Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special ‚Äď Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

canon 7D or T2i

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 9 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Thursday 25th November 2010, 16:58   #1
owl4one
Registered User
 
owl4one's Avatar

 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: PA
Posts: 17
canon 7D or T2i

Hi all. I've purchased a canon 300mm L 4 IS lens, but I'm using an old canon rebel XT. My pics don't seem to be as sharp as I'd like them (this certainly could be "user error," as I'm fairly new). I'd like to upgrade, and was wondering if the T2i will be sufficient or is the 7D that much better? I'm primarily interrested in bird photography, both "still" and flying. Is the 7D's primary edge a faster focusing system? Will it provider sharper pics? Since I'm not a pro, I'd sacrifice a few missed shots due to focus speed if it meant saving 1/2 price on the camera. Thanks for any feedback!
owl4one is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 25th November 2010, 18:33   #2
Kevin Conville
yardbirder
BF Supporter 2019
 
Kevin Conville's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: State of Chaos
Posts: 2,186
After buying an EF400 f5.6 and using it on my XT, I also wasn't getting consistent results in the form of soft focus. After googling a bit I came across the much controversial front-or-back focus issue associated with longer Canon lenses. On the XT I did the "mirror box" adjustment which takes time and patience but corrected the front focus the 400 exhibited on the XT. This adjustment also caused my EF70-200 and EF-S60 to back focus. Clearly this isn't an elegant solution to this problem.

I read about MFA (micro focus adjust) which the 50D, 7D, and all other xD series cameras have, BUT not the 60D or any of the Rebels. After borrowing my neighbor's 50D and testing the MFA with both my 400 and 70-200 I became convinced this isn't a luxury, but a necessity. The MFA will remember up to 20 different lenses and every time you replace a lens, the body knows what to do with it. Pretty cool.

In addition to having MFA, the focus system is far superior to the Rebel series. The Servo mode on the 7D works well and isn't just something to fill out a spec sheet as in the Rebel series. This is what you want for those birds in flight.

You also get 1/8000 instead of 1/4000 shutter speed over the Rebel, and very fast frames per second when you need them.

There are lots of other little features and handling advantages the 7D has over the Rebel that make it a more satisfying photographic tool. Overall I think it's the best choice for the birding photographer amongst Canon's line.

Take a bit of time and look into the front-back focus I mention above. Some would claim it is mythology but I've proven to myself it is not.

Cheers,
Kevin

added: I forgot to mention that I bought the 7D
__________________
my bird pics

Scott's Miracle Grow KILLING Birds, for Years!
read this: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=226714

Last edited by Kevin Conville : Thursday 25th November 2010 at 18:48.
Kevin Conville is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 28th November 2010, 16:56   #3
Nikon Kid
Love them Sula Bassana
 
Nikon Kid's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Peterborough UK
Posts: 4,276
The 7d is a great camera, but more importantly get closer, aim for 1000/1 sec perched birds 2000/1 sec BIF
__________________
Terry Love All Wildlife

My Images http://www.pbase.com/canon_boy
Nikon Kid is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 28th November 2010, 18:57   #4
h14nha
Registered User

 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: wales
Posts: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by owl4one View Post
Hi all. I've purchased a canon 300mm L 4 IS lens, but I'm using an old canon rebel XT. My pics don't seem to be as sharp as I'd like them (this certainly could be "user error," as I'm fairly new). I'd like to upgrade, and was wondering if the T2i will be sufficient or is the 7D that much better? I'm primarily interrested in bird photography, both "still" and flying. Is the 7D's primary edge a faster focusing system? Will it provider sharper pics? Since I'm not a pro, I'd sacrifice a few missed shots due to focus speed if it meant saving 1/2 price on the camera. Thanks for any feedback!
I went from a 450d/XSi to a 7d. I chose to change for primarily 2 reasons,

1) frames per second - from 3.6 to 8 is a huge jump. Some people frown on the 'spray and pray' technique, but, with bird photography the subject sometimes doesn't hang around for long. When its gone its gone. You will find with twice as many shots to choose from, your 'keepers' will improve.

2) My walk around ISO setting on my 450d/XSi was 400. When I had to push it to maintain my shutter speed, I hated the noise ISO 1600 produced. With my 7d my walkaround setting is 1250. I have no fears in pushing it higher if the light levels drop when I'm out.

Your XT can produce great images, but, your keepers will increase with a higher frame rate, better ISO capabilities and a superior auto focus system. What lens did you have previously ? Did you expect your images to improve when you bought the 300f4 ? I did when I bought my 100-400. Instead I was forced into learning the camera and lens from scratch.

I love bird photography too. What I learned is you have to be CLOSE CLOSE CLOSE to get great feather detail. No lens or camera will can improve upon that. Don't forget post processing and the effect that will have on improving your images too. If you can find reasons to spend out for a 7d then go ahead. Its a lot of money to find out that the problem is you and a thousand pounds doesn't resolve your issues.

