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12 power recommendation wanted (1 Viewer)

71North

Member
Another vote for the Canon 12x36 is III.
Flat field, ok’ish afov, quite light & compact.
Also sharp & contrasty. However, the stabilization is what will leave other binos in the dust. You’ll be able to resolve distant detail no untethered alpha bin could ever aspire to.
 

Thotmosis

Well-known member
Netherlands
Im very satisfied with my Leica Duovid 8-12x42. Works great for distant marine traffic and raptors. Not the latest and the greatest but good quality and affordable on the used marked.
 

rdfish1

Well-known member
Lots of great input folks, thank you. I ended up ordering a new but discounted pair of vortex vipers after considering all of the above. Ultimately, I traded down in terms of my original budget bc these will be specialty, limited use binoculars. Plus, i hear the warnings re stability challenges and want to make sure 12s will be something I can live with. There popularity is modest so limiting my investment seemed wise, and unless I stepped up meaningfully more, it seemed like most of the offerings in the 500-900 ish were pretty close in performance. The vt diamondback with the new release and HD glass seems to have sclosed the gap between them and the viper but I still saw enough advantages to pay a little extra for the vipers, or so I think.
 

Thotmosis

Well-known member
Netherlands
Lots of great input folks, thank you. I ended up ordering a new but discounted pair of vortex vipers after considering all of the above. Ultimately, I traded down in terms of my original budget bc these will be specialty, limited use binoculars. Plus, i hear the warnings re stability challenges and want to make sure 12s will be something I can live with. There popularity is modest so limiting my investment seemed wise, and unless I stepped up meaningfully more, it seemed like most of the offerings in the 500-900 ish were pretty close in performance. The vt diamondback with the new release and HD glass seems to have sclosed the gap between them and the viper but I still saw enough advantages to pay a little extra for the vipers, or so I think.
Hope you enjoy your new Viper, please post your experiences!
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
Lots of great input folks, thank you. I ended up ordering a new but discounted pair of vortex vipers after considering all of the above. Ultimately, I traded down in terms of my original budget bc these will be specialty, limited use binoculars. Plus, i hear the warnings re stability challenges and want to make sure 12s will be something I can live with. There popularity is modest so limiting my investment seemed wise, and unless I stepped up meaningfully more, it seemed like most of the offerings in the 500-900 ish were pretty close in performance. The vt diamondback with the new release and HD glass seems to have sclosed the gap between them and the viper but I still saw enough advantages to pay a little extra for the vipers, or so I think.
Good choice. 12x can be challenging to hold steady without a tripod or monopod, but they will show you a lot of detail. Enjoy them!
 

Blue72

Well-known member
I have a set of Maven 12x42 that I use to observe the coast in my backyard. I’m surprised how well I can handhold them. This is coming from a guy who mostly uses 7x binoculars for its extra stability

I use the 12x for observing wildlife 1-2 miles away. mounted on a tripod, it extends the view even further
 

yarrellii

Well-known member
Supporter
I had the current Viper HD in 10x50 and think very highly of them, great performance for the price and backed by a great warranty, I hope you enjoy them.
As for 12x, I've tried a series of 12, I liked the form factor of the Monarch 5 12x42, in spite of their lightness I think it allowed for a pretty stable grip. However, it was only when I finally "gave in" to IS that I fully enjoyed 12x and finally found what I was looking for in terms of long distance reach. I'm mainly a 7x - 8x user, and 10x has never given me a significant improvement over those, but 12x IS really makes a difference. Another vote for IS in 12x, in my case, 12x36 IS III
 

yarrellii

Well-known member
Supporter
I also recommend the Canon 12x36 iii is binoculars they are amazing.
It was not until I tried 12x with image stabilization that I truly appreciated all the details that 12x can provide. So much so, that even when I'm using a regular 8x now I miss the IS button, since I know that I would gain a great deal of detail. So to think that you can have 12x with more stability (hence detail) than a 8x simply blows my mind. Yes it does have a number of drawbacks (a large number, for that) but when it's about extracting details, I think only a tripod-mounted binocular could be a contender.
 

Stu57

Well-known member
United Kingdom
It was not until I tried 12x with image stabilization that I truly appreciated all the details that 12x can provide. So much so, that even when I'm using a regular 8x now I miss the IS button, since I know that I would gain a great deal of detail. So to think that you can have 12x with more stability (hence detail) than a 8x simply blows my mind. Yes it does have a number of drawbacks (a large number, for that) but when it's about extracting details, I think only a tripod-mounted binocular could be a contender.
Hi

I totally agree the 12x magnification definitely brings a lot more details then 8x or 10x bins. When I am using my 12x36 I never bother taking my scope out they are more then enough for distance stuff really good views.
 

kestrel1

Well-known member
I opted for 12x due little more detail, but unless image stabilized ones, 12x are more-less suitable for watching from static observation site where you can sit and use some kind of support to minimize shakes. When you are in this quiet observation post, birds forgot you are there or there is any danger from you, so it allows you to catch very n ice moments, especially when watching birds on the lakes, raptors high in sky or species which not allow you to get close, the 12x pay off.
Then depends on how sensitive you are to CA, as this is also important to take into account, since with 12x it gets more pronounced and can disturb the enjoyment. I had EL SV 12x (which are great, but I am that type of guy who see CA even in them) now have Meostars HD (which I find very good in terms of CA correction, yet lacking the huge field and some EL SV advantages), If budget allows than I will opt for NLs probably
 

AlanFrench

Well-known member
I've never been able to hold 12x binoculars steady enough to enjoy and take full advantage of the extra magnification, but I used a pair of Canon 12x36 IS IIs for about 16 years as my main birding glass. Because of their poor close focus, which sometimes caused problems, I replaced them with the newer Canon 12x32 IS about 3 years ago, and I have been very happy with them.

Clear skies, Alan
 

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