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How To Nurse Baby Blue Jays????

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Old Thursday 23rd June 2005, 05:13   #1
Cathy C
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Question How To Nurse Baby Blue Jays????

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Hello....My name is Cathy and I have no idea how to make the fonts, etc. work here!! I am new here, and I have 2 baby blue jays I am not sure how to feed. I also just finished nursing and raising and releasing 2 red breasted robins..my first success in my entire life at actually saving one. I live in the blue Ridge Mountains in Va. and near the Shenandoah River. Each day I go outside and call the babies I raised, and today 2 white birds on the bottom landed in the tree over me and began squaking at me...and I have no clue why. Then, out of the corner of my eye, I saw in the yard a little thing with white...and as I walked down the hill this bird flew over me and landed in the tree near where I was. She gave me no problem picking up the baby, but seemed to get aggravated again once I got back to the porch and bird cage I still had out there. I looked back, and almost did not see there was another. After I picked this one up as well, she was fine. I do not know if they had seen me with the robins outside for a few days before I finally opened their door to free them or what, but I do know had I left them there cats would have killed them. I live in the woods, but in a small private development, and there are cats around. I raised the robins by soaking hard kitten food in the beginning in water, and then graduated to pouch food in juices and gravy and fed them with tweezers, until I finally stopped because I knew they could do it for themselves. These little ones seem to want to do nothing but sleep....I did get each of them to eat maybe a piece or 2. The robins were much more active at eating and demanding it, and I just am not sure what to feed these 2 babies. They have feathers, but no tail feathers. they cannot fly up onto a perch yet in the cage so I have them snuggled in a box tonight. I would really appreciate any advice from anyone who has raised baby blue jays, because I know they will be killed if I put them back outside. I have a cockatiel whom I let fly free in my home..tho he mostly stays on a curtain rod over the cage, where his food, ladders, etc. are built onto a wooden platform as he just did not like to get in his cage ever. So they will at least hear another bird...it seemed comforting to the robins. Thank you for the welcome to the group and any advice anyone can offer....Cathy C.[b][i]
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Old Thursday 23rd June 2005, 06:51   #2
Katy Penland
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Welcome to BirdForum, Cathy, from all of us on staff here.

The below is from the Virginia Wildlife Center's website. I don't know what city in VA you're in so can't help you with the phone number of the nearest bird rehabber.

If You Find A Baby Bird

Is the bird injured (bleeding, broken bones, puncture wounds, been in a cats mouth, open wounds, etc.)?
If YES, take the bird to your nearest wildlife veterinarian or rehabilitator.

If NO, see below.

Is the bird fully feathered?
If YES, any fully feathered baby bird found on the ground, seemingly unable to fly, is probably just fledging. If it appears to be uninjured, leave the area, and do your best to keep pets and children away from the bird. The parent(s) will not feed the youngster while people are around.

If NO, attempt to find the nest. An uninjured bird found on the ground with little or no feathers needs to be returned to the nest. Look around in trees and bushes to see if you can locate the nest. Correct identification of the nestling or of the parents will help locate the nest (i.e. bluebirds are box or cavity nesters, morning doves build basket nests on horizontal branches or in a tree fork).

Can you find the nest?
If YES, simply put the bird back. However, make sure the young are warm to the touch. If the baby is not, you can simply warm the bird in your hands before returning it to the nest. Returning a young cold bird to the nest will sometimes encourage the parent to push the baby out of the nest, as it is trying to remove a cold object away from other warm eggs and/ or young.

If the nest is unreachable, construct a substitute nest of a similar size and shape (margarine tubs with drain holes punched in the bottom and filled with grass make fine substitute nests) and securely attach it as close as possible to the original nest site. Contrary to popular belief, the parents will not be frightened off by your "scent" and will return to feed the baby if it calls for food. If you want to be sure the parent(s) will continue to feed the baby, watch the baby from a safe distance, preferably indoors. Do not be alarmed if you dont see the parent return. Typically wild animals will not return to the nest if you are visible and/ or in the area.

