Body size measurements seem occasional, so probably little change there.

I did see Fawn-breasted Bowerbird at Lockhardt...

By the way, did you have a tour group starting from Cairns on 31 October? It only occurred to us that the group who were at the gassy area just past the north end of the Esplanade were hurrying off because their tour leader, Philip, was waiting for them? If so, we missed each other by less than 100 metres!
MJB
Not me, I was en route to Madagascar. Glad you saw Fawn-breasted Bowerbird
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Old Monday 9th December 2019, 20:22   #347
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Hornbill Friarbird is now split by the IOC according to my Scythebill programme though it notes 'species status may be dubious and awaits results of new studies in progress. May be enedemic NE Australian species or more likely conspecific with New Guinea / Helmeted Friarbird complex.'
Thanks for that, Andy!
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