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Accipitridae (1 Viewer)

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
ONG, P. S., LUCZON, A. U., QUILANG, J. P., SUMAYA, A. M. T., IBAÑEZ, J. C., SALVADOR, D. J. and FONTANILLA, I. K. C. , DNA barcodes of Philippine accipitrids. Molecular Ecology Resources, no. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-0998.2010.02928.x
Abstract
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Philippine birds incl. Accipitrids

ONG, P. S., LUCZON, A. U., QUILANG, J. P., SUMAYA, A. M. T., IBAÑEZ, J. C., SALVADOR, D. J. and FONTANILLA, I. K. C. , DNA barcodes of Philippine accipitrids. Molecular Ecology Resources, no. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-0998.2010.02928.x
Abstract

ADRIAN U. LUCZON, ABDEL HADI M. MOHAMMAD ISA, ANDREW F. TORRES, ANNA MAE T. SUMAYA, JAYSON C. IBAÑEZ, DENNIS J. SALVADOR, PERRY S. ONG, JONAS P. QUILANG, and IAN KENDRICH C. FONTANILLA. DNA BARCODING OF PHILIPPINE BIRDS.
Poster PDF
 

Daniel Philippe

Well-known member
Comparative osteology

Comparative osteology of the family Accipitridae (Aves: Accipitriformes) with a reassessment of its phylogenetic relationships

R. Migotto & E. Höfling

The family Accipitridae figures as one of the largest lineages of non-passerine modern birds comprising 67 genera and 256 species globally distributed. Phylogenetic relationships among accipitrid genera have been historically debated, with many efforts aimed at the recognition of subgroups. Although there have been several studies on the comparative anatomy of the group, morphological studies based on cladistic methods are restricted to a single investigation which provided limited insights into the phylogeny of the group. In contrast, over the last decade, several hypotheses based on molecular data have been put forward and demonstrated that many of the traditional assemblages do not correspond to monophyletic groups. As a consequence novel intrafamilial arrangements were proposed for the family. Stemming from an investigation of the evolution of morphological attributes in accipitrids, a new phylogenetic hypothesis is presented based on the examination of the cranial and post-cranial skeleton from a comprehensive taxonomic representation of the group. Some 433 specimens from Brazilian and North American collections were consulted, which represented 113 species and 59 accipitrid genera. From the literature and comparative study of the material, 161 osteological characters were coded, of which 116 were binary and 45 nonordered multistate. The data matrix was submitted to parsimony analysis on the software TNT and resulted in 36 equally most parsimonious trees. The strict consensus topology showed large congruence with recent phylogenetic hypotheses for Accipitridae based on molecular data, with 11 of the 14 subfamilies proposed by those studies recovered in the present study, most with significant support. Based on the topology obtained and previous phylogenies of the group, a taxonomic rearrangement for the family Accipitridae is proposed comprising 10 subfamilies. Furthermore, the data presented here provides a potential framework for the phylogenetic positioning of the fossil taxa and future calibration of divergence time estimates within the family lineages.

26th International Ornithological Congress 2014, Tokyo
 

Richard Klim

-------------------------
Migotto & Höfling

Comparative osteology of the family Accipitridae (Aves: Accipitriformes) with a reassessment of its phylogenetic relationships
R. Migotto & E. Höfling
... Based on the topology obtained and previous phylogenies of the group, a taxonomic rearrangement for the family Accipitridae is proposed comprising 10 subfamilies. ...
26th International Ornithological Congress 2014, Tokyo
Presumably reflects Migotto 2013 (thesis)...
Rafael Migotto, 2013. Filogenia de Accipitridae (Aves: Accipitriformes) com base em caracteres osteológicos. Tese de Doutorado. Abstract
Based on the topology obtained, and known phylogenies of the group, a taxonomic rearrangement for the family Accipitridae was proposed comprising 10 subfamilies, two of which each include three tribes: Gypaetinae (Gypaetini, Polyboroidini and Pernini), Macheiramphinae, Aegypiinae, Circaetinae, Elaninae, Harpiinae, Aquilinae, Haliaeetinae, Milvinae and Buteoninae (Buteonini, Circini and Accipitrini). Additional recommendations were made for updating the nomenclature of some genera and species in the Accipitridae.
 
