Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Magnifying the passion for nature. Zeiss Victory Harpia 95. New!

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Spotted eagles

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 18 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Monday 12th March 2012, 15:08   #1
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Spotted eagles

Wells & Inskipp 2012. A proposed new genus of booted eagles (tribe Aquilini). Bull BOC 132(1): 70–72.
  • Aquiloides, gen. nov. (feminine), comprising clanga, pomarina, hastata.
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 12th March 2012, 16:44   #2
Xenospiza
Undescribed
 
Xenospiza's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: In a drawer
Posts: 10,240
Why don't they just lump it with Ictinaetus (including Lophoaetus)?
I can't see the value of two monotypic genera and one genus which is only "slighty above monotypic" (with all the hybridisation of G × L Spotted Eagles).
Xenospiza is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 17th March 2012, 18:44   #3
thyoloalethe
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Posts: 180
Presumably the name Clanga Adamowicz 1857 for these species is a nomen nudum?
thyoloalethe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 17th March 2012, 19:06   #4
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Clanga

John Penhallurick's World Bird Info:
Quote:
Clanga Tyzenhaus,1858,in Adamowicz,Revue et Magasin de Zoologie pure et appliquée,sér.2,9,for Dec.1857,p.604.Type,by tautonymy,Falco maculatus G.F.Gmelin,1788 = Aquila clanga Pallas,1811.
Note: Clanga includes A.clanga and A.pomarina.
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 17th March 2012, 23:18   #5
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
Revue et magasin de zoologie pure et …
(December 1857)
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/t...age/7/mode/1up .
Republished an article which had been published in Russia.
Notice necrologique sur Le Comte Constantin Tyzenhauz par M. A. F. Adamowicz, docteur et professeur a l’universite de Vilna, conseiller d’Etat, etc
Attached to the necologique was Enumeration des travaux scientifiques litteraires publies ou en manuscrits de C. Tyenhauz. Number 14 is Sur les Aigles d’Europe, ou remarques sur quelques Oiseaux de proie en Europe. En reponse a Schlegel, auteur de la Revue critique des Oiseaux en Europe. Cf. Revue zoolog. 1847. Which should be checked for mention of Clanga. But number 19 is observations sur la faune ornithologique des provinces de la Nouvelle-Russie situees sur les cotes de la mer Noire. 1853, en manuscript. …suives de la proposition de former un nouveau genre Clanga, subdivise en trios especes: Clanga naevia (Falco maculates, Gmelini), C. fasciata et macrodactyla (v. der Muhle), …
Here is the Russian version which seems to be published first in 1853 or early 1854?:
Volume 26 of Bulletin de la Societe imperiale des naturalists de Moscou, .

http://books.google.com/books?id=_R0...page&q&f=false .

On page 529.
I think by listing the three species it is not nomen nudum for Clanga Adamowicz (Tyzenhauz MS) in Bulletin de la Societe imperiale des naturalists de Moscou, (4)1853 (1854?)

This volume has Eversmann’s description of Lanius mollis.
Zoonomen dates it as :
Lanius excubitor mollis Eversmann 1853 Bull.Soc.Imp.Nat.Moscou 26 no.4 p.498 .
Anyone know what v. d. Muhle means? Are any of these names synonyms of pomarina or hastata?
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 17th March 2012, 23:36   #6
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
I found Remarques sur les Aigles d’Europe par M. Constantin Tyzenhauz. September 1846 Revue Zoologique v. 9. I cannot find either the genus Clanga nor clanga as a species. But it informs the little information in Adamowicz about what Tyzenhauz thought about naevia, maculatus, pomarina et al.
http://books.google.com/books?id=kml...enhauz&f=false .
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th March 2012, 00:27   #7
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
In the remarks on the eagles of Europe Tyzenhauz mentions Falco Mogilnik a name I had never seen.
In a paper published in late 2011 Mlikovsky called it nomen dubium.
Aquila mogilnik S.G. Gmelin
Aquila mogilnik S.G. Gmelin, 1771: 445, pl. 11b.
Now: Aquila sp. indet. See below.
Type series: Single specimen, collected in summer 1769. I estimated the collection date
from the restricted type locality (see below) and S.G. Gmelin’s itinerary.
Type locality: Said to be similar as for Accipiter korschun by S.G. Gmelin (1771: 447).
I thus restrict here the type locality of Aquila mogilnik to Staročerkasskaâ, Russia.
Remarks: Aquila mogilnik was treated as indeterminate by Pallas (1811a: 353). Stephens
(1826: 15) used it as a valid name for the eagle species now known as Aquila heliaca
Savigny, 1809, without explanation, but perhaps because the species name was directly
derived from the Russian vernacular name могильник (mogil’nik), which means
Aquila heliaca. Stephens’s opinion was followed by several authors (e.g. Strickland
1855: 57; Schlegel 1862: 3; Heuglin 1869: 44; Giebel 1872: 395; Dresser 1873: 521,
1903: 521; Gurney 1873: 99; see also Alléon 1866: 274). Sharpe (1874: 240) applied
the name to the eagle species now known as Aquila nipalensis Hodgson, 1833, without
explanation. Blanford (1894: 283-286) and Hartert (1914: 1092, 1099) suggested to set
the name aside as indeterminate. In agreement with Pallas (1811a), Blanford (1876:
111, 1894) and Hartert (1914) I treat Aquila mogilnik S.G. Gmelin, 1771, as a nomen
dubium (ICZN 1999: 111).

