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Accipitridae (1 Viewer)

l_raty

laurent raty
And....do you have any information to add concerning Nauclerus ?
I agree with Mark's findings.

Name : Nauclerus
Authority : Vigors
Year : 1825
OD ref : Vigors NA. 1825. On a new genus of Falconidae. In: Sketches in ornithology; or, observations on the leading affinities of some of the more extensive groups of birds. Zool. J., 2: 385-387.
Page : 386
OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/27490730
Included nominal species : Nauclerus riocourii, N. furcatus
Type species : Falco riocourii Temminck 1821
Type species valid syn. : in use
Fixation by : subsequent designation
Fixation ref : Stephens JF. 1826. Aves. In: Shaw G. General zoology or systematic natural history. Vol. XIV. Part I. J and A Arch, et al., London.
Page : 346
Fixation link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/46394186
Type OD ref : Temminck CJ, Laugier de Chartrouse GMJM de. 1838. Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux : pour servir de suite et de complément aux planches enluminées de Buffon. FG Levrault, Paris.
Page : wrapper to livr. 15 & pl. 85
Type OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/54038406 , https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35245599
Notes : Invalid designation: Gray GR. 1840. A list of the genera of birds, with an indication of the typical species of each genus. R and JE Taylor, London.; p. 4; https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/13668942 ; Falco furcatus Linnaeus 1766. Not the first designation. Type species: named 'Falco riocour' in Temminck’s text; 'riocourii' is the spelling on the original plate wrapper.
Available : yes
Family : Accipitridae

Name : Chelictinia
Authority : Lesson
Year : 1843
OD ref : Lesson RP. 1843. Index ornithologique. (suite.) Écho Monde Sav., 10 (1): 60-63.
Page : 63
OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/47080135
Included nominal species : Chelictinia riocourii
Type species : Falco riocourii Temminck 1821
Type species valid syn. : in use
Fixation by : monotypy
Fixation ref : as OD
Page : as OD
Fixation link : as OD
Type OD ref : Temminck CJ, Laugier de Chartrouse GMJM de. 1838. Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux : pour servir de suite et de complément aux planches enluminées de Buffon. FG Levrault, Paris.
Page : wrapper to livr. 15 & pl. 85
Type OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/54038406 , https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35245599
Notes :
Available : yes
Family : Accipitridae

Name : Chelidopteryx
Authority : Kaup
Year : 1844
OD ref : Kaup JJ. 1844. Classification der Säugethiere und Vögel. CW Leske, Darmstadt.
Page : 112
OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35282194
Included nominal species : Nauclerus rioucourii
Type species : Falco riocourii Temminck 1821
Type species valid syn. : in use
Fixation by : monotypy
Fixation ref : as OD
Page : as OD
Fixation link : as OD
Type OD ref : Temminck CJ, Laugier de Chartrouse GMJM de. 1838. Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux : pour servir de suite et de complément aux planches enluminées de Buffon. FG Levrault, Paris.
Page : wrapper to livr. 15 & pl. 85
Type OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/54038406 , https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35245599
Notes : As a subgenus of Nauclerus. Also: 1847, Isis (Oken), 1847, 87.
Available : yes
Family : Accipitridae

Name : Cypselopteryx
Authority : Kaup
Year : 1850
OD ref : Kaup JJ. 1850. Corrigirte Uebersicht der Falconidae. Arch. Naturgesch., 16 (1): 27-41.
Page : 31
OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/14713041
Included nominal species : Nauclerus riocouri
Type species : Falco riocourii Temminck 1821
Type species valid syn. : in use
Fixation by : replacement name
Fixation ref : see original name
Page : see original name
Fixation link : see original name
Type OD ref : Temminck CJ, Laugier de Chartrouse GMJM de. 1838. Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux : pour servir de suite et de complément aux planches enluminées de Buffon. FG Levrault, Paris.
Page : wrapper to livr. 15 & pl. 85
Type OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/54038406 , https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35245599
Notes : New name for Chelidopteryx Kaup 1844. “Cypselopteryx, Kaup. (olim Chelidopteryx.)” Senior homonym of Cypselopteryx Townsend 1926 (Diptera).
Available : yes
Family : Accipitridae

Name : Elanopterus
Authority : Antinori
Year : 1864
OD ref : Antinori O. 1864. Catalogo descrittivi di una collezione di uccelli, fatta nell'interno dell'Africa centrale nord dal maggio 1859 al luglio 1861. G Daelli Comp., Milano.
Page : xi
OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/33193564
Included nominal species : Elanopterus riocourii
Type species : Falco riocourii Temminck 1821
Type species valid syn. : in use
Fixation by : monotypy
Fixation ref : as OD
Page : as OD
Fixation link : as OD
Type OD ref : Temminck CJ, Laugier de Chartrouse GMJM de. 1838. Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d'oiseaux : pour servir de suite et de complément aux planches enluminées de Buffon. FG Levrault, Paris.
Page : wrapper to livr. 15 & pl. 85
Type OD link : https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/54038406 , https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/35245599
Notes : Generally considered a lapsus.
Available : yes
Family : Accipitridae
...these are all objective synonyms.
 
