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Scrubwrens & Mouse-warblers

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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 12:21   #1
Daniel Philippe
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Scrubwrens & Mouse-warblers

Norman J.A., Christidis L. & Schodde R., in press. Ecological and evolutionary diversification in the Australo-Papuan scrubwrens (Sericornis) and mouse-warblers (Crateroscelis), with a revision of the subfamily Sericornithinae (Aves: Passeriformes: Acanthizidae). Org. Divers. Evol.

Abstract
Understanding how the complex geotectonic and climatic history of the Australo-Papuan region has promoted the ecological and evolutionary diversification of its avifauna remains a challenge. Outstanding questions relate to the nature and timing of biogeographical connections between Australia and the emerging island of New Guinea and the mechanisms by which distinctive altitudinal replacement sequences have evolved amongst congeneric species in montane New Guinea. Here, we combine analyses of phylogenetic and eco-morphological data to investigate ecological and evolutionary patterns of diversification in the largely mesic-adapted Australo-Papuan scrubwrens (Sericornis) and mouse-warblers (Crateroscelis). We find evidence of ecological convergence and present a revised taxonomic and systematic treatment of the subfamily integrating information from new (ND2) and existing molecular phylogenetic reconstructions. Biogeographical connections indicate at least three phases of faunal interchange between Australia and New Guinea commencing in the mid to late Miocene. We also find little support for the proposed time dependency of ecological sorting mechanisms linked to divergence in foraging niche amongst altitudinal replacements. Instead, physiological adaptations to hypoxia and increased thermal efficiency at higher altitudes may better account for observed patterns of diversification in montane New Guinea. Indirect support for this hypothesis is derived from molecular clock calibrations that indicate a pulse of diversification across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary coincident with a phase of rapid mountain uplift. Simple ecological and climatic models appear inadequate for explaining observed patterns and mechanisms of diversification in the New Guinean montane avifauna. Further insights will require multidisciplinary research integrating geotectonic, palaeoclimatic, genetic, ecological and physiological approaches.

For instance C. nigrorufa is sister to S. spilodera.

Last edited by Daniel Philippe : Friday 20th April 2018 at 12:29.
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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 13:48   #2
LeNomenclatoriste
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Sinrocires subgen.nov., well, there are worse
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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 15:04   #3
sicklebill
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We find evidence of ecological convergence and present a revised taxonomic and systematic treatment of the subfamily integrating information from new (ND2) and existing molecular phylogenetic reconstructions.

So what do they recommend? I don't have access to the paper
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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 15:16   #4
LeNomenclatoriste
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Taxonomic recommendation


Subfamily Sericornithinae Mathews 1946
Tribe Smicrornithini Schodde, Christidis and Norman, this work
Genus Smicrornis Gould 1843
Smicrornis brevirostris (Gould 1838)—Australia

Tribe Calamanthini Schodde, Christidis and Norman, this
work
Genus Calamanthus Gould 1838
Calamanthus fuliginosus (Vigors and Horsfield
1827)—coastal southeast Australia and Tasmania
Calamanthus montanellus Milligan 1903—southwest
Australia
Calamanthus campestris (Gould 1841)—central west
to central south Australia

Genus Hylacola Gould 1843
Hylacola pyrrhopygia (Vigors and Horsfield 1827)—
southeast Australia (west to Mt. Lofty-Flinders Ranges)
Hylacola cauta Gould 1843—southwest and central
south Australia (east to central Victoria and New South Wales)

Tribe Pyrrholaemini Schodde, Christidis and Norman, this
work
Genus Pycnoptilus Gould 1851
Pycnoptilus floccosus Gould 1851—southeast
Australia

Genus Pyrrholaemus Gould 1841
Pyrrholaemus brunneus Gould 1841—inland south
and central Australia
Pyrrholaemus sagittata (Latham 1801)—south and
central east Australia

Tribe Sericornithini
Genus Origma Gould 1838
Subgenus Origma
Origma (Origma) solitaria (Lewin 1808)—central
coastal New South Wales (sandstone formations)
Subgenus Crateroscelis Sharpe 1883
Origma (Crateroscelis) murina (P.L. Sclater
1858)—lowland to mid-montane New Guinea, satellite
islands
Origma (Crateroscelis) robusta (De Vis 1898)—
mid to upper montane New Guinea

Genus Neosericornis Mathews 1912
Neosericornis citreogularis (Gould 1838)—coastal
east Australia

Genus Aethomyias Sharpe 1879
Subgenus Bicolornis Schodde, Christidis and
Norman, this work
Aethomyias (Bicolornis) nigrorufus (Salvadori
1894)—mid to upper montane New Guinea
Subgenus Aethomyias
Aethomyias (Aethomyias) spilodera (G.R. Gray
1859)—lowland to mid-montane New Guinea, satellite
islands
Subgenus Arfakornis Mathews 1916
Aethomyias (Arfakornis) rufescens (Salvadori
1876)—lower to mid-montane New Guinea (Vogelkop)
Aethomyias (Arfakornis) perspicillatus (Salvadori
1896)—mid to upper montane New Guinea (central cordille-
ra, north coast ranges)
Aethomyias (Arfakornis) papuensis (De Vis
1894)—upper montane New Guinea (central cordillera)
Aethomyias (Arfakornis) arfakianus (Salvadori
1876)—lower to mid-montane New Guinea

