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Would you tick the male White Stork at Knepp?

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Old Friday 19th June 2020, 12:47   #1
MK90
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Would you tick the male White Stork at Knepp?

Apologies if this has already been discussed, but i couldn't find anything on the other threads.

What are peoples thoughts on the male White Stork at Knepp? Would you tick it?

Obviously, the tagged birds are't tickable as they are reintroductions, and their offspring wont be tickable until a self-sustaining population is established. But, the male is untagged and, as far as i am aware, a presumed wild bird. Would you consider that individual tickable?
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Old Friday 19th June 2020, 12:49   #2
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Why not start yourself and reasons why?
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Old Friday 19th June 2020, 12:58   #3
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Personally, I probably wouldn't. Although I am on the fence about it hence posting the question on here.

I feel that with the many reintroduction projects and escapees in the country I wouldn't be confident that this really is a wild bird. If I were to go to Knepp now, i'd probably just enjoy the sight as the beginnings of an interesting reintroduction programme and not worry about the 'tickability' of the birds.

Interested to know if this is the general consensus among other birders or not.
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Old Friday 19th June 2020, 13:02   #4
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It's as wild a stork as any other so why not?
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Old Friday 19th June 2020, 13:26   #5
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I heard a Corncrake this week in our village, for 3 consecutive nights. There is no way of knowing if it was a wild bird or part of an ongoing reintroduction scheme. I just enjoyed hearing it calling from my bedroom window throughout the night and when I ventured out to record it on the first pre dawn morning discovery. For me, it's a garden and village tick. My UK list though include birds seen on I.O.S. and Scottish Islands.

With White Storks, there have been many free flying unringed birds for countless years. Unless you have unequivable knowledge that it is an escape, or doubts about how many generations back its DNA goes back, then tick it if you so wish. End of the day, it is in a suitable rewildered habitat and raising a brood,, not a zoo or a cage, so can just be enjoyed.

It's your list, go see it. We could be asking the same question in another 20 years time. Same goes for Ospreys, W.T.Eagles and other reintroduced species. The real test will be when a colour ringed Spoon-billed Sandpiper is found on a vast coastal mudflat along the East Coast.

Good luck.
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Old Friday 19th June 2020, 19:47   #6
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No, because I'll never be able to get there to see one
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Old Saturday 20th June 2020, 07:13   #7
YuShan
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Talking

As far as I know, the male is a genuine wild bird, hence tickable.

You better tick him now before they introduce more birds, because it will then become more difficult to know which one is the tickable one.
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Old Saturday 20th June 2020, 08:15   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YuShan View Post
As far as I know, the male is a genuine wild bird, hence tickable.

You better tick him now before they introduce more birds, because it will then become more difficult to know which one is the tickable one.
Not if they keep sticking bling all over everything.

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Old Saturday 20th June 2020, 11:41   #9
Euan Buchan
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Yeah I would tick them.
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Old Saturday 20th June 2020, 13:16   #10
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Cannot help but whine, that BirdLife did not play a bigger role in bringing this extinct and very charismatic bird back to Britain.
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Old Saturday 20th June 2020, 14:50   #11
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Cannot help but whine, that BirdLife did not play a bigger role in bringing this extinct and very charismatic bird back to Britain.
Because there's little or no hard evidence that they were ever a regular breeding species in Britain. A pair nested in Edinburgh in 14-somethingty-something; that's the only definite breeding record. Was it just a one-off, or part of a breeding population? If they had been breeding widely, you'd expect many more written records for such a conspicuous, human-associated species. So likely a one-off. You wouldn't 'reintroduce' Spotted Sandpiper to Britain, just because a pair bred in western Scotland in 1975 (or whenever it was).
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