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Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Jenő Nagy & Jácint Tökölyi: Phylogeny, historical biogeography and the evolution of migration in accipitrid birds of prey (Aves: Accipitriformes). Ornis Hungarica. vol.22(1). (2014) p.15-35.

Abstract and PDF here
 

l_raty

laurent raty
The Tiny Hawk (and presumably Semicollared Hawk) do not seem closely related to Accipiter (Olson, 2006) and have been placed in the genus Hieraspiza (Kaup 1844, type superciliosa). It has not been clear what they are related to (Kocum, 2006), but the analysis by Nagy and Tökölyi (2014) put them in a group with the chanting goshawks, lizard buzzard (see also Griffiths et al., 2007; Lerner et al., 2008), and a couple of other species.
I'd be cautious with this part of the tree.

Nagy & Tökölyi did not give an explicit list of the sequences they used. (Unfortunately, this becomes more and more frequent: such lists, which usually appeared in the papers themselves, are now either relegated to online supplementary files [which, depending on the publisher, may or may not be straightforward to access], or omitted altogether. The result being that some papers end up not including anything pointing to the studies that produced the data they are based on. Somewhat disturbing, IMO, but...) Anyway, what Nagy & Tökölyi did give, however, is a list of the genes they used (Table 1). They apparently took all their sequences from GenBank. In GenBank, I see:
  • for Accipiter superciliosus: sequences of cox1 and 12s. (As well as sequences of myc and chd1z, but these were not used by Nagy & Tökölyi.)
  • for Kaupifalco, Micronisus and Melierax: one "mini-barcode" of Micronisus gabar (very short partial sequence of cox1, 100bp-long); no 12s; sequences of cytb, nd2, nd6, bfib7 and rag1. (As well as sequences of myc, and another "mini-barcode", this one of Melierax metabates, but myc was not used by Nagy & Tökölyi and Melierax metabates was not included in their analyzes.)
This means that in the data set, only the 100bp of the cox1 "mini-barcodes" can have been common to A. superciliosus, and only one single member of the rest of the clade: the grouping is on this (extremely thin) base only. Within the clade, the sister-group relationship between A. superciliosus and the two Melierax sensu stricto, on the other hand, appears to be based on nothing at all (the two "sister groups" share exactly zero bp of homologous sequences), and I would regard it as presumably wrong (such a relationship is very strongly contradicted by Annett Kocum's data [2006]).
 
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Richard Klim

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Phylogenetic data

Nagy & Tökölyi did not give an explicit list of the sequences they used. (Unfortunately, this becomes more and more frequent: such lists, which usually appeared in the papers themselves, are now either relegated to online supplementary files [which, depending on the publisher, may or may not be straightforward to access], or omitted altogether. The result being that some papers end up not including anything pointing to the studies that produced the data they are based on. Somewhat disturbing, IMO, but...)
Magee, May & Moore 2014. The dawn of open access to phylogenetic data. PLoS ONE 9(10): e110268. [article] [pdf]
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Xuhao Song, Jie Huang, Chaochao Yan, Gaowei Xu, Xiuyue Zhang, Bisong Yue. The complete mitochondrial genome of Accipiter virgatus and evolutionary history of the pseudo-control regions in Falconiformes. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, Volume 58, February 2015, Pages 75-84

[Abstract]
 

Richard Klim

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Jiang et al 2015

Jiang, Chen, Wang, Ren, Yuan, Qian, Hua, Guo, Zhang, Yang, Wang, Zhang, Ding, Bi, Zhang, Wang, Chen & Kan 2015. The mitochondrial genomes of Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus (Aves, Accipitriformes): sequence, structure and phylogenetic analyses. PLoS ONE 10(8): e0136297. [article] [pdf]
 

Richard Klim

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Jiang et al 2015 correction

Jiang, Chen, Wang, Ren, Yuan, Qian, Hua, Guo, Zhang, Yang, Wang, Zhang, Ding, Bi, Zhang, Wang, Chen & Kan 2015. The mitochondrial genomes of Aquila fasciata and Buteo lagopus (Aves, Accipitriformes): sequence, structure and phylogenetic analyses. PLoS ONE 10(8): e0136297. [article] [pdf]
Jiang et al 2015. Correction. PLoS ONE 10(10): e0141037. [article] [pdf]
 
