Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Night bird call, UK

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 00:16   #1
villager
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Warwickshire
Posts: 147
Night bird call, UK

Hi all,
this might be a really obvious one, but I'm listening to a bird call at the moment that I haven't heard before.

I live on the edge of a village, and from the farmland beyond our houses there's a repeated call - quite loud - like a "whop-whop-whop-whop-whop-whop" (seems to be six syllables each times) rising in pitch with each turn. It almost sounds like the blades of a helicopter, or that sound effect you get on TV when someone throws a rapidly spinning object. I'm sure it's something quite common, but I've never heard it before in the six years I've lived here...
villager is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 00:35   #2
deborah4
Registered User
 
deborah4's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sussex
Posts: 6,592
Might be worth checking if any Mute Swan have turned up overnight in the fields when you get up tomorrow! (sounds like the wing flight noise ie. their wings make a very loud 'whoop whoop whoop whoop in flight, changing pitch as they ascend/descend/move away or towards you)

Last edited by deborah4 : Sunday 18th January 2009 at 20:36. Reason: tired and confused last night!
deborah4 is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 00:46   #3
villager
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Warwickshire
Posts: 147
Yes - I regularly see swans in flight over our house (there's quite a bit of water nearby), and that's actually not far off the noise that I'm hearing - however, groups of nocturnal flying swans seems a bit unlikely, and it's also stationary (it was still going as of 2 mins ago when I popped out for a ciggie). I'm wondering if it's not actually a bird at all.
villager is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 00:59   #4
deborah4
Registered User
 
deborah4's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sussex
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by villager View Post
Yes - I regularly see swans in flight over our house (there's quite a bit of water nearby), and that's actually not far off the noise that I'm hearing - however, groups of nocturnal flying swans seems a bit unlikely, and it's also stationary (it was still going as of 2 mins ago when I popped out for a ciggie). I'm wondering if it's not actually a bird at all.
It's not unusual for swan to fly nocturnally - perhaps something's spooked them like a fox? However, if the noise is stationary, the call of Whooper Swan is also similar to what you are describing, a loud 'Whoop Whoop'' .... trumpeting call (Trumpet Swan in the States!). They also remain protective of their young during the first winter, so that could initiate an anxious flock.

Anyway, just one idea, others may have different suggestions


I wondered too whether perhaps it wasn't a bird ..... now I need a ciggie .

Last edited by deborah4 : Sunday 18th January 2009 at 20:36.
deborah4 is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 01:22   #5
deborah4
Registered User
 
deborah4's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sussex
Posts: 6,592
Just one other quick thought, although the sound may appear to be stationary ie. coming from the same spot, it may actually not be the same bird - a group of swans coming into land in the same place, could also give that impression , if you are stationary! ie. Usually one only hears the loudest beats at the closest points to you, could easily only be 6 syllables for each bird as a flock comes down to land one after the other depending on the distance between you and the flock and the direction they are coming in from.

Last edited by deborah4 : Sunday 18th January 2009 at 01:24.
deborah4 is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 05:34   #6
Jan-Paul Charteris
Sussex birder and budding moth enthusiast
 
Jan-Paul Charteris's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Worthing, West Sussex
Posts: 3,865
Not a fox I suppose ?

Jan
Jan-Paul Charteris is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 06:52   #7
davercox
Dave Cox
BF Supporter 2019

 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Dawlish, Devon; in a seabird colony
Posts: 1,720
or a female Tawny Owl ? (they have an amazing variety of calls)
__________________
Dave
davercox is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 07:57   #8
Quercus
homo sarkensis

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: A wee Channel Island
Posts: 3,954
Could it be domestic guinea fowl?
Quercus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 08:32   #9
Tree Sparrow
Registered User
 
Tree Sparrow's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Scotland
Posts: 648
Could it be a snipe drumming? It's normally spring when they do it and I've no idea if they actually do it at night although they commonly do it at dusk. The RSPB site has a recording of it.

TS
Tree Sparrow is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 10:07   #10
Ken Hall
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: aberdeenshire uk
Posts: 1,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by deborah4 View Post
Might be worth checking if any Whooper Swan have turned up overnight in the fields when you get up tomorrow! (sounds like the wing flight noise ie. their wings make a very loud 'whoop whoop whoop whoop in flight, changing pitch as they ascend/descend/move away or towards you)
Sorry to disagree with you Deborah on this point. Mute Swans wing beats are very audible, Whooper Swans wing beats are almost silent. Sorry I can't shed any light on the mystery though.
__________________
My NEW website: THE NATURE OF NORTH-EAST SCOTLAND http://www.thenatureofnortheastscotland.com

I'm Freewheeling Now (Going Rapidly Downhill)
Ken Hall is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 10:34   #11
bitterntwisted
Graham Howard Shortt
 
bitterntwisted's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Leeds, West Yorkshire, England
Posts: 4,854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tree Sparrow View Post
Could it be a snipe drumming?
That's seems a good guess to me, but wouldn't expect it for a few more weeks yet.