Genus Sericornis Gould 1838
Subgenus Sinrocires Schodde, Christidis and
Norman, this work
Sericornis (Sinrocires) magnirostra (Gould
1838)—coastal east Australia (except Cape York Peninsula)
Sericornis (Sinrocires) beccarii Salvadori 1874—
Cape York Peninsula, Aru Is, lowland to lower montane south
and west New Guinea
Sericornis (Sinrocires) nouhuysi van Oort 1909—
mid to upper montane New Guinea
Subgenus Sericornis
Sericornis (Sericornis) maculatus Gould 1847—
southwest and central south Australia (east to South
Australian gulfs)
Sericornis (Sericornis) humilis Gould 1838—
Tasmania and King Is. (species identity of east Bass Strait
populations unresolved)
Sericornis (Sericornis) keri Mathews 1920—north-
east Queensland tablelands
Sericornis (Sericornis) frontalis (Vigors and
Horsfield 1827)—coastal east Australia (west to Mt. Lofty
Range and north to northeast Queensland)


Also, unlike them, I have treated Chthonicola as a subgenus of Pyrrholaemus

Last edited by LeNomenclatoriste : Friday 20th April 2018 at 17:07.
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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 15:38   #5
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Environmental determinism, and not interspecific competition, drives morphological variability in Australasian warblers (Acanthizidae)

Vicente García‐Navas Marta Rodríguez‐Rey Petter Z. Marki Les Christidis
First published: 23 March 2018 https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3925
Ecology & Evolution

Open Access
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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 17:00   #6
James Jobling
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Scrubwrens and mouse warblers (Norman Christidis & Schodde); Sinrocires is a semi-palindrome of genus Sericornis; Bicolornis refers to the plumage of the Bicoloured Mouse Warbler.
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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 17:49   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
Scrubwrens and mouse warblers (Norman Christidis & Schodde); Sinrocires is a semi-palindrome of genus Sericornis; Bicolornis refers to the plumage of the Bicoloured Mouse Warbler.
Quote:
Sinrocires is an arbitrarily formed anagram of Sericornis, gender masculine.
Quote:
Bicolornis is monospecific and endemic to mid-montane New Guinea. Its name is an arbitrary combination of letters derived from the English name for its species, ‘Bicoloured Scrubwren’, gender masculine.
(Note that, as per the above, Bicolornis does not end in the Greek word ορνις, it just ends like it coincidentally. (And, e.g., a family name formed from it should in principle be Bicolornidae, not Bicolornithidae.))

(Note also that all the new taxon names in the work are attributed to Schodde, Christidis & Norman, while the work itself is authored by Norman, Christidis & Schodde. I'm not clear how this type of attribution might be deemed protected under the Code, however.)

Last edited by l_raty : Friday 20th April 2018 at 20:28.
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Old Friday 20th April 2018, 18:09   #8
James Jobling
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Despite the authors' intention Sinrocires is a semi-palindrome (i.e. Sericornis spelled backwards). Resicornis would be an arbitrarily formed anagram. I also fail to see how Bicolornis can be an arbitrary combination from "Bicoloured Scrubwren," unless they have thrown Sericornis in there somewhere. We can always rely upon Christidis and Schodde to entertain.

Last edited by James Jobling : Friday 20th April 2018 at 18:11.
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Old Saturday 21st April 2018, 11:41   #9
l_raty
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This type of statement is just an attempt to make the name independent from actual Greek/Latin grammar under the Code.

F.i., this ensures that the grammatical gender of Bicolornis will be the gender indicated by the author, whatever the actual gender of ὄρνις in Greek. In the present case, it might be argued that it doesn't really matter; but there have been cases where authors proposed generic names ending in a word of fixed gender in Greek/Latin, but declared these names to have another gender. In such cases, the final component is deemed to be Greek or Latin unless the authors had stated otherwise (Art. 26); and the gender of the name is thus in principle fixed by Greek/Latin grammar (under Art. 30.1), whatever the authors' original indication of gender. When this type of thing happens, the subsequent treatment of the name is likely to be inconsistent: some authors will treat the name in accordance to the original, but incorrect, indication; others will treat it in accordance to Greek/Latin dictionaries. Inconsistent treatment is not desirable. If the name is declared an arbitrary combination of letters, its gender is determined under Art. 30.2 instead of 30.1: classical Latin/Greek dictionaries become irrelevant, and (in most cases) an original indication of gender will have to be followed.

(This assumes the name does not "reproduce exactly a noun having a gender in a modern European language (without having to be transliterated from a non-Latin alphabet into the Latin alphabet)"; should this be the case, the name would take the gender of this noun in this language, whichever it is. This is because an original indication of gender for a name formed from words that are neither Latin nor Greek must only be accepted (as per Art. 30.2.2) only "unless Art. 30.2.1 applies". There are quite a few modern European languages...)

(This probably also assumes that biologists [or, more generally, users of biological names] are universally illiterate in Greek/Latin; if not, at least some of those "who know" will likely use the Greek/Latin gender anyway, and a consistent subsequent treatment will not necessarily follow.)

Last edited by l_raty : Saturday 21st April 2018 at 13:30.
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Old Friday 11th January 2019, 20:09   #10
Peter Kovalik
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Sericornis maculatus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Philippe View Post
Norman J.A., Christidis L. & Schodde R., in press. Ecological and evolutionary diversification in the Australo-Papuan scrubwrens (Sericornis) and mouse-warblers (Crateroscelis), with a revision of the subfamily Sericornithinae (Aves: Passeriformes: Acanthizidae). Org. Divers. Evol.
IOC Updates Diary:

Jan 11 Revise scrubwrens to follow Norman et al. 2018

Jan 10 Accept split of Spotted Scrubwren
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