If NO, you cant find the nest, construct a substitute nest in the place where the nestling was found. Watch from indoors to see if a parent returns (be patient, it may not happen immediately). If a parent for more than half a day does not visit the nest, contact a licensed songbird rehabilitator for advice.


Please give baby birds the best possible chance for survival and leave them in the wild where they belong! Never attempt to treat or raise a baby bird on your own. Despite your best efforts, most hand-raised birds will die.


The best baby bird rehabilitation is prevention. Educate your friends, family, neighbors and yourselves about the fledging process. It is normal for birds at fledging to be on the ground unable to fly! Birds need several days up to four weeks, depending on their species, to learn how to fly and forage for food. One or more parent will feed them during this period. Know where nesting sites are located and keep cats and dogs indoors around the time you think the birds will fledge to avoid predation. Ask neighbors to take responsibility for their pets as well.


NOTE: Raising a wild bird in captivity is illegal unless you have both state and federal permits.
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Old Thursday 23rd June 2005, 12:53   #3
Cathy C
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[b][i]Thank you Katy~I am just afraid of the cats that are near and constantly looking for birds, etc. But if it is best I take them back outside I will do so as they are not as open to eating from me as the robins were....Cathy C.
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Old Friday 28th April 2006, 02:45   #4
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I have the same exact problem, we have a fledgeling blue jay that was just denested tonight, several cats gathering around and no defense for the little thing. Thanks for the tip on the nesting box. Ours has both tail feathers and full feathering on the wings and rest of the body. I've heard to feed cooked/boiled hamburger and dog or cat food but am unsure of any of these. Was considering some ground up earthworms. Are tweezers the best method of feeding? What about water? Do we put a small dish in with him? So many questions????? Hope someone has some answers.
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Old Friday 28th April 2006, 05:11   #5
Iris Kristina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Renata61
I have the same exact problem, we have a fledgeling blue jay that was just denested tonight, several cats gathering around and no defense for the little thing. Thanks for the tip on the nesting box. Ours has both tail feathers and full feathering on the wings and rest of the body. I've heard to feed cooked/boiled hamburger and dog or cat food but am unsure of any of these. Was considering some ground up earthworms. Are tweezers the best method of feeding? What about water? Do we put a small dish in with him? So many questions????? Hope someone has some answers.
When I was feeding birds by hand I had to give them also water (small drops) by hand. They can not use water dishes as the indoor /cage birds are used to. Also very important always to feed very small protions, to start at dawn and do it in intervals the whole day through. I feeded a combination of local food, that the species uses and with the time started to switch to food supplies which were easear to get, but still somehow similar. For example very very small portions of liver insted of worms, berries etc. But it has to accord to the tipe of bird you are hand feeding.

Also not to forget to keep them warm at night. With the magpies (which were still without feathers) we made good experience keepeng them warm in holding our hand over them the whole night. It wasn't simple but we (our family) succeded in growing them up. Usually they have fallen out of their nests and we saved them from cats....

I just can report you about my experiences, but I don't know the tipe of bird you have. So you have to ajust it to your tipe of bird. But maybe my experiences can give you some hints how to get the solution.

In our family it has been always more or less a whole family project, because nobody has time the whole day througt, but the birds do need that.

Good luck!

Iris
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Old Friday 28th April 2006, 05:29   #6
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Hi, Renata, I see this is your first post so a warm welcome to you from all of us on staff here at BirdForum.

Iris's well-meaning advice notwithstanding, in the United States, it is illegal to keep or raise a wild (e.g., federally protected) bird unless you have the proper rehab permits. Please read the above post #2 and call a local rehabber or vet tomorrow. It's your baby bird's best chance for survival in the wild.
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Old Friday 28th April 2006, 12:17   #7
Renata61
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Katy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katy Penland
Hi, Renata, I see this is your first post so a warm welcome to you from all of us on staff here at BirdForum.

