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Taphrospilus

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Old Thursday 10th October 2013, 14:00   #1
Taphrospilus
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Taphrospilus

In "Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird" page 379 is written about Taphrospilus:

Taphrospilus Gr. tarphus close, dense; spilos spot.

The question is if tarphus is realy the origin. Maybe Ditch, ταφρος (taphros) is the etymological origin, referring to the habitat where the type species was found?
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Old Friday 11th October 2013, 08:15   #2
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Maybe le versant oriental des Andes (the eastern slopes of the Andes) in original description of Simon http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/i...e/335/mode/1up is a hint for "ditch" and may be interpreted as the Upper Napo River Valley (place where Gould http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/i...e/170/mode/1up located his specimen)?
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Old Friday 11th October 2013, 09:50   #3
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More likely Taphrospilus is in error for Tephrospilus, alluding to the grey tipped tail of the Many-spotted Hummingbird, or perceived colour of the spotted underparts in a dead specimen (Gr. tephros ash-coloured < tephra ashes) (cf. genus Taphrolesbia).
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Old Saturday 12th October 2013, 16:18   #4
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But you agree that tarphus close, dense is wrong in your dictionary?
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Old Saturday 12th October 2013, 20:01   #5
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Old Tuesday 22nd October 2013, 11:29   #6
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So how do you come to this conclusion? I ask as the r is definetly in different places in both words Taphrospilus versus tarphus
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Old Tuesday 22nd October 2013, 18:27   #7
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Taphrospilus Simon, 1910, Revue Francaise d'Ornithologie, 1, p. 261, is undoubtedly a misspelling, but whether for Tarphospilus or Tephrospilus must remain a mystery since the author gave a diagnosis but no etymology. He later (1918, Notice sur les Travaux Scientifiques, p. 38) spelled it Taphropsilus (per Peters, V, p. 60, footnote 2).
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Old Wednesday 23rd October 2013, 10:53   #8
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Tephrolesbia Eugene Simon, Revue Francaise d’Orn., VI No 120 April 7, 1919 Emendation of Taphrolesbia Simon 1918.
Tephropsilus E. Simon Hist. Nat. Trochilidae 1921 emendation of Taphrospilus Simon 1910. He says “Ecrit Taphropsilus par suite d’un lapsus.” However it was originally written Taphropilus and not Taphropsilus. The spelling Taphropsilus occurs in his Notice sur les Travaux Scientifique 1918 p. 38.
Generic names applied to birds during the years 1906 to 1915 inclusive with additions and corrections to Waterhouse’s Index generum Avium. By Charles W. Richmond.
The Code .
32.5. Spellings that must be corrected (incorrect original spellings).
32.5.1. If there is in the original publication itself, without recourse to any external source of information, clear evidence of an inadvertent error, such as a lapsus calami or a copyist's or printer's error, it must be corrected. Incorrect transliteration or latinization, or use of an inappropriate connecting vowel, are not to be considered inadvertent errors.
That he changed the two names from Taphro to Tephro must count for something. I am not sure his calling it a lapsus triggers anything in 32.5.1.
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Old Friday 21st February 2014, 11:44   #9
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Heliomaster constantii leocadiae

Does anyone know the entomological origin of leocadiae http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt...53h/f146.image from Heliomaster constantii leocadiae? Ist it from greek mythology Leukothea (Λευκοθέα), "white goddess"?

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Friday 21st February 2014 at 11:45. Reason: Typo
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Old Friday 21st February 2014, 12:17   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
Does anyone know the entomological origin of leocadiae http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt...53h/f146.image from Heliomaster constantii leocadiae? Ist it from greek mythology Leukothea (Λευκοθέα), "white goddess"?
Female personal name? There is a St Leocadia, among others.