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...L-ghtG9FaCyPLA .
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th March 2012, 01:14   #8
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
"Anyone know what v. d. Muhle means?"
Pretty sure it is :
Heinrich von der Mühle.
Author of Monographie der europäischen Sylvien, and Beitraege zur Ornithologie Griechenlands.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th March 2012, 19:42   #9
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 2,760
Richmond C.W. (1917): Generic names applied to birds during the years 1906 to 1915, inclusive, with additions to Waterhouse's "Index generum avium". Proc.U.S.Natl.Mus., 53:565-636. http://www.archive.org/stream/procee...e/584/mode/1up
"Clanga TYZENHAUS, in Adamowicz, Revue et Mag. de Zool., sér. 2, vol. 9, for December, 1857 (1858), p. 104.
Type Falco maculatus GMELIN...........(Buteonidae)
(Tautonymy; Aquila clanga Pallas is a synonym.)"
Friedmann H. (1950): The birds of north and middle America. Bull.U.S.Natl.Mus. 50(11):1-793. http://www.archive.org/stream/bullet...e/452/mode/1up, as a synonym of Aquila:
"Clanga TYZENHAUS, in Adamowicz, Rev. Mag. Zool., sér. 2 (ix), for Dec. 1857 (1858), 104.
Type, by tautonymy, Falco maculatus Gmelin=Aquila clanga Pallas)."
John Penhallurick's notes almost look like a direct quote of these.
The text on the Richmond Index card at Zoonomen is slightly different, though, with the author the other way around ("Adamowicz, ex Tyzenhaus", not "Tyzenhaus, in Adamowicz"--thus recognising the publication and disregarding the MS, which is the "modern way"), and all three originally-included species listed without declaring one of them the type.
My reading of the current Code is that a type fixation by tautonymy would have required that Aquila clanga Pallas be cited in the original publication introducing Clanga, and it's not. (But this may be another long-standing difference between what the Code says and what ornithologists do in terms of type-species fixation...? In any case, Peters seems to recognise quite a few similar type fixations [tautonymy, via a statement with an "=" sign between two binomina].)
If the name was used during 1906-1915 (as suggested by its inclusion in Richmond, 1917), or before, it would be interesting to know by whom, and how. (I don't find anything on the web.) It is used (as a subgenus) on the pages of the Museum Wiesbaden, which claim to follow Wolters (1982) as its "Ordnungsprinzip": http://www.mwnh.de/samm042.html. Did Wolters use it?


Re. Heinrich Karl Leopold, Graf von der Mühle: no doubt. (See also the Richmond Index card, that has "Heinr. Graf" inserted in front of the name.) But in his writings, I can't find anything that looks like an Aquila macrodactyla or a Falco macrodactylus. The two references to von der Mühle's works that appear on the Index card suggest that Richmond also looked for this. One is in Isis (Oken) and is here: http://www.archive.org/stream/isisvo...e/236/mode/1up; the other is the Beiträge zur Ornithologie Griechenlands: www.archive.org/stream/beitraegezurorni00mh. Both are striked out on the card, so apparently no success...

Couldn't macrodactyla be a typo for brachyctyla (short-toed eagle)...? Tyzenhaus lists this species along with small Aquila in his Remarques sur les Aigles d'Europe, and in the text he strongly rejects the separate placement of this species in "Circaëtos". Then, if his "Clanga fasciata" is Bonelli's eagle, what he would be advocating here, would be to separate the largest eagles (golden, imperial, and the likes) from the smaller ones. Something not too dissimilar from what we used to do with Hieraeetus, in a sense; but with short-toed kept within the eagles, and with a "size limit" placed somewhat higher.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 18th March 2012, 23:16   #10
thyoloalethe
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Posts: 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
My reading of the current Code is that a type fixation by tautonymy would have required that Aquila clanga Pallas be cited in the original publication introducing Clanga, and it's not.
The code states:

68.4. Type species by absolute tautonymy. If a valid species-group name, or its cited synonym, originally included [Art. 67.2] in a nominal genus-group taxon is identical with the name of that taxon, the nominal species denoted by that specific name (if available) is the type species (type species by absolute tautonymy).