Iris's well-meaning advice notwithstanding, in the United States, it is illegal to keep or raise a wild (e.g., federally protected) bird unless you have the proper rehab permits. Please read the above post #2 and call a local rehabber or vet tomorrow. It's your baby bird's best chance for survival in the wild.
I called my best friend who is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and she is so overrun with infants right now that she told me she was appointing me the foster care of the baby jay. She also gave me some good instructions on feeding and care of the little thing. Thanks for your welcome. The baby jay is eating chopped up young crickets and small drops of water and is happily nested down in an old bowl. He has such a voice!! Thanks for your advice.
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Old Friday 28th April 2006, 15:42   #8
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That's great, Renata. I'm glad you were able to get ahold of a local professional for help. Please keep us posted on how your young charge fares, will you?
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Old Friday 28th April 2006, 22:27   #9
Renata61
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Update On Baby Jay

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Originally Posted by Katy Penland
That's great, Renata. I'm glad you were able to get ahold of a local professional for help. Please keep us posted on how your young charge fares, will you?
Well so far so good. Do they sleep alot after being fed? I chopped up some earthworms for him and gave him some more water. He's happily snoozing in his nesting bowl right now and he's making these little chirping noises in his sleep. All throughout the day it's been the same. He definately will let me know that he is hungry by screaming and opening his mouth when I come near. It's quite endearing. I hope he continues doing so well. I just hope I'm doing the right thing, though my friend who has experience with birds says I am. She also gave me some vitamin powder for baby birds that I coated the earthworms with.
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Old Saturday 29th April 2006, 23:27   #10
TinaD-Florida
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HELP - 2 Baby Blue Jays and lots of Cats

Please send me suggestions for the feeding the baby blue jays--unfortunately it is an incredibly windy day and the nest must be high in the tree. There are lots of cats around (good hunters too--they caught a small heron or bittern yesterday). Too late in weekend to get "professional" help. Per suggestions above, unless we hear of other suggestions, we will smash up earthworms or crickets and add a tad of water and droplet them into the birds mouths--they did not even run away from us--they just opened their mouths and squaked--they are hungry lil' ones. When we participated in the squirrel rescue after the hurricanes last year, we fed them every couple hours--I assume we'll do the same with these lil ones too?

Thank you anyone for your input, but please spare me the response about the professionals--we'll call them once they are available during business hours.

Last edited by TinaD-Florida : Saturday 29th April 2006 at 23:31.
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Old Wednesday 10th May 2006, 20:31   #11
oksana zussman
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Hi Kathy,

We had a nest of 4 blue jays and were witnessing the whole process. The other day we saw three fledglings. One was on the ground, two up above. Parents are continuously attending to them but the large number of crows is making their survival practically impossible. Parents are continuously attacking the crows and this morning I had to run out of the house only to find one of the flrdgings on the ground, on his back. he doesn't seem to be hurt, I have it in a box inside, afraid to take it out knowing the crows are watching carefully. I know the other fledglings must be out there and today spent the whole day, trying to scare the crows away.

I thought of buying a birdcage and putting it outside with the baby in it. This way the parents might feed the little thing, but the predators won't get to it.

Kindly let me know if this is something that could work. I am not sure now how to feed the fledgling - it's quite grown up, but can't fly still. Was jumping in the box for a while and now sits quietly.

Please give me any possible advise for this situation.

Thank you,

Oksana
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Old Wednesday 10th May 2006, 21:34   #12
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Hi, Oksana, and welcome to BirdForum from all of us on staff here.

