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8x56 SLC (1 Viewer)

Tringa45

Well-known member
Europe
I posted some initial impressions here https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=392820 but have since read comments questioning its suitability for birding.

Admittedly, that was also my initial impression but I would revise that opinion now. It dwarfs a 42 mm binocular, but at 1225 g it is only about 50% heavier than an average example and is not a serious burden when carried for an hour or two. To put things into perspective, I am probably one of the oldest members on the forum (past my sell-by date as Binastro put it) and am no longer fit, so I think anyone who considers it too heavy is either exaggerating or has a serious skeletal problem.

I replaced Swarovski's strap contraption with a simple one from Niggeloh (allegedly the original supplier to Leica, Swarovski and Zeiss), which was radically shortened so that it just passes over my head. Who needs harnesses?

At New Moon I took it down to the Star Park in the Eifel (about 70 km SW of Cologne), where there is relatively little light pollution and had some magnificent views of the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. Should I ever be asked the silly question how far I can see with it, the answer would be, "Only about two and a half millon light years." ;)

John
 

PeterPS

MEMBER
I posted some initial impressions here https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=392820 but have since read comments questioning its suitability for birding.

Admittedly, that was also my initial impression but I would revise that opinion now. It dwarfs a 42 mm binocular, but at 1225 g it is only about 50% heavier than an average example and is not a serious burden when carried for an hour or two. To put things into perspective, I am probably one of the oldest members on the forum (past my sell-by date as Binastro put it) and am no longer fit, so I think anyone who considers it too heavy is either exaggerating or has a serious skeletal problem.

I replaced Swarovski's strap contraption with a simple one from Niggeloh (allegedly the original supplier to Leica, Swarovski and Zeiss), which was radically shortened so that it just passes over my head. Who needs harnesses?

At New Moon I took it down to the Star Park in the Eifel (about 70 km SW of Cologne), where there is relatively little light pollution and had some magnificent views of the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. Should I ever be asked the silly question how far I can see with it, the answer would be, "Only about two and a half millon light years." ;)

John

John,
If you can carry 1225g hanging from your neck for several hours, then you are fit. Enjoy your SLC 8x56, it's a beautiful instrument for both stargazing and birding (for hunting too, but that's for another forum).
Peter
 

[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
I posted some initial impressions here https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=392820 but have since read comments questioning its suitability for birding.

Admittedly, that was also my initial impression but I would revise that opinion now. It dwarfs a 42 mm binocular, but at 1225 g it is only about 50% heavier than an average example and is not a serious burden when carried for an hour or two. To put things into perspective, I am probably one of the oldest members on the forum (past my sell-by date as Binastro put it) and am no longer fit, so I think anyone who considers it too heavy is either exaggerating or has a serious skeletal problem.

I replaced Swarovski's strap contraption with a simple one from Niggeloh (allegedly the original supplier to Leica, Swarovski and Zeiss), which was radically shortened so that it just passes over my head. Who needs harnesses?

At New Moon I took it down to the Star Park in the Eifel (about 70 km SW of Cologne), where there is relatively little light pollution and had some magnificent views of the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. Should I ever be asked the silly question how far I can see with it, the answer would be, "Only about two and a half millon light years." ;)

John
I had the SLC 8x56 and it is excellent optically although the 400 foot FOV is getting puny compared to the new NL. The three big advantages it has are how glare resistant it is compared to smaller aperture binoculars, how aberration free the on-axis view is and how bright it is in low light but most of the time a birder never needs a 7 mm exit pupil unless you do a lot of owling. I must have serious skeletal problems because I could not tolerate carrying 44oz. for any length of time, especially when hiking but if used in a static position or from an overlook it is great. If you can handle the weight it will give you a great view. Just ask Henry. He sure likes his Zeiss 8x56 FL because of the aberration free view it gives him.
 
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etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
Even a heavy glass becomes pretty tolerable if carried over the shoulder bandoleer style.
A good wide strap is essential though, to spread the weight.
Neoprene straps provide some stretch, which further cushions the impact.
 

forent

Well-known member
(...) I replaced Swarovski's strap contraption with a simple one from Niggeloh (allegedly the original supplier to Leica, Swarovski and Zeiss), which was radically shortened so that it just passes over my head. Who needs harnesses? (...)
That's EXACTLY the same that I did with my Swarovski 10x56 SLC. ;)
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
In relation to carrying a heavy binocular (or camera) bandolier style, I recently came across this interesting variation
It's designed by the professional photographer Nicole Elliott, and available from BlackRapid

See both the BR website at: https://blackrapid.co.uk/product/nicole-elliott-by-blackrapid/
And some more detail at: https://www.thephoblographer.com/20...-the-female-photographer-in-mind/#more-164657

The distinctive feature is the shoulder pad construction that moves the weight from the neck area, to directly over the shoulder
So there's both a much broader area of contact, and skeletal rather than soft tissue contact
The jaunty over the hip ‘gunfighter’ positioning of the binocular or camera is presumedly optional!