So yes, you’re correct that no type was established by tautonymy. But I think that Clanga may be an available name; it’s possible that no type has been designated yet.

Is there anything else which might preclude recognition of Clanga as a valid genus? Again from the code:

12.1. Requirements. To be available, every new name published before 1931 must satisfy the provisions of Article 11 and must be accompanied by a description or a definition of the taxon that it denotes, or by an indication.

12.2. Indications. For the purposes of this Article the word "indication" denotes ... the following:

....

12.2.5. in the case of a new genus-group name, the use of one or more available specific names in combination with it, or clearly included under it, or clearly referred to it by bibliographic reference, provided that the specific name or names can be unambiguously assigned to a nominal species-group taxon or taxa;

No description was provided, but I take it inclusion of "Falco maculatus, Gmelini" would suffice as an indication, so I cannot find anything that would make Clanga an unavailable name. I wonder if Wells & Inskipp had a different take on it, or if they were even aware of the name Clanga at all.
thyoloalethe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 19th March 2012, 03:49   #11
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
Heinrich Karl Leopold, Graf von der Mühle in his article “beiträge zu Koch's bayerischer Zoologie’, pages 24, 41 and 65 of Correspondenzblatt des zoologisch-mineralogischen Vereins in Regensburg(1847); reorganizes the raptors.
http://books.google.com/books?id=Huh...gbs_navlinks_s . In this article he makes no mention of macrodactyla but does talk about brachyctyla. So it may be a mistake by Adamowicz.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 19th March 2012, 06:04   #12
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 2,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by thyoloalethe View Post
So yes, you’re correct that no type was established by tautonymy. But I think that Clanga may be an available name; it’s possible that no type has been designated yet.
69.1.1. In the absence of a prior type fixation for a nominal genus or subgenus, an author is deemed to have designated one of the originally included nominal species as type species, if he or she states (for whatever reason, right or wrong) that it is the type or type species, or uses an equivalent term, and if it is clear that that author accepts it as the type species.
So if we don't accept the tautonymy, Richmond (1917) could be interpreted as designating a type. But ideally we should make sure that there was no other similar statement published earlier.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 19th March 2012, 18:15   #13
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
So are we saying that Wells & Inskeep are required by the code to use the old name of Clanga for the new genus they erected??
23.1. Statement of the Principle of Priority. The valid name of a taxon is the oldest available name applied to it, …
23.2. Purpose. In accordance with the objects of the Code (see Preamble), the Principle of Priority is to be used to promote stability and it is not intended to be used to upset a long-accepted name in its accustomed meaning by the introduction of a name that is its senior synonym or homonym …
But when setting up a new genus this purpose is not implicated because the status quo is already going to be upset? I think the case for Clanga is a weak and technical one. Perhaps Wells & Inskeep should move to suppress Clanga.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 19th March 2012, 18:59   #14
dantheman
Bah humbug
 
dantheman's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 11,664
Blog Entries: 2
Basically, someone's dropped a clanga???
__________________
stithiansreservoirbirding.blogspot.co.uk/ - last update 10/11/15 - really rather remarkable still!!!
dantheman is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 19th March 2012, 19:42   #15
birdboybowley
Registered User
BF Supporter 2018
 
birdboybowley's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: W Sussex, England
Posts: 8,296
Quote:
Originally Posted by dantheman View Post
Basically, someone's dropped a clanga???
__________________
"...Bureaucracy is a parasite that preys on free thought and suffocates free spirit..." Douglas Adams

www.adambowleyart.com
birdboybowley is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2016 2017 2018 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 19th March 2012, 20:01   #16
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 2,760
Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
Perhaps Wells & Inskeep should move to suppress Clanga.
If Clanga is available for this group, and with Aquiloides currently not in use, I really don't see how one could do this.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 19th March 2012, 23:28   #17
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
"I really don't see how one could do this." I had not thought of that. I agree.
I think it is interesting W& I made the genus female. I guess not to change the specific names?
30.1.4.4. A compound genus-group name ending in the suffix -ites, -oides, -ides, -odes, or -istes is to be treated as masculine unless its author, when establishing the name, stated that it had another gender or treated it as such by combining it with an adjectival species-group name in another gender form.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 6th June 2012, 12:30   #18
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Clanga

Gregory & Dickinson 2012. Clanga has priority over Aquiloides (or how to drop a clanger). Bull BOC 132(2): 135–136.
Quote:
...the correct citation should read:
Clanga Adamowicz, 1858...
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 6th June 2012, 14:29   #19
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 1,762
My position is that the earliest publication was either 1853 or 1854.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 6th June 2012, 15:15   #20
GMK
Registered User
 