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Old Friday 21st February 2014, 19:12   #11
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In my MS I have:
"leocadiae Female eponym; dedication not given (Bourcier & Mulsant 1852, Ann. Sci. Phys. Nat. Agric. Ind. Soc. Royale Agric. Ind. Lyon, sér. 2, 4, 141)) ?Leocadia Weiss née Zorrilla (b. 1790- fl. 1860), maid, companion and lover to the artist Goya (subsp. Heliomaster constantii)."
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Old Saturday 22nd February 2014, 08:02   #12
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In the original description Boucier and Mulsant name a few birds and almost all of them have a dedication explaining who they were named for. But T. leocadiae has no dedication. I have found a 1915 book in Spanish that says Leocadia was the name of Boucier's wife. (Was she Ecuadorean?) Bourcier was the French consul to Ecuador from 1849 to 1850.
http://books.google.com/books?ei=wVc...me&q=Leocadia+ .

Last edited by mb1848 : Saturday 22nd February 2014 at 08:06.
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Old Saturday 22nd February 2014, 10:29   #13
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I am constantly stunned by the amount of information that is out there, and the dedication of our select band of BirdForum members! I also found quite a detailed life of Bourcier on a German website, and have amended my MS to;
"leocadiae Leocadia Bourcier (fl. 1850) wife of C. M. Jules Bourcier, French Consul-Gen. to Ecuador 1849-1850, and collector specialising in hummingbirds (subsp. Heliomaster constantii)."
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Old Saturday 22nd February 2014, 16:44   #14
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Question Leocadia or Léocadie?

Just speculating ... if so, I would guess her name to be: Léocadie, like in the French Name, used by Martial Étienne Mulsant himself in 1876, on he Humming-bird; "L'Héliomastre de Léocadie". See link: Histoire naturelle des oiseaux-mouches, ou, Colibris constituant la famille des trochilidés II

Good luck in any future research!

PS. On the other hand: Diccionario de los nombres de las aves de Colombia 2011 states that Jules Bourciers wife was named Aline!? Commemorated in Emerald-bellied Puffleg Eriocnemis alinae described by Bourcier himself 1842, whom ought to know!?

Well I don´t know ...

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 22nd February 2014 at 19:58. Reason: PS.
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Old Sunday 23rd February 2014, 16:30   #15
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His wife in 1843 was named Aline! We discussed it here:
http://www.birdforum.net/showthread....ighlight=Aline .
Perhaps Leocadia is a second wife? it is ten years after Aline.
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Old Sunday 23rd February 2014, 18:22   #16
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As already mentioned about Aline see http://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de...00000000000001 "Dédié à mon épouse." That means Aline and Léocadie would be nearly at the same time the wife of Bourcier. I can't believe it and don't know where the information in Boletín de la Dirección de estudios biológicos, Vol 1, 1915, p. 87 came from. I have some doubts. Léocadie might be a child from Mulsant or Bourcier. Who knows that there is a relation to Bourcier and not to Mulsant?

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Sunday 23rd February 2014 at 18:25.
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Old Monday 24th February 2014, 09:57   #17
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In 1816 Étienne Mulsant seem to have married his cousin Julie Ronchivole (15 years old at the time!) ... but what happened after that I don´t know.

They supposedly had at least six (name-less, to my knowledge) children.

Last edited by Calalp : Monday 24th February 2014 at 13:03.
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Old Tuesday 25th February 2014, 14:14   #18
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In fact there are seven children and they have names. See footnotes http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/i...e/370/mode/1up
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Old Tuesday 25th February 2014, 15:27   #19
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Thumbs up Well found, "Taphrospilus"!

"At least six" ... is easy ... was seven!

And clearly none was named Leocadia or Léocadie! I tend to think it might be a toponym ... though I haven´t checked this matter any deeper, and I will not do so (at least not in a forseeable future), I just happened to notice, and stumble upon, into, this thread ...

Though I would think it could be worth the effort to compare the names of the Mulsant kids with the many odd eponyms coined by Mulsant and Bourcier, in for example that four-volume Histoire naturelle des oiseaux-mouches, ou, Colibris constituant la famille des trochilidés (earlier this thread).