So perhaps a useful option especially for those with neck problems

And considering the price it may be possible to fabricate a much cheaper DIY version


John
 

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[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
In relation to carrying a heavy binocular (or camera) bandolier style, I recently came across this interesting variation
It's designed by the professional photographer Nicole Elliott, and available from BlackRapid

See both the BR website at: https://blackrapid.co.uk/product/nicole-elliott-by-blackrapid/
And some more detail at: https://www.thephoblographer.com/20...-the-female-photographer-in-mind/#more-164657

The distinctive feature is the shoulder pad construction that moves the weight from the neck area, to directly over the shoulder
So there's both a much broader area of contact, and skeletal rather than soft tissue contact
The jaunty over the hip ‘gunfighter’ positioning of the binocular or camera is presumedly optional!

So perhaps a useful option especially for those with neck problems

And considering the price it may be possible to fabricate a much cheaper DIY version


John
A lot of those shoulder straps like the Nicole Elliott will ride up your shoulder to your neck. This one uses and underarm strap to avoid that problem plus it is only $9.99 at Amazon.com. The Ocim Camera Strap, Camera Sling Strap with Safety Tether, Adjustable and Comfortable Neck/Shoulder Belt. It is 4 1/2 star rated which is pretty good.

https://www.amazon.com/Camera-Relea...=binocular+sling+strap&qid=1601862090&sr=8-34
 

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John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Hi Dennis,

I take your point about conventional straps sliding off the shoulder and onto the neck area
However, the size and shape of the shoulder pad is supposed to prevent that

The idea came from the practice in some cultures, where women carry babies in shawls wrapped around their shoulders
The shoulder piece is supposed to mimic the function of a shawl, and so similarly stay in place


John
 

tenex

reality-based
Antarctica
I replaced Swarovski's strap contraption with a simple one from Niggeloh (allegedly the original supplier to Leica, Swarovski and Zeiss), which was radically shortened so that it just passes over my head.
I've also carried my SLC 56s on long walks without trouble. I use the Leica strap from my UV32, which weighs so little I carry it instead on a simple nylon strap (Nikon AN-4B). The neoprene strap I see on the Niggeloh website looks equally well made but the pad is completely straight-edged, while I find the contouring of the Leica version helpful (it sits lower and tugs the neck less). The Swaro strap also had that of course but I hated the plastic levers and floppy ends.
 

Tringa45

Well-known member
Europe
I've also carried my SLC 56s on long walks without trouble. I use the Leica strap from my UV32, which weighs so little I carry it instead on a simple nylon strap (Nikon AN-4B). The neoprene strap I see on the Niggeloh website looks equally well made but the pad is completely straight-edged, while I find the contouring of the Leica version helpful (it sits lower and tugs the neck less). The Swaro strap also had that of course but I hated the plastic levers and floppy ends.

The Niggeloh strap I bought is contoured but otherwise conventional. They also produce luxury versions in leather and loden, but it appears these have some sort of superfluous quick-release system.

John
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
Hello John,

I've been using the SLC 8x56 for 1 1/2 years, the optical performance fascinated me at first glance, I got the "wow" feeling, my second thought was "must have"!
I also use the glass for birding, hang it over my shoulder then I can carry it for a few kilometers even though I'm not a Chuck Norris either.
It is now one of my absolute favorite optics that the picture has something magical ...o:)

Andreas
 

Gray C

Newbie birder
I would imagine a Rick Young harness would distribute the weight evenly to make it manageable for birding use?
 

Gray C

Newbie birder
Is there a "noticeable" difference in low light between the 8x42s and the 8x56s, or is it only slight?
 

CharleyBird

Well-known member
The SLC 8x56 WB are available for under £1300 in the UK at the moment.
Tempting price, however can't see myself using them much when I have a couple pairs of 7x42.
 

forent

Well-known member
(...) The neoprene strap I see on the Niggeloh website looks equally well made but the pad is completely straight-edged, while I find the contouring of the Leica version helpful (it sits lower and tugs the neck less). (...)
The Niggeloh strap I bought is contoured but otherwise conventional. They also produce luxury versions in leather and loden, but it appears these have some sort of superfluous quick-release system. (...)
The Niggeloh neoprene strap "Outline" is ergonomically curved and available in green and black:
https://www.jagdgewehr.de/media/image/b2/02/d3/W24-406600321.jpg
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61bQ5m7zgOL._AC_SX679_.jpg
See their German webside (scroll down):
https://www.niggeloh.de/de/fernglasgurte.html
I use them on the SLC 10x56 (black) and the Trinovid 8x42 BA (green). Great!
 

Conndomat

United States of Europe
Europe
Is there a "noticeable" difference in low light between the 8x42s and the 8x56s, or is it only slight?

Hello,

It is important that your pupil is still well over 6mm. then the differences are quite clear!

I compared the SLC 8x56 with a Zeiss SF 8x42, Swarovski 8,5x42, Nikon EDG 7x42, Fujinon FMT 10x50 and a Zeiss Victory 10x56 T*FL that the SLC is noticeably brighter than all of these other glasses.

Andreas
 

tenex

reality-based
Antarctica
The Niggeloh neoprene strap "Outline" is ergonomically curved and available in green and black...
Thank you, that webpage is confusing: the photo clearly shows a strap that is not contoured, but I see now what I missed before, mention of a second version that's surely identical to the Leica-branded version I use on my SLC 56s. ("Version „Outline“ Kontur mit verbesserter Anpassung an die Körperform durch die konturförmige Gestaltung") It's so simple, comfortable, and effective that I see no point in making straight ones. Curiously Niggeloh seems to have no US dealers.
.
 
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