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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

3-D view (1 Viewer)

dries1

Member
Can someone explain what is meant when someone who views a flat field binocular sees a 3-D view, this description has been used frequently on here and I need some explanation/understanding of this phenomenon.
 

jcnguyen09

Well-known member
Please spare me of the technicalities! here I just try to explain by my own experiences. I happened to have my home office facing the ranges of high mountains outside of a large windows! not just one mountain but a ranges of mountains cascaded one after anothers. By human eyes, in the summers it seems like it is just a high, big mountain covered with green trees. However, until you look thru a binoculars, you then see the dozen of large, small mountains peaks cascaded each others to make the whole view. Furthermore, amazing that each binoculars gives a different shape, different form and sometimes, you thought viewing different scenes, all due to the 3-D effects of the viewing devices, the binoculars. My experiences:

The Leica NV produced the best, spectacular most beautiful color rendition view, the 3-D effect depth, distances between each mountain peaks and ranges can be distinctly recognized! The beauty of the Leica color rendition is unbeatable! Shortfalls on the Leica: somewhat narrow FOV/AFOV and fuzzy toward the edges.

Swarovski NL and SF : 3-D effects is very close to the Leica in term of depth of the pictures, NL: sharp to the edges and much deeper sharpness depth of views that somewhat caused the less distinction among the mountain peaks and separated lines of the ranges. Color renditions pretty much the sames (NL and latest SF) with a hint of greenest on the SF.

EL and Nikon EDG: The view is severely effected by the originally invention of flat field technology that caused the views look like a 2-D posters, especially for the nearby objects. Looking at a tree about 50-100 fts away, it looks like a picture of a tree on the poster and the branches lookalike a flat leave or flower that was pressed and kept on a book for a while.

Just my 2 cents, hope that would answer your question somewhat!
 
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dries1

Member
No not really, but thanks. I think this thread should be closed, sorry to have introduced it, it will just lead to further confusion.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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