The info page that I quoted above, and which is also available at the link below, is the best advice any of us can give you or anyone else finding newly fledged birds. Please read it carefully and follow its instructions.

http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=36564

As I don't know where in California you're located, I can't help you with trying to find a local vet or rehabilitation person. Best to look in your phone book or even google your area to get professional help.
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Old Friday 19th May 2006, 17:31   #13
keith richter
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Unhappy I nursed a blue jay once

i nursed a blue jay once, and a mocking bird. but i dindn't know what to feed him the blue jay was hurt but it was serious injured. it passed becuse it was to hurt!!! KEITH RICHTER
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Old Saturday 20th May 2006, 00:18   #14
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what a vet told me about this baby blue jay

My sister saw a snake hanging down from a tree near her 2 small children out in the country. She wasn't sure if the snake was poisonous or not but anyway, long story shorter, she chose to destroy the snake.
Well, I am an animal lover and went on to tell her this and that and some snakes help us out with problems, yada yada. We went inside her house to visit, then later we go outside and there is a little baby blue jay in the same area as the snake she had earlier tried to point out, that she had destroyed. He had feathers and his mouth wide open, he did not look too good. Like just in trauma. I scooped him up and headed to my house, had kids to pick up and I have raised all sorts of animals in crisis like this little bluejay.
But before I left, my sister wanted to show me the snake she had killed earlier that day before I had come over. We noticed two lumps in the snake.
I got a call from my sister, later after I got home and she had actually cut open the snake to see what he had ate and yes, it was two little blue jays just like this one here in my home. That explained everything and she had found pieces of what looked like a torn up nest strewn around. The snake had got the two other baby blue jays and was probably coming down after this one that fell out of the nest.
I talked to a vetrinarian we know and he said to feed the baby blue jay some cooked oatmeal with milk and I asked him about water and he said a little bottled water, no tap (chemicals).
Well, I have fed him some oatmeal about 4 times now, he lets me know when he is hungry,lol. And he has really perked up and doing great. Sitting on my shoulder as I type this.
Some of us out here don't worry about the FEDS busting in over a baby blue jay. They are busy with more serious issues than an animal lover like me that rescued a baby bird.
If I would have left the baby blue jay there, it would be dead by now, no doubt, it was near death when I found it this morning.
Lots of wild cats roaming around and one was waiting to pounce on this little guy, when we walked up and saw him on the ground.
This baby blue jay has quite a few feathers but not enough to fly yet, probably another week or two.
I'm not licensed but my family knows how to help nature along sometimes.
I have 44 years of experience, and it's not like we are running a meth lab here or something like that.
I doubt God or this bird care if I am licensed to do anything but give him a little food and love after a very traumatic experience.
We have lots of time and love for this baby bird, other places licensed are overcrowded sometimes and I think this little guy deserves alot of TLC.
I once found a great horned owl that had been run over on a dirt road in Kansas. I thought it was dead and picked it up and just marveled at the beauty. Luckily I picked him up with a towel. Then his eyes slowly opened and I quickly wrapped the towel tighter.
Took him home and fed and watered him and nursed him back to health for a week, then set him free. He was awesome and I swear it was that same owl that stayed right there on our property for awhile.
Sometimes we have a chance to help out and people like me and others, step in and do our part.
Last time I tried an animal rescue place for an orphaned dove we found, it was a rats race and nobody wanted to take the dove. I fed the dove and released it in a few weeks and I'm sure that dove did just fine.
So for me, cooked oatmeal with some milk, wait for the baby blue jays little squawky noise and I feed him.
Good luck to the others that asked for advise!
Sherry



Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaD-Florida
Please send me suggestions for the feeding the baby blue jays--unfortunately it is an incredibly windy day and the nest must be high in the tree. There are lots of cats around (good hunters too--they caught a small heron or bittern yesterday). Too late in weekend to get "professional" help. Per suggestions above, unless we hear of other suggestions, we will smash up earthworms or crickets and add a tad of water and droplet them into the birds mouths--they did not even run away from us--they just opened their mouths and squaked--they are hungry lil' ones. When we participated in the squirrel rescue after the hurricanes last year, we fed them every couple hours--I assume we'll do the same with these lil ones too?