GMK's Avatar

 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Rio de Janeiro
Posts: 440
Then submit something for publication! www.birdforum does not constitute a repository that will be searched by tomorrow’s, never mind the less immediate future’s, nomenclaturists—H&M4 will be.
__________________
Guy M. Kirwan
Hon. Editor Bulletin of the British Ornithologists' Club http://guykirwan.webs.com/
Turkey book http://www.nhbs.com/title.php?tefno=158488
Greater Antilles site guide http://www.nhbs.com/title.php?tefno=162873
GMK is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 15th November 2013, 18:47   #21
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,593
Jan Ove Gjershaug, Heather R. L. Lerner, Sonia Kabra and Rachel Wadleigh. Phylogeny and Taxonomy of the Booted Eagles (Accipitriformes: Aquilinae). I Worldwide Raptor Conference, October 2013, Bariloche, Argentina.
Abstract:
We present a supermatrix phylogeny of all booted eagles based on an analysis of published sequences from six loci, including all 38 extant species of booted eagles and one extinct species (Haast’s Eagle, Harpagornis moorei). We find molecular support for five major clades within the booted eagles: Nisaetus (10 species), Spizaetus (4 species), Clanga (3 species), Hieraaetus (6 species) and Aquila (11 species), requiring generic changes for 14 taxa. Additionally, we recommend that the Long-crested Eagle (Lophaetus occipitalis) and the Black Eagle (Ictinaetus malayensis) should be kept in their own genera, as they are morphologically very distinct. The clade including the Booted Eagle (H. pennatus), Little Eagle (H. morphnoides), Pygmy Eagle (H. weiskei), Ayres’s Eagle (H. ayresii) and Wahlberg’s Eagle (H. wahlbergi) can be kept in the genus Hieraaetus as it does not result in paraphyly in the genus Aquila any longer if the spotted eagles are placed in the new proposed genus Clanga. The Rufous-bellied Eagle should be placed in the genus Lophotriorchis. To make consistency in the English names, we recommend that “hawk-eagle” should be used only for species in the genera Nisaetus and Spizaetus. We suggest the following new names: Cassin’s Eagle (Aquila africana), Bonaparte’s Eagle (A. spilogaster), Ayres’s Eagle (Hieraaetus ayresii), and Black-and-chestnut Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus isidori).
Peter Kovalik is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 15th November 2013, 20:43   #22
Xenospiza
Undescribed
 
Xenospiza's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: In a drawer
Posts: 10,240
That does not really appear to add anything to what could be learned from Lerner & Mindell, 2005 (on the basis of which I changed the genera in my list). But what are the ten species of Nisaetus?
Xenospiza is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 16th November 2013, 06:49   #23
Daniel Philippe
Registered User
 
Daniel Philippe's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: France
Posts: 969
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xenospiza View Post
what are the ten species of Nisaetus?
cirrhatus, floris, alboniger, bartelsi, lanceolatus, philippensis, pinskeri, nanus, nipalensis, kelaarti.

But what are the 6 species of Hieraaetus ? I have only 5: morphonoides, weiskei, pennatus, ayresii, wahlbergi. Could the sixth be moorei ?
Daniel Philippe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 16th November 2013, 07:09   #24
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,593
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Philippe View Post
cirrhatus, floris, alboniger, bartelsi, lanceolatus, philippensis, pinskeri, nanus, nipalensis, kelaarti.

But what are the 6 species of Hieraaetus ? I have only 5: morphonoides, weiskei, pennatus, ayresii, wahlbergi. Could the sixth be moorei ?
Daniel
Michael Bunce, Marta Szulkin, Heather R. L Lerner, Ian Barnes, Beth Shapiro, Alan Cooper & Richard N Holdaway, 2005. Ancient DNA Provides New Insights into the Evolutionary History of New Zealand's Extinct Giant Eagle. PLOS Biology 3:1.
Abstract and PDF here
Peter Kovalik is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 16th November 2013, 07:18   #25
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Philippe View Post
But what are the 6 species of Hieraaetus ? I have only 5: morphonoides, weiskei, pennatus, ayresii, wahlbergi. Could the sixth be moorei ?
Hume & Walters 2012:
Quote:
DNA analysis (Bunce et al. 2005) has shown that Haast's Eagle formed a clade with two small forest eagles, Aquila morphnoides, the Little Eagle, and A. pennatus, the Booted Eagle, ...
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Spotted eagles: hybridisation Richard Klim Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature 7 Tuesday 5th January 2016 07:33
Lesser Spotted Eagles? (in Turkey) sgokce Bird Identification Q&A 5 Monday 28th September 2009 13:07
Greater Spotted Eagles JANJ Your Birding Day 1 Sunday 19th November 2006 17:56
spotted eagles in camargue scary-canary France 5 Wednesday 21st December 2005 20:01
Greater Spotted Eagles in Bulgaria. watcher Birds Of Prey 4 Sunday 20th February 2005 08:21

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.38537908 seconds with 36 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 11:41.