I get the feeling this might be the solution of some other hidden, shady eponyms!? Or not?

If anyone feel up to it, it´s a tricky task - Good luck!

On my behalf: Leocadiae ... Goodbye!
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Old Friday 7th March 2014, 22:00   #20
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Here in year 1861 Bourciers wife Benoîte-Aline-Jusserand http://books.google.de/books?id=2fLk...page&q&f=false registered a patent. (See 1535) Here http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/i...e/477/mode/1up you can see that Bourcier lived in the same house. If you search Bourcier here http://www.fondsenligne.archives-lyo...294b754&mode=3 you will see he married her 20/10/1820. So they have been married for at least 41 year. I have more and more doubts that ''leocadiae'' is Bourciers wife as mentioned in Rodolfo Alvarado: Los colibríes mexicanos. In: Boletin de la Direccion de Estudios Biologicos. Vol. 1, No. 1,1915, p. 87.
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Old Saturday 8th March 2014, 00:29   #21
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A wife to left hand?

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Old Saturday 8th March 2014, 08:48   #22
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Post I apparently couldn´t stay away from this thread ...

I still don´t understand why we cling on to any particular eponym. Why not a toponym?

There are at least two small villages/towns called Leocadio (Guerrero) in Central Mexico (in the vicinity where this subspecies is present), that could easily have been latinized to leocadiae and "Frenchified" to Léocadie ...

Couldn´t that "L'Héliomastre de Léocadie", as well, be interpreted as the "... from Léocadie/Leocadio"?

Or does the last sentence, in French (that I know very little of), from the type description (attached) indicates that it, with no doubt, has to be a eponym? "Cette espèce a de l'analogie avec ... "
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Old Saturday 8th March 2014, 10:04   #23
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Your comment make absoluetly sense. Unfortunatelly we do not know where the skin was collected and by whome.
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Old Saturday 8th March 2014, 10:44   #24
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My money is still on leocadiae being an eponym, which the French trochilidists were very fond of using. The toponymic forms would be leocadiensis or leocadianus. The final sentence of the original description refers to the bird's relationship to H. constantii (de Lattre, 1843) (of which it is now treated as a subspecies).
Thanks to your inputs, my MS finally reads:
aline Benoîte-Aline Bourcier née Jusserand (fl. 1860) wife of French diplomat and trochilidist C.-M. Jules Bourcier (Eriocnemis).

leocadiae Female eponym; dedication not given (Bourcier & Mulsant 1852, Ann. Sci. Phys. Nat. d'Agric. Ind., Soc. Nat., Lyon, sér 2, 4, 141) ("dedicado a Leocadia, esposa de Bourcier" (Alvarado 1915) (but see aline)) (subsp. Heliomaster constantii).
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Old Sunday 9th March 2014, 11:38   #25
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Post I rest my case ... and switch focus

Ok, James, it might be the case ... those French ornithologist's sure love their Women!

And while we´re stuck on Bourcier and Mulsant, let´s look at yet another Hummingbird of theirs ... first with a small correction of mine:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
In 1816 Étienne Mulsant seem to have married his cousin Julie Ronchivole (15 years old at the time!) ... but what happened after that I don´t know.
= Anne-Julie Mulsant, born Ronchevol (1801–1868) commmorated in Violet-bellied Hummingbird Damophila julie BOURCIER 1842 a k a "Julie's Hummingbird" ...

... but I wonder if that´s all, if she´s the only woman behind that name (regarding this particular Hummingbird)?!

See the attached pages (from Mulsant & Verreaux 1876). For me, with my limited knowledge of French, there seem to be quite a few, various(!) Julie's on this single species!?

Anyone knowing French feel up to explaining what all those Julie's on pp. 58-59 is/was all about? And what about the Poetry!?
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Last edited by Calalp : Sunday 9th March 2014 at 11:47.
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