Thank you anyone for your input, but please spare me the response about the professionals--we'll call them once they are available during business hours.
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Old Saturday 20th May 2006, 07:02   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherbear44
But before I left, my sister wanted to show me the snake she had killed earlier that day before I had come over. We noticed two lumps in the snake.
I got a call from my sister, later after I got home and she had actually cut open the snake to see what he had ate and yes, it was two little blue jays just like this one here in my home. That explained everything and she had found pieces of what looked like a torn up nest strewn around. The snake had got the two other baby blue jays and was probably coming down after this one that fell out of the nest.
Yep, that's what snakes do. They have to survive, too, and birds are part of their prey.


Quote:
I talked to a vetrinarian we know and he said to feed the baby blue jay some cooked oatmeal with milk and I asked him about water and he said a little bottled water, no tap (chemicals).
Thank you for talking to a veterinarian for advice on how to care for a wild bird chick. Did your vet also advise you to take this bird to a rehabber once you'd given it some food and put it in a warm, safe place?


Quote:
Some of us out here don't worry about the FEDS busting in over a baby blue jay. They are busy with more serious issues than an animal lover like me that rescued a baby bird.
"Some of us out here"? Since when isn't Texas part of the US? Whether you yourself choose to honor the federal protections that are in place is up to you, but your love for animals doesn't give you -- or any of us animal lovers -- special dispensation.

Most people who have eggs, chicks and fledglings are completely at sea as to what to do with them -- don't even know what species they are. This is why our first advice is to call a local professional and then to let them know that they cannot keep a federally protected species without the proper licenses. This is, after all, for the birds' protection, not ours. I wonder how many hundreds if not thousands of chicks and fledglings suffer days- or weeks-long, painful deaths each year because soft-hearted people feed them the wrong things or feed them improperly?


Quote:
I have 44 years of experience, and it's not like we are running a meth lab here or something like that. I doubt God or this bird care if I am licensed to do anything but give him a little food and love after a very traumatic experience.
I don't know what running a meth lab has to do with anything. As for God, didn't he say "Render unto Caesar..."? That would be our federal government, in modern parlance.


Quote:
Good luck to the others that asked for advise!
The best advice is to call a local vet or rehabber -- which is what we urge our members to do -- not get hand-feeding instructions off an internet site, even one as good as BirdForum.
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Old Thursday 1st June 2006, 00:38   #16
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Smile Two baby blue jays need your help!

Late this evening I rescued two baby blue jays that fell out of a nest ... apparently they were in the treetops that were carefully checked before work started today. Three huge oaks, each over 45 feet tall, were being taken down because they were diseased and in preparation for the hurricane season . Somehow the climber missed the nest ... these two are babies and have a very fine covering of feathers ... I am giving them the oatmeal mixture every hour or so and they seem to be sleeping a lot still. They are in a small cage which I plan to hang in the trees outside of the screened porch during the daytime in case the parents are around ... but to save them from racoons and cats etc. at night, I will keep them protected. Is the oatmeal mixture better than the dog/cat food softened with water for feeding? How long and how often should I feed them .... and when can I let them out on their own?

There is no wildlife refuge close to my area so rather than let these fledglings be at risk I plan to care for them until they are strong enough to be on their own.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.
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Old Friday 9th June 2006, 22:34   #17
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Hi everyone. I also need help with this. I was at a clients house grooming there Labradoodles when I was about to leave saw this little bird jumping around on the ground. I jumped up and grabbed him before he got pounced by 5 Labradoodles that would of loved to have him for lunch. Tryed to find a nest but coulden't find one so put him in a box and went to the feed store where they have baby chicks etc. The lady told me at the desk to do everyone a favor and throw the "damn" thing in a field and let it die. She told me she hated Blue Jays. Anyway I told her I couldent do that and I needed some mealworms. I bought 3 dozen and brought him home. I tryed to give him a whole one but he wasn't gettig the idea of it so I cut it for him and put it in his mouth which I got him to take 2 full size meal worms. He has most feathers and sounds after reading this that he is one of those Fledge Blue Jay babies. Anyway, I could care less if the FBI comes a knockin on my door for me saving a baby blue jay. The media would have a field day if that happend where I live so I don't want to hear it. All I want to do is help this baby bird. I am wondering how many times I should feed him a day and how many mealworms can a baby this size eat. I don't want to over feed him but don't want to under feed him either. Instead of trying to lecture does anyone know the answer to this. WTG Sherry for saving that little bird. I beleive everyone should do what they can to save what they can!

