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anthus rubescens

  1. American Pipit, Stillhouse Hollow Lake.jpg

    American Pipit, Stillhouse Hollow Lake.jpg

    American Pipit (Anthus rubescens rubescens)
  2. American Pipit

    American Pipit

    Formerly merged with Water Pipit. Note the reduced ventral streaking and buff underparts suggesting that this individual is starting to molt into breeding plumage. This species goes under the name Buff-bellied Pipit in European literature but in winter they lack the buff-colored underparts...
  3. American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit (Anthus rubescens rubescens)
  4. American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit (Anthus rubescens rubescens)
  5. American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit (Anthus rubescens rubescens)
  6. American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit.jpg

    American Pipit (Anthus rubescens rubescens)
  7. American Pipit

    American Pipit

    American Pipit (Anthus rubescens) Sexes similar. Margin of Stillhouse Hollow Lake in Rivers Bend Park, southwest of Belton, Bell County, Texas, USA. A crossroads of the Edwards Plateau and the Blackland Prairies Vegetational Areas. Elevation ca. 192 m (630 ft) elevation.
  8. Buff-bellied Pipit

    Buff-bellied Pipit

    Buff-bellied Pipit (Anthus rubescens subsp. rubescens) Non-breeding plumage. Sexes similar. One of our winter visitors. Photographed at Veterans Park, College Station, Brazos County, Texas, USA. Open bermuda grass fields (atheletic fields) with pooling water at ca. 72 m (237 ft) elevation.
  9. American Pipit

    American Pipit

  10. Buff-bellied Pipit

    Buff-bellied Pipit

    Buff-bellied Pipit (Anthus rubescens subsp. rubescens) Non-breeding plumage. Sexes similar. Photographed at Veterans Park, College Station, Texas. Open bermuda grass fields (atheletic fields) with pooling water at ca. 72 m (237 ft) elevation.
  11. Buff-bellied Pipit

    Buff-bellied Pipit

    Buff-bellied Pipit (Anthus rubescens rubescens) It is also known as the American Pipit and in the past has been erroneously called the Water Pipit in the USA. Five subspecies have been described with one subspecies consistently being placed in synonym leaving four recognized subspecies. Only...
  12. American Pipit wintering

    American Pipit wintering

    belong to the Motacillidae family, which means "those who move their tails" for its habit of moving the head and tail when feeding like doves, spend all their time on the ground feeding on insects, in the summer live in alpine grasslands and tundra, and so he love to walk by this...
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