Last edited:

albertonykus

Well-known member
Adawaren​, E.O, M. Du Plessis, E. Suleman, D. Kindler, A.O. Oosthuizen, L. Mukandiwa, and V. Naidoo (2020)
The complete mitochondrial genome of Gyps coprotheres (Aves, Accipitridae, Accipitriformes): phylogenetic analysis of mitogenome among raptors
PeerJ 8: e10034
doi: 10.7717/peerj.10034
https://peerj.com/articles/10034/

Three species of Old World vultures on the Asian peninsula are slowly recovering from the lethal consequences of diclofenac. At present the reason for species sensitivity to diclofenac is unknown. Furthermore, it has since been demonstrated that other Old World vultures like the Cape (Gyps coprotheres; CGV) and griffon (G. fulvus) vultures are also susceptible to diclofenac toxicity. Oddly, the New World Turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and pied crow (Corvus albus) are not susceptible to diclofenac toxicity. As a result of the latter, we postulate an evolutionary link to toxicity. As a first step in understanding the susceptibility to diclofenac toxicity, we use the CGV as a model species for phylogenetic evaluations, by comparing the relatedness of various raptor species known to be susceptible, non-susceptible and suspected by their relationship to the Cape vulture mitogenome. This was achieved by next generation sequencing and assembly. The Cape vulture mitogenome had a genome size of 16,908 bp. The mitogenome phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between Old World vultures and other members of the Accipitridae as indicated by bootstrap value of 100% on the phylogenetic trees. Based on this, we postulate that the other species could also be sensitive to the toxic effects of diclofenac. This warrants further investigations.
 

albertonykus

Well-known member
Catanach, T.A., M.R. Halley, J.M. Allen, J.A. Johnson, R. Thorstrom, S. Palhano, C.P. Thunder, J.C. Gallardo, and J.D. Weckstein (2021)
Systematics and conservation of an endemic radiation of Accipiter hawks in the Caribbean islands
Ornithology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1093/ornithology/ukab041

More than one-third of the bird species found in the Caribbean are endemic to a set of neighboring islands or a single island. However, we have little knowledge of the evolutionary history of the Caribbean avifauna, and the lack of phylogenetic studies limits our understanding of the extent of endemism in the region. The Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) occurs widely across the Americas and includes 3 endemic Caribbean taxa: venator on Puerto Rico, striatus on Hispaniola, and fringilloides on Cuba. These island populations have undergone extreme declines presumably due to ecosystem changes caused by anthropogenic factors, as well as due to severe hurricanes. Sharp-shinned Hawks, in general, and Caribbean Sharp-shinned Hawks, in particular, have not been placed in a modern phylogenetic context. However, the island taxa have historically been presumed to have some ongoing gene flow with mainland populations. Here we sequenced ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and their flanking regions from 38 samples, focusing on Caribbean taxa. Using a combination of UCEs, mitochondrial genome sequences, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships among Caribbean lineages and their relationships to mainland taxa. We found that Caribbean Sharp-shinned Hawks are reciprocally monophyletic in all datasets with regard to mainland populations and among island taxa (with no shared mtDNA haplotypes) and that divergence in the NADH dehydrogenase 2 gene (ND2) between these mainland and island groups averaged 1.83%. Furthermore, sparse non-negative matrix factorization (sNMF) analysis indicated that Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and mainland samples each form separate populations with limited admixture. We argue that our findings are consistent with the recognition of the 3 resident Caribbean populations as species-level taxa because nuclear and mitochondrial genetic data indicate reciprocal monophyly and have species-level divergences, there is no sharing of mitochondrial haplotypes among or between island taxa and those on the mainland; and they are diagnosable by plumage.
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Catanach, T.A., M.R. Halley, J.M. Allen, J.A. Johnson, R. Thorstrom, S. Palhano, C.P. Thunder, J.C. Gallardo, and J.D. Weckstein (2021)
Systematics and conservation of an endemic radiation of Accipiter hawks in the Caribbean islands
Ornithology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1093/ornithology/ukab041