Thanks,
Brandi

News..Ok he is now eating 2-4 worms every 3 hours. He is getting them down whole with some effort. Does this sound normal? Hes a great little bird and sits on my finger and calls to me now when I pass his cage.

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Old Friday 30th June 2006, 04:10   #18
rudfinlsn88
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The orphan jay I have been raising for 10 days eats blue berries, cherries, grapes and cat food. He strongly prefers the beef cat food. He will stay with me until I can find an official rehabber. Its that or kill him. I would like advice - different foods others have had success giving to Jays.
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Old Monday 21st May 2007, 02:12   #19
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I saved a fledgling blue jay from a busy street and he lived for a week. He ate well from morning until night and slept on my chest, and it broke my heart when he went into spasms one night and died. But I just wanted to say, government or no government, I know that little bird would have been smashed by a car if I hadn't picked him up. At least he had one comfortable week. BTW, it makes me laugh to think of the OSBI arresting people for raising blue jays. Those guys would sooner run over a songbird than try to save it.

P.S. Before I get slammed: I called a veterinarian who gave me instructions which I followed to the LETTER about how to care for the fledgling. He couldn't take the bird, and he told me there were no local agencies who could take him, either. Basically, he said it was up to me.

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Old Tuesday 12th June 2007, 03:31   #20
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I feed abandoned baby blue jays dog food chunks soaked in water. I use blunt ended tweezers and offer small bites of food, it's not necessary to poke the tweezers down the throat as they will go after the food. Feed every 30 minutes until bird becomes a fledgling then about every hour. Getting the tongue caught in the tweezers can be a problem so be careful.

Don't worry about over-feeding, the bird will stop eating when full. Avoid feeding worms or live insects as this will cause an internal parasite problem for the animal. As the bird grows and can get about within it's cage begin introducing small bites of fruits, nuts, and seeds. I've seen jays amuse themselves between feedings with these offerings. They do get bored when confined but try to resist handling them anymore than you must.

Remember, your job as the caretaker is to prepare the bird for a successful release. This also means keeping a bowl of water in the cage; bathing induces preening which will waterproof the feathers. You can put pebbles and rocks in the water bowl to prevent drowning when the bird is small.

Provide a good area for practice flying. The bird needs to exercise its wings to prepare for outdoor life. We take our birds outside and allow them to practice and scratch around on the ground. Don't release the bird too early. Make sure it has a good tail growth. Also treat the bird for mites before release to avoid mite molt which can end in the birds death from overexposure in some areas.

One other thing, keep the bird's area clean. That means change the lining of the cage at least twice daily and provide things for the bird to play with, as I said, they do get very bored.

If I can be of further help please email me.
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Old Tuesday 12th June 2007, 16:41   #21
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For those of you with baby birds, please consult a wildlife rehabilitator in your area for information regarding raising baby birds. Please stop feeding your baby birds ground beef, cat food, dog food, or bread. These foods do not contain the proper nutrition needed to raise baby birds. I want to prevent this from spreading any further. Wildlife rehabilitation has made huge strides in rearing and raising orphaned baby wildlife. Gone are the days of experiementation of diets and care. Although there is always some new to learn, the wildlife centers network and learn from each other (nationally sometimes).

There is baby bird formula at your local pet store or feed store that is more nutritionally correct, than what I have seen on this thread.
Please check the internet for a local rehabilitator. If you are from california, we now have a hotline number for wildlife questions. Please understand that raising native bird species is not legal and you must have a license to raise baby wildlife. If you are all interested in learning how to raise baby birds, please contact your local wildlife rehabilitator they would love to have the additional help and you can learn how to raise passerines legally.

