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Do your crows 'wash' their food?

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Old Friday 17th May 2019, 11:38   #1
Ruff
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Do your crows 'wash' their food?

Following the introduction of West Nile Virus, the crow population in my area declined sharply and is only coming back slowly but they've started coming to my selection of bird feeders and looking things over. Coincidental with that, I started finding strange items in the bird bath the odd time, pieces of fur, half a mouse, things like that. Then yesterday I looked out to see a crow sitting on the bath and tearing off chunks some sort of fluffy material held under one foot and dropping them in the water. The crow flew off once I got up to get a better look and when I went out to check I found it the material was actually pieces of bread from a slice of end crust, all of which were soggily floating in the water, in company with an apparent chicken bone. Not wanting the water poisoned, I took out the bread and the bone; the crow came back later and dropped the bread back in the bath again and ate most of it; the bone has disappeared. I was telling a birder in another area about this just now and was told that crows in his region come by and wash baby birds in his yard, presumably before eating them. I had assumed 'my' crow was softening the bread I saw it eating, maybe even the bone, but in light of what I was told and the animal material I've been finding, I'm wondering if crows habitually rinse or soak their food before eating. Is this a known behaviour?
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Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 23:47   #2
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Following the introduction of West Nile Virus, the crow population in my area declined sharply and is only coming back slowly but they've started coming to my selection of bird feeders and looking things over. Coincidental with that, I started finding strange items in the bird bath the odd time, pieces of fur, half a mouse, things like that. Then yesterday I looked out to see a crow sitting on the bath and tearing off chunks some sort of fluffy material held under one foot and dropping them in the water. The crow flew off once I got up to get a better look and when I went out to check I found it the material was actually pieces of bread from a slice of end crust, all of which were soggily floating in the water, in company with an apparent chicken bone. Not wanting the water poisoned, I took out the bread and the bone; the crow came back later and dropped the bread back in the bath again and ate most of it; the bone has disappeared. I was telling a birder in another area about this just now and was told that crows in his region come by and wash baby birds in his yard, presumably before eating them. I had assumed 'my' crow was softening the bread I saw it eating, maybe even the bone, but in light of what I was told and the animal material I've been finding, I'm wondering if crows habitually rinse or soak their food before eating. Is this a known behaviour?
I have observed the same behavior in Mississippi and Georgia so it seems to be fairly common. I throw out crust from sourdough bread I bake and they almost always soak it. They also wash McDonalds food wrappers.
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Old Wednesday 22nd May 2019, 22:17   #3
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My 'washing' crow, which I've named Macbeth, is becoming a regular visitor and is unfortunately not limited to soaking and rinsing bread but I find is often bringing some sort of oily or greasy meat-like material that leaves a nasty looking film on the birdbath water. If it gets to be a bio hazard as things get dry this summer I may have to discourage the crow from visiting, which won't take much because they are of course used to persecution. But for now I'm quite pleased to see one close up like this, when I was a kid you never saw a crow within rifle shot- and for good reason of course.
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Old Friday 24th May 2019, 23:28   #4
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My 'washing' crow, which I've named Macbeth, is becoming a regular visitor and is unfortunately not limited to soaking and rinsing bread but I find is often bringing some sort of oily or greasy meat-like material that leaves a nasty looking film on the birdbath water. If it gets to be a bio hazard as things get dry this summer I may have to discourage the crow from visiting, which won't take much because they are of course used to persecution. But for now I'm quite pleased to see one close up like this, when I was a kid you never saw a crow within rifle shot- and for good reason of course.
Again, similar experience. When I was a kid I also tried to hunt crows and I never got close enough to even try. I enjoy crows and I enjoy hearing their different vocabulary, especially when they are in a family setting.
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Old Saturday 25th May 2019, 07:11   #5
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The only bird I've ever seen that was genuinely washing their food, was a Wood Rail in Costa Rica which had what was probably a distasteful or even poisonous millipede but with the Crows, I suspect, especially with bread or furry/feathery things, that it's simply an aid to swallowing?
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Old Saturday 25th May 2019, 18:03   #6
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The only bird I've ever seen that was genuinely washing their food, was a Wood Rail in Costa Rica which had what was probably a distasteful or even poisonous millipede but with the Crows, I suspect, especially with bread or furry/feathery things, that it's simply an aid to swallowing?
I agree, hard crusty bread needs softening up a bit.
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Old Sunday 26th May 2019, 04:27   #7
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I've often seen both Carrion Crows + Magpies dunking bread + other items in water before eating.
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Old Sunday 26th May 2019, 05:41   #8
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I've seen Carrion Crow and Magpie softening hard food like stale bread and dog biscuits in water before eating it. I've also seen Curlew Sandpiper and Grey Plover pulling rag/lugworms out of the mud then running to the water and washing them before eating.
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Old Friday 7th June 2019, 22:43   #9
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Well, my Lady Macbeth crow kept leaving bits of dead birds and mystery animal protein items and pizza slices and all manner of things in my birdbath, either deliberately or because she got scared off as she was dunking them, and as much as I wanted to add crows to my list of regular backyard visitors, I had to start taking out the food items and burying them. That was enough to quickly discourage further visits. More recently though, I've been finding bread items stashed in my mailbox and whereas I would have in previous years blamed the squirrels, now I wonder....
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Old Saturday 8th June 2019, 06:03   #10
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I have a small pumped stream in my garden and get lots of Rooks visiting. Wifey kept calling them Crows, and so after some months of arguing we settled on calling them Crooks.
Very apt as, almost as soon as we put any large bits of food, apple chunks,bread etc then a Rook or two will appear from nowhere! One in particular will always take the bread crusts over to the stream and dunk it in the water, I assume this helps him swallow it easier

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