• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Accipter and Corvid NE.London (1 Viewer)

KenM

Well-known member
Yesterday NE.London, one for Rother......he's the man to sort it out!
 

Attachments

  • P1880699.jpeg    Accip and Corvid 1..jpg
    P1880699.jpeg Accip and Corvid 1..jpg
    48.2 KB · Views: 154
  • P1880700.jpeg   Accip and Corvid 2..jpg
    P1880700.jpeg Accip and Corvid 2..jpg
    51.3 KB · Views: 136
  • P1880701.jpeg   Accip and Corvid 3..jpg
    P1880701.jpeg Accip and Corvid 3..jpg
    57.8 KB · Views: 85

CARERY

Well-known member
Last year I've got a similar shot of a Sparrowhawk and a Crow. Hooded in my pic and Carrion in your's Ken.
 

Attachments

  • BIF0001_RNE_20180330_ESparrowhawk-AD-F+HCrow_Kuehlungsborn.jpg
    BIF0001_RNE_20180330_ESparrowhawk-AD-F+HCrow_Kuehlungsborn.jpg
    206.3 KB · Views: 82

KenM

Well-known member
Quite right lads!...the interesting aspect is that on length there’s not much in it...compared to the official size differential of 46cm and 37cm respectively for Corvid and female Sprawk, thus it appears that female Sprawks might well be enjoying a greater size differential than currently appreciated?

Cheers
 

Rotherbirder

Well-known member
I won't rise to the bait Ken, don't worry! Nothing to 'sort out', its an obvious Sparrowhawk!! Unless its a Shagorant flying backwards that is?!

RB
 

igorfest

Well-known member
In my opinion it's a Goshwak! Clearly bigger than the Sparrowhawk in the "example" photograph and the accompanying carrion Crown, with longer and more bulging head, thicker tail, wider "hand" (note the thinner forewing of female Sparrowhawk) and bicoloured head (for the greater contrast between dark cheeks and pale throat, easy to see if you lighten the photo...).

Ciao, Igor
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
In my opinion it's a Goshwak! Clearly bigger than the Sparrowhawk in the "example" photograph and the accompanying carrion Crown, with longer and more bulging head, thicker tail, wider "hand" (note the thinner forewing of female Sparrowhawk) and bicoloured head (for the greater contrast between dark cheeks and pale throat, easy to see if you lighten the photo...).

Ciao, Igor

Not a chance........
 

Mike Earp

Well-known member
Ken

Did you get a photo of the female Goshawk you're reporting on the London Bird Club Wiki LatestNews page as having seen today over Woodford Green?

Mike
 

KenM

Well-known member
Ken

Did you get a photo of the female Goshawk you're reporting on the London Bird Club Wiki LatestNews page as having seen today over Woodford Green?

Mike

Mike

I didn't I'm afraid, brevity of view, window frames and trees got in the way, however here are a few shots, first three taken a few years ago from the same window, and the second, a few weeks ago at a site from which I'm not at liberty to divulge.

You should find them most instructive, basically long winged and mostly round tailed, sometimes looking falcon like, with bulging secondaries, and often with (weather conditions allowing) a propensity to glide very long distances on static wings, especially when it's still and warm with cloud cover as it was today at 12.39 pm. If you need assistance in getting to grips with Accipter gentilis ID, you know where to come.

Ken
 

Attachments

  • Accip.3.April 14th.2013.jpg
    Accip.3.April 14th.2013.jpg
    76.3 KB · Views: 57
  • Accip.7 April 14th 2013.jpg
    Accip.7 April 14th 2013.jpg
    50.4 KB · Views: 71
  • Accip.8.April 14th 2013.jpg
    Accip.8.April 14th 2013.jpg
    47.9 KB · Views: 48
  • P1870246.jpeg   Sole Gos 1..jpeg
    P1870246.jpeg Sole Gos 1..jpeg
    229.4 KB · Views: 81

Mike Earp

Well-known member
If you need assistance in getting to grips with Accipter gentilis ID, you know where to come.

Thanks Ken, very droll. Not sure which made me laugh more, your implied offer of help with Goshawk identification or your misspelling of Accipiter. Or did you mean that BirdForum is the place to go?
 

SteveClifton

Well-known member
Quite right lads!...the interesting aspect is that on length there’s not much in it...compared to the official size differential of 46cm and 37cm respectively for Corvid and female Sprawk, thus it appears that female Sprawks might well be enjoying a greater size differential than currently appreciated?

Cheers

How certain are you (or anyone else) that this wasn't a Jackdaw, and hence, a male Sparrowhawk?
 

KenM

Well-known member
Thanks Ken, very droll. Not sure which made me laugh more, your implied offer of help with Goshawk identification or your misspelling of Accipiter. Or did you mean that BirdForum is the place to go?

I suspect I’ve had more exposure to Accipiters than yourself Mike, sixty years in the woods has helped!....thus the offer of help as you put it was “a little droll”. Regarding assistance on BF I’m sure you’ll get loads, also beware....misspelling abounds on occasion, hoping you can cope with that, happy birding to you.

Ken
 

KenM

Well-known member
How certain are you (or anyone else) that this wasn't a Jackdaw, and hence, a male Sparrowhawk?

Steve, initially it was (as is mostly the case) the call of the corvid, which drew my attention to the sprawk, however, a valid point when presented with this type of scenario.

That said, although there is the odd pair of Jackdaws that breed in the immediate vicinity, I’ve never seen a single Jackdaw engage a Sprawk, it appears to be a Carrion Crow feature.

Cheers
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top