Couldn't be mechanical noises from a milking parlour, could it? The milk vats have big rotors which churn the milk regularly.

Graham
__________________

bitterntwisted is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 11:39   #12
rockfowl
Mark Andrews
 
rockfowl's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Leicester, UK
Posts: 8,277
It's true, wild swan wing beats are very silent, not so Mutes which you can generally hear coming from some distance. Graham's suggestion seams rather plausible..
__________________
DigiPics & Artwork - http://www.smandrews.com Digivideos - http://www.youtube.com/user/rockfowlmarkandrews
Support the Oriental Bird Club
rockfowl is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 18:21   #13
villager
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Warwickshire
Posts: 147
Hi, I listened to a recording of Snipe drumming and it's not really close to that. I think as someone said above it's either a Tawny Owl (we have numerous ones nearby) or some agricultural machinery.

The noise was certainly very close to Mute Swan flying, except repeated in a similar pattern over and over again, with that ascending tone.

Having said that, I've got my recorder ready for tonight if necessary!
villager is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 20:06   #14
Flemingo
I'm always wrong and it's always my fault
 
Flemingo's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Colehill Dorset
Posts: 516
You must find out what it is. Pleeease!
__________________
David
Flemingo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 20:35   #15
deborah4
Registered User
 
deborah4's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sussex
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Hall View Post
Sorry to disagree with you Deborah on this point. Mute Swans wing beats are very audible, Whooper Swans wing beats are almost silent. Sorry I can't shed any light on the mystery though.
Of course they are Ken, don't apologise. If you see the reason for my edit on that post, made very late indeed and after a very tiring day, I'd originally put 'Mute', then for some reason, changed it to Whooper! At 1.35am in the morning I wasn't at my best! Of course it was the sound of the wings of a Mute I was referring with regard to the wing beat to but the sound of Whoopers' call in the following post.

I'm still wondering whether it wasn't a bird too! Hope you manage to record the sound Villager!
deborah4 is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 20:38   #16
dantheman
Bah humbug
 
dantheman's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 12,117
Blog Entries: 2
Could it be that eccentric australian geezer who did animal hospital and sang songs about 2 little boys etc (he was quite arty too . . .)

He had a penchant for making strange noises that sounded something like that on occasion . . .
__________________
stithiansreservoirbirding.blogspot.co.uk/ - last update 10/11/15 - really rather remarkable still!!!
dantheman is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th January 2009, 20:40   #17
deborah4
Registered User
 
deborah4's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sussex
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by dantheman View Post
He had a penchant for making strange noises that sounded something like that on occasion . . .
Would that be the 'wobble board' Dan?
deborah4 is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 19th January 2009, 21:14   #18
boddie
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Cheshire
Posts: 233
little owl?
boddie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 20th January 2009, 12:04   #19
villager
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Warwickshire
Posts: 147
I was pointed towards this.
Female Tawny Owl
From about 0:11 onwards, that's pretty close, except mine was softer and not as shrill (further away?). And we do have Tawny Owls in the woods behind our houses, as we're used to hearing their more common calls.

Last edited by villager : Tuesday 20th January 2009 at 12:06.
villager is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 28th August 2019, 15:05   #20
JonnyTweet
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: WHITSTABLE
Posts: 1
Whoop, whoop, whoop call

I had exactly the same call at night back in April May near Whitstable and then again, the first week of August at Roundhill campsite in the New Forest, UK.

This was 5 whoops in the call, increasing in pitch each time.
Had no response for ideas from the RSPB website. With the help of the campsite manager we tracked it down to being a Hoopoe. The manager had friends who had sited it a while ago. Listening to audio it makes exactly the same call just varying in the number of whoops.

www.xeno-canto.org/34580

All the best, Jonny
JonnyTweet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 28th August 2019, 15:18   #21
PYRTLE
Registered User
 
PYRTLE's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: North Norfolk
Posts: 5,551
Thread rebooted after 10 years. Welcome and well done for hearing Hoopoe twice in one year in the UK. I've personally not been that fortunate - only heard them abroad. Though I might suggest that the chances of a Hoopoe calling during the night may be very slim.

P
PYRTLE is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Night call, southern Ontario, Canada cavan wood Bird Identification Q&A 5 Tuesday 19th August 2008 05:03
What is making this thin high pitched call at night? Cyclops Birds & Birding 8 Friday 30th November 2007 19:21
night call - Manitoba, Canada westwind Bird Identification Q&A 5 Wednesday 12th July 2006 15:15
What was that night-time bird call? (UK) pigsonthewing Bird Identification Q&A 12 Saturday 16th April 2005 20:15
I recorded a night bird call... dino Birds & Birding 3 Friday 30th July 2004 17:27



Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.15432310 seconds with 32 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 12:56.