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One for Nutcracker?

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Old Tuesday 14th January 2020, 10:16   #1
KenM
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One for Nutcracker?

Nutty Hi, I wonder if you can name this tree of relevance in as much as, over the years visiting Fuerteventura this tree tends to punch above it's weight regarding attracting Warbler species (hoping there's enough detail in the limbs and leaves?). On one occasion late December '19, two Blackcaps, a Yellow-Browed Warbler and several Chiffies were present as has also been the case ''mostly'' on previous visits.

Another question regarding the Chiffchaff species that are present during this period, according to lit. Canary Island Chiffchaff doesn't occur on the Eastern Islands of FTV and Lanzarote, thus any visiting Chiffchaff at this time would be from Eurasia.

The images of the Chiffchaffs supplied looked odd (more so in certain lights than other), the pale yellow wash to vent and chest light dependant went from pale yellow to an almost rich buff yellow ''sandwiching'' the white body! Seen lots of Chiffies over the years...but not one looking like a tricolour from underneath.....dunno?

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Old Tuesday 14th January 2020, 11:34   #2
Simon Wates
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Ficus benjamina was my first thought for the tree. Can't get beyond Common Chiffchaff except for that nice YBW of course.
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Old Tuesday 14th January 2020, 12:08   #3
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Ficus benjamina was my first thought for the tree. Can't get beyond Common Chiffchaff except for that nice YBW of course.
Yes thanks Simon, there was a familiarity with the leaf, but seeing a fully mature tree perhaps 8-10 metres high (quite unlike how one sees them in the UK in nurseries and lounges) takes them off the recognition scale.
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Old Tuesday 14th January 2020, 12:23   #4
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Yep, agree Ficus benjamina; it appears to have quite a lot of whitefly (aphids) on it, which is likely what's attracting the birds.
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Old Tuesday 14th January 2020, 12:50   #5
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Yep, agree Ficus benjamina; it appears to have quite a lot of whitefly (aphids) on it, which is likely what's attracting the birds.
How do they thrive here, as far as I remember from my distastous attempt to keep one at home, they don't like direct sunlight? They need daylight but not sunlight, no daylight, leaves fall off, direct sunlight, leaves fall off.................
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Old Tuesday 14th January 2020, 14:10   #6
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How do they thrive here, as far as I remember from my distastous attempt to keep one at home, they don't like direct sunlight? They need daylight but not sunlight, no daylight, leaves fall off, direct sunlight, leaves fall off.................
What they don't like is sudden changes in their environment - buy one from a shady shop and put it in direct sun, and it gets sunburn. Do a slow increase in sunlight, and they'll adapt to it OK
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Old Thursday 16th January 2020, 21:26   #7
Joern Lehmhus
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Nutcracker, why Ficus benjamina and not Ficus microcarpa?
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Old Thursday 16th January 2020, 23:54   #8
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Nutcracker, why Ficus benjamina and not Ficus microcarpa?
Different species! What applies to one may not apply to another. Why does Iceland Gull like it cold, while some of its close relatives like it hot?

There's about 850 species in the genus Ficus, they cover a very wide range of tolerances and preferences!
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 01:39   #9
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Nutcracker, why Ficus benjamina and not Ficus microcarpa?
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Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
Different species! What applies to one may not apply to another. Why does Iceland Gull like it cold, while some of its close relatives like it hot?

There's about 850 species in the genus Ficus, they cover a very wide range of tolerances and preferences!
Was Joern asking about the comment on the tendency to drop leaves or asking for details of the identification process?

I would have said the leaf shape on the photos looks more microcarpa than benjamina - the apex of the leaf is not as sharply pointed and the fringes are not sinuate.
I'm not great at tree ID, but I've been surveying trees in Hong Kong parks recently, where both species are present, so ID tips would be useful.
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 10:46   #10
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Was Joern asking about the comment on the tendency to drop leaves or asking for details of the identification process?

I would have said the leaf shape on the photos looks more microcarpa than benjamina - the apex of the leaf is not as sharply pointed and the fringes are not sinuate.
I'm not great at tree ID, but I've been surveying trees in Hong Kong parks recently, where both species are present, so ID tips would be useful.
I meant species identification!!!
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 14:16   #11
Simon Wates
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Nutcracker, why Ficus benjamina and not Ficus microcarpa?
It could be microcarpa, I've spent hours pruning both - and can't make my mind up with these photos. 1st impression was benjamina and now its mentioned microcarpa seems good. Both are commonly used in the Canaries - not so much here in the Algarve. F. benjamina does develop thicker, less flimsy and larger leaves in mature outdoor specimens. To answer Andy's question; outdoors, in a coastal Med type climate benjamina does very well in full sun with a good deep root run - best in half day shade though.
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 19:03   #12
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After looking at the photos i thought Ficus microcarpa due to leaf shape and structure and also fruit coloration, but I could be wrong. So I asked Nutcracker what he uses to distinguish between the two species.
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 21:45   #13
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Any more photos of the tree Ken? Ficus over Phylloscopus in this case
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Old Saturday 18th January 2020, 18:04   #14
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Any more photos of the tree Ken? Ficus over Phylloscopus in this case
Apologies for the delay Simon! Unfortunately have deleted most of the other pertaining images

Hopefully these might help? (trees either side of the church) were the offenders.
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Old Saturday 18th January 2020, 21:19   #15
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I would have said the leaf shape on the photos looks more microcarpa than benjamina - the apex of the leaf is not as sharply pointed and the fringes are not sinuate.
I think you are spot on, sorry for inducing doubt - based on a whim. In my defence, both are planted in the Canaries and can look quite similar at a distance. Close up, they are easy to tell apart but the original photos left me doubting.

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Apologies for the delay Simon! Unfortunately have deleted most of the other pertaining images

Hopefully these might help? (trees either side of the church) were the offenders.
Thanks Ken!

Now I'm convinced that this is Ficus microcarpa, pending other opinions

Last edited by Simon Wates : Sunday 19th January 2020 at 00:35. Reason: typo - and mixing macrophylla - must have been the Chiffchaff!
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Old Sunday 19th January 2020, 00:21   #16
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Yep, agree - it doesn't show the 'drip tip' typical of Ficus benjamina
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Old Sunday 19th January 2020, 11:11   #17
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Yep, agree - it doesn't show the 'drip tip' typical of Ficus benjamina
yes, with these new pics a clear, obvious microcarpa
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Old Sunday 19th January 2020, 12:24   #18
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Thanks for the input guys.
It's reassuring that I've been looking at the right feature (I love the phrase 'drip tip'). I struggled with separation of these two similar species when I started tree surveys a few months ago (part of a project on fruit bats) and was worried I'd been getting them wrong.
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Old Sunday 19th January 2020, 18:59   #19
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(I love the phrase 'drip tip')
A common feature of many rainforest trees, an adaptation to shed water more effectively

Ficus religiosa is probably the best-known (most often cited) species with prominent drip tips:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...ramba_(57).jpg
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Old Sunday 19th January 2020, 21:39   #20
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Nice one Michael - definitely not a tip from a drip.....honestly!
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