More than one-third of the bird species found in the Caribbean are endemic to a set of neighboring islands or a single island. However, we have little knowledge of the evolutionary history of the Caribbean avifauna, and the lack of phylogenetic studies limits our understanding of the extent of endemism in the region. The Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) occurs widely across the Americas and includes 3 endemic Caribbean taxa: venator on Puerto Rico, striatus on Hispaniola, and fringilloides on Cuba. These island populations have undergone extreme declines presumably due to ecosystem changes caused by anthropogenic factors, as well as due to severe hurricanes. Sharp-shinned Hawks, in general, and Caribbean Sharp-shinned Hawks, in particular, have not been placed in a modern phylogenetic context. However, the island taxa have historically been presumed to have some ongoing gene flow with mainland populations. Here we sequenced ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and their flanking regions from 38 samples, focusing on Caribbean taxa. Using a combination of UCEs, mitochondrial genome sequences, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships among Caribbean lineages and their relationships to mainland taxa. We found that Caribbean Sharp-shinned Hawks are reciprocally monophyletic in all datasets with regard to mainland populations and among island taxa (with no shared mtDNA haplotypes) and that divergence in the NADH dehydrogenase 2 gene (ND2) between these mainland and island groups averaged 1.83%. Furthermore, sparse non-negative matrix factorization (sNMF) analysis indicated that Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and mainland samples each form separate populations with limited admixture. We argue that our findings are consistent with the recognition of the 3 resident Caribbean populations as species-level taxa because nuclear and mitochondrial genetic data indicate reciprocal monophyly and have species-level divergences, there is no sharing of mitochondrial haplotypes among or between island taxa and those on the mainland; and they are diagnosable by plumage.
I take it 🖐️☝️
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Catanach, T.A., M.R. Halley, J.M. Allen, J.A. Johnson, R. Thorstrom, S. Palhano, C.P. Thunder, J.C. Gallardo, and J.D. Weckstein (2021)
Systematics and conservation of an endemic radiation of Accipiter hawks in the Caribbean islands
Ornithology (advance online publication)
doi: 10.1093/ornithology/ukab041

More than one-third of the bird species found in the Caribbean are endemic to a set of neighboring islands or a single island. However, we have little knowledge of the evolutionary history of the Caribbean avifauna, and the lack of phylogenetic studies limits our understanding of the extent of endemism in the region. The Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) occurs widely across the Americas and includes 3 endemic Caribbean taxa: venator on Puerto Rico, striatus on Hispaniola, and fringilloides on Cuba. These island populations have undergone extreme declines presumably due to ecosystem changes caused by anthropogenic factors, as well as due to severe hurricanes. Sharp-shinned Hawks, in general, and Caribbean Sharp-shinned Hawks, in particular, have not been placed in a modern phylogenetic context. However, the island taxa have historically been presumed to have some ongoing gene flow with mainland populations. Here we sequenced ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and their flanking regions from 38 samples, focusing on Caribbean taxa. Using a combination of UCEs, mitochondrial genome sequences, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we investigated the phylogenetic relationships among Caribbean lineages and their relationships to mainland taxa. We found that Caribbean Sharp-shinned Hawks are reciprocally monophyletic in all datasets with regard to mainland populations and among island taxa (with no shared mtDNA haplotypes) and that divergence in the NADH dehydrogenase 2 gene (ND2) between these mainland and island groups averaged 1.83%. Furthermore, sparse non-negative matrix factorization (sNMF) analysis indicated that Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and mainland samples each form separate populations with limited admixture. We argue that our findings are consistent with the recognition of the 3 resident Caribbean populations as species-level taxa because nuclear and mitochondrial genetic data indicate reciprocal monophyly and have species-level divergences, there is no sharing of mitochondrial haplotypes among or between island taxa and those on the mainland; and they are diagnosable by plumage.
If anyone can send me this paper too please
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
An unexpected surprise !!

 

TomDerutter

Well-known member
quote from TiF:
There are two oldest available names for the Tachyspiza clade: Tachyspiza (type soloensis) and Leucospiza (type novaehollandiae), both from the same 1844 monograph by Kaup. Neither seems to have obtained any priority over the other, and I'm somewhat arbitrarily using Tachyspiza here. However, someone will need to formally pick one in the literature and give it priority, hopefully Tachyspiza. The name Leucospiza really only fits the white morph of novaehollandiae.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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