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3 Bird IDs, Louisville Kentucky (1 Viewer)

ltshears

Well-known member
I'm back with some new photos i took in my yard..

I would like ID on the 2 small birds and the raptor...

Thanks

Trish
 

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BigRedBirder

Active member
The two small birds look like female and male, respectively, House Finchs.

The raptor looks like a juvenile Accipiter, but not sure what kind.
 

ltshears

Well-known member
BigRedBirder said:
The two small birds look like female and male, respectively, House Finchs.

The raptor looks like a juvenile Accipiter, but not sure what kind.


Accipiter???????? Which one? I went to look it up and there is about 30 different kinds.. lol

Thanks
Trish
 

B Lagopus

Voler
Interesting juvenile accipiter!

The head is smallish and rounded, the bill is smallish, the legs are on the thin and small side, and the "expression" is gentle (for an accipiter). All those factors indicate Sharp-shinned Hawk.

However... no supercilium, or maybe just a hint of a tawny one, which are usually Cooper's Hawk characteristics... and while the density and thickness of the upper streaks are good for Sharpie, the flank and belly plumage is essentially unbarred, which is another Cooper's characteristic.

There is an almost complete overlap on plumage with juveniles, and structure trumps plumage, so I will vote for juvenile Accipiter striatus velox (Sharpie). Don't suppose you have any other photos, particularly ones showing the tail?
 

ltshears

Well-known member
B Lagopus said:
Interesting juvenile accipiter!

The head is smallish and rounded, the bill is smallish, the legs are on the thin and small side, and the "expression" is gentle (for an accipiter). All those factors indicate Sharp-shinned Hawk.

However... no supercilium, or maybe just a hint of a tawny one, which are usually Cooper's Hawk characteristics... and while the density and thickness of the upper streaks are good for Sharpie, the flank and belly plumage is essentially unbarred, which is another Cooper's characteristic.

There is an almost complete overlap on plumage with juveniles, and structure trumps plumage, so I will vote for juvenile Accipiter striatus velox (Sharpie). Don't suppose you have any other photos, particularly ones showing the tail?

Thank you for your help.. I only have one other photo before it flew away.. I think you can possibly see the underside of the tail but that's it..

I will attach it.
 

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JANJ

Well-known member

AlexC

Aves en Los Ángeles
Opus Editor
Supporter
Just for future reassurance, ltshears, you don't have to worry about all Accipiters - there are only 3 species that reside in the US - Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus, your bird), Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii), and Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis). Nice Sharpie shot, by the way!
 

ltshears

Well-known member
accipiters

overworkedirish said:
Just for future reassurance, ltshears, you don't have to worry about all Accipiters - there are only 3 species that reside in the US - Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus, your bird), Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii), and Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis). Nice Sharpie shot, by the way!

Thanks , i guess that would help next time.. lol.. As you can tell i don't know alot about identifying birds and am farily new to bird watching...
 

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