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Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
Palearctic Buzzards

Michael J. Jowers, Santiago Sánchez-Ramírez, Susana Lopes, Igor Karyakin, ValeryDombrovski, Abdeljebbar Qninba, Thijs Valkenburg, Nuno Onofre, Nuno Ferrand, Pedro Beja, Luís Palma & Raquel Godinho. Unravelling population processes over the Late Pleistocene driving contemporary genetic divergence in Palearctic Buzzards. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 11 February 2019.

Abstract:

Population range expansions and contractions as a response to climate and habitat change throughout the Quaternary are known to have contributed to complex phylogenetic and population genetic events. Speciation patterns and processes in Palearctic buzzards (genus Buteo) are a long-standing example of morphological and genetic data incongruence, attributed to panmixia, habitat range shifts, contact zones, and climate change. Here we assess the systematics, phylogeography and population genetic structure of three nominal species of Palearctic buzzards, Buteo buteo (including B. b. vulpinus), B. rufinus (including B. r. cirtensis) and B. hemilasius. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from mitochondrial data recover B. hemilasius as sister to the sister clades B. r. rufinus and B. buteo complex (B. b. buteo, B. b. vulpinus, but also including B. r. cirtensis). In contrast, we find an unresolved genetic delimitation inferred from four nuclear loci, suggesting an ancestral genetic pool for all species. Time-trees suggest population contractions and expansions throughout the Pleistocene, which likely reflect habitat change and contrasting ecological niche requirements between species. Microsatellite-based extended Bayesian skyline plots reveal relatively constant population sizes for B. hemilasius, B. r. rufinus, and B. b. vulpinus, in contrast to a dramatic population expansion in B. r. cirtensis within the last 3 kya. Overall, our study illustrates how complex population processes over the Late Pleistocene have shaped the patterns of genetic divergence in Palearctic buzzards, due to the joint effects of shared ancestral polymorphisms, population expansions and contractions, with hybridization at contact zones leading to admixture and introgression.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Florian Kunz Anita Gamauf Frank E. Zachos Elisabeth Haring. 2019. Mitochondrial phylogenetics of the goshawk Accipiter [gentilis] superspecies. First published: 01 April, 2019.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jzs.12285

Abstract
The Northern Goshawk Accipiter gentilis is a medium‐sized bird of prey inhabiting boreal and temperate forests. It has a Holarctic distribution with 10 recognized subspecies. Traditionally, it has been placed within the Accipiter [gentilis] superspecies, together with Henst's Goshawk A. henstii, the Black Sparrowhawk A. melanoleucus, and Meyer's Goshawk A. meyerianus. While those four taxa are geographically separated from each other, hence referred to as allospecies, their phylogenetic relationships are still unresolved. In the present study, we performed phylogenetic analyses on the Accipiter [gentilis] superspecies, including all recognized subspecies of all four allospecies, using partial sequences of two marker loci of the mitochondrial genome, the control region and the cytochrome b gene. We found a deep split within A. gentilis into two monophyletic groups, a Nearctic clade (three subspecies) and a Palearctic clade (seven subspecies). The Palearctic clade is closely related to A. meyerianus, and together these two were more closely related to the other Old World taxa A. henstii and A. melanoleucus, which in turn were reciprocally monophyletic sister species. As a consequence, A. gentilis as usually conceived (including all Holarctic subspecies) was non‐monophyletic. We found a strong genetic homogeneity within Palearctic A. gentilis despite the fact that it comprises seven subspecies distributed from the Atlantic coast in Western Europe to Eastern Siberia. Relationships between the four clades could not be resolved unambiguously. Our results, if confirmed by more integrative data, would imply a taxonomic revision of Nearctic A. gentilis into a separate allospecies, Accipiter [gentilis] atricapillus.


Now that Astur (Astur) atricapillus has been raised to species rank, how are the subspecies distributed between A. gentilis and A. atricapillus ?
 

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