What modes are you using on you XT ? What is your ISO settings ? What shutter speeds are you getting ? How close are you to the birds ? Are you using any support on your camera/lens ? Are you cropping heavily ? If you can give us answers to these, then perhaps we can help you to improve your shots.

These are 2 shots from last week. The first is straight out of camera, no processing except resizing for the web. The second is after some work in Lightroom 3. It was shot in low light at ISO 2500 from about 15 foot away. You must get the bird as large as possible in the frame to give yourself the best chance of zooming in and re-sizing and retaining detail.

Hope I've helped you somewhat
Regards.
Ian
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Nuthatch OOC.JPG
Views:	270
Size:	119.5 KB
ID:	295598  Click image for larger version

Name:	Nuthatch Eating.jpg
Views:	286
Size:	130.5 KB
ID:	295601  
__________________
Flickr
h14nha is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 5th December 2010, 19:16   #5
owl4one
Registered User
 
owl4one's Avatar

 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: PA
Posts: 17
Thanks for your tips and questions, Ian.

The 300 f4 L is my first long lens. I read that it can produce some very sharp, clear images, so I wanted to get a lens that I could grow into and improve with. Iím doing a lot of experimenting with shutter speeds and apertures etc. Iím using aperture priority a lot, and hope to do more complete manual shooting.

I donít have any special post processing programs just yet. Iím starting to use the canon programs that came with the camera, doing a lot of trimming/cropping, and tweaking saturation, brightness, etc.

I find that even with my back yard birds, where I might be 25-30 feet away, my shots arenít as clear and sharp as I would expect. Iím using f4 and getting nice depth of field but that minute detail I see in other photographerís pics is not there yet. Iím trying to keep ISO down hoping that will help- 400 to 800- maybe thatís incorrect? An I guess I need to try to get even closer to my subject.

Iím thinking about a 1.4 extender to see if that helps.

Itís all been very fun and has helped me get out in the field more- now I want to improve my skills and hopefully see better results!

Mike

Quote:
Originally Posted by h14nha View Post
I went from a 450d/XSi to a 7d. I chose to change for primarily 2 reasons,

1) frames per second - from 3.6 to 8 is a huge jump. Some people frown on the 'spray and pray' technique, but, with bird photography the subject sometimes doesn't hang around for long. When its gone its gone. You will find with twice as many shots to choose from, your 'keepers' will improve.

2) My walk around ISO setting on my 450d/XSi was 400. When I had to push it to maintain my shutter speed, I hated the noise ISO 1600 produced. With my 7d my walkaround setting is 1250. I have no fears in pushing it higher if the light levels drop when I'm out.

Your XT can produce great images, but, your keepers will increase with a higher frame rate, better ISO capabilities and a superior auto focus system. What lens did you have previously ? Did you expect your images to improve when you bought the 300f4 ? I did when I bought my 100-400. Instead I was forced into learning the camera and lens from scratch.

I love bird photography too. What I learned is you have to be CLOSE CLOSE CLOSE to get great feather detail. No lens or camera will can improve upon that. Don't forget post processing and the effect that will have on improving your images too. If you can find reasons to spend out for a 7d then go ahead. Its a lot of money to find out that the problem is you and a thousand pounds doesn't resolve your issues.

What modes are you using on you XT ? What is your ISO settings ? What shutter speeds are you getting ? How close are you to the birds ? Are you using any support on your camera/lens ? Are you cropping heavily ? If you can give us answers to these, then perhaps we can help you to improve your shots.

These are 2 shots from last week. The first is straight out of camera, no processing except resizing for the web. The second is after some work in Lightroom 3. It was shot in low light at ISO 2500 from about 15 foot away. You must get the bird as large as possible in the frame to give yourself the best chance of zooming in and re-sizing and retaining detail.

Hope I've helped you somewhat
Regards.
Ian
owl4one is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 6th December 2010, 02:02   #6
Cardamom Pod
Very well, Dr. Humorous Droll
 
Cardamom Pod's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 634
I would suggest a blind to get closer to your backyard birds. Also, I have the XSi/450D, which is 2 generations ahead of your xt, and I don't exactly love noise levels even at iso 400, so I would really try to use the lowest level you can. A tripod would help with that, but then bird movement can still blur a shot, so maybe the 7d with its excellent high iso would be a good next step. Also, a 1.4x extender would definitely be a good idea no matter what you decide about a new body.
__________________
Canon XSi/450d, Canon 400mm F5.6L Canon ef-s 55-250mm, Canon ef-s 18-55mm, Bushnell Excursion EX 8x36
www.binocularbirdviews.blogspot.com
Cardamom Pod is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Canon T2i vs Canon 50D owl4one Cameras And Photography 3 Wednesday 5th January 2011 22:11
Is the price of a 7d really justified when compared to a 550d/T2i? mikenott Canon 22 Monday 16th August 2010 19:13
Canon 550D (T2i) Announced wrogers Canon 11 Monday 8th March 2010 00:08

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.18845105 seconds with 18 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 06:28.