For Southern Calif. wildlife hotline: 866-945-3911
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Old Thursday 14th June 2007, 03:53   #22
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My reply was to those who have no intention of becoming a wildlife rehabilitator on a larger scale than trying to save that poor bird who has fallen from the nest or has been abandoned for whatever reason by its natural caretaker.

I have personally raised many a wild bird on the formula I quoted and they have done more than well. Some still remain on the property and have lived to raise their own little offspring. I once worked for a rather large company that trained wildlife for films. Our vets advised the same formula I advised in this thread. When you're out in the woods, miles from the nearest vet trying to save a wild bird, your dogs food works just fine, matter of fact it works just fine in any case. Our newest jay is almost ready to fly the coop and he's in great shape. I look forward to releasing him back into the wild and taking satisfaction in a job well done.
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Old Friday 15th June 2007, 01:21   #23
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I would like to say WELL DONE to Birdsanction! and you are the 1st person that I found on the internet that actually had some help to offer in caring for baby blue jays.
As for Ayasuda's comment about bird formula at the petshop, it is NOT more nutritionally correct for many soft billed birds. However, I would make sure to add some avian vitamins and calcium to the softened dog food or whatever you feed the baby. Also, as for wildlife rehabilitators, at least in my area wont accept all species of birds(like European Starlings), so I end up raising some every year.
Not sure if this recipe is quite right for blue-jays but this is what I feed my Starlings.
1/2 cup puppy food(high in protein) that has been soaked in water (till soft)
1 hard biled egg
1/2 tbs applesauce
(occasionally I add a couple teaspoons of baby food sweet potatoes or green beans for vitamin A)
+ a little calcium and bird vitamins

Since bluejays are omnivores like Starlings their diet might be the same
I also feed mealworms a crickets to my babies, that I get from my local petshop. I usually like to get these when the baby is about to fledge or when I'm trying to get the baby to eat on its own. I don't feed earthworms to my starlings because of parasite reasons (even though some baby birds, like robins, are able to eat earthworms)
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Old Wednesday 11th July 2007, 03:56   #24
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Hello fellow fowl lovers!

Clearly these baby blue jays are having their way with us and I am no exception! I stumbled across a baby one at the bottom of a tree with no nest in sight. When he tries to move foward he falls on his face and forgive my ignorance (I am only a bird watcher) but I really am not sure if its his leg or his wing that's a problem. The wing does look a bit crooked, but then so does his leg; both in fact. Oh bother! I want to take him back but there is no way I'm going to climb those unyielding trees in search of his nest! The Wildlife guys gave me a number that reverted me to a raptor rehabilitaor who sent me to a number whose recording sends me back to the wildlife guys who eventually said I should have left it to die and should take it to a vet to get it put down! Woah! So... he seems to be getting stronger and he now seems to be giving the other wing a bit more of a flap. Any idea of how soon I can take him back to his tree? Oh, and will he become squirrel or hawk food before I get home? That would be sad but I can only do so much for him having never rasied birds before. He really is cute and I think he called me "Mom" today when I was feeding him , or maybe he just said "more". Thanks Birdsantion, your advice really helped.
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Old Wednesday 11th July 2007, 18:05   #25
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Nature is not about 100% survival. May seem cruel at times, but it is still better to allow baby birds to fledge naturally and without human interferance. The adult birds are capable of taking care of & feeding their own young, if we humans just let well enough alone. Yes, some may be lost during the fledging process (predators & scavengers need to eat too)... but that is natures way.

Many times, taking an otherwise healthy wild animal/bird into captivity is the surest way of killing it. Please think twice about attempting to 'rescue' a fledgling bird from the wild. And if you feel that it is absolutely necessary and appropriate in a given situation, then please promptly turn that animal/bird over to a licensed, genuinely knowledgable rehab.
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