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Acrocephalus etymology (1 Viewer)

l_raty

laurent raty
Acrocephalus in: Naumann JA, Naumann F. 1811. Naturgeschichte der Land- und Wasser-Vögel des nördlichen Deutschlands und angränzender Länder. Nachtrag. Viertes Heft. Köthen.
With deep thanks to Martin :)
 

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  • Nachtrag 4, p0198-0203, Acrocephalus.pdf
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Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Acrocephalus in: Naumann JA, Naumann F. 1811. Naturgeschichte der Land- und Wasser-Vögel des nördlichen Deutschlands und angränzender Länder. Nachtrag. Viertes Heft. Köthen.
With deep thanks to Martin :)
Excellent! :t: :t: :t:
 

l_raty

laurent raty
however the (Kupfertafeln) 'Tabula XXXXVI', in the latter work is unseen by me.
The SUB Göttinger Digitalisierungszentrum has the text and plates up to Nachtrag, zweites Hetf : https://gdz.sub.uni-goettingen.de/volumes/id/PPN614795702
(The plate volumes are those with a brown cover.)
Tabula XXXXVI (alt. XLVI) of the erster Band is: https://gdz.sub.uni-goettingen.de/id/PPN614796377?tify={"pages":[95],"view":"info"}

(For two species, A. stagnatilis, A. fluviatilis, a "Taf. 27" is cited in the OD, without a volume number, thus this was presumably a plate associated to the 4th part of the Nachtrag itself. This, I have not seen yet. From the description, I think stagnatilis is a River Warbler; fluviatilis is used here as a substitute for Latham's locustella, and should be a Grasshopper Warbler.)
 
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Melanie

Well-known member
Is anyone here who knows the full name and life data of Baron T. Nijo who worked for Yoshimaro Yamashina and collected the holotype of Acrocephalus nijoi?
 

l_raty

laurent raty
Is anyone here who knows the full name and life data of Baron T. Nijo who worked for Yoshimaro Yamashina and collected the holotype of Acrocephalus nijoi?
OD: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jjo1915/10/50/10_50_673/_pdf/-char/en: "Baron T. Nijô (男爵二條豊基)".

Google says: "男爵" = baron, "二條" = Nijo, "豊基" = Toyoki.

But Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nijō_Masamaro (as well as several other websites) has: "Nijō Toyomoto (二条 豊基, 1909–1944)" -- which I guess must be more correct.
 
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Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Is anyone here who knows the full name and life data of Baron T. Nijo who worked for Yoshimaro Yamashina and collected the holotype of Acrocephalus nijoi?
Sorry Melanie, I have no notes (in or for my MS) of the obscure "Baron T. Nijô (男爵二條豊基)", but if needed I can ask my dear Japanese friend and neighbour Nobuhiko Osawa if he might know, or could find out, who that guy was.

That is, of course, if James doesn't already know him, which I think he does ...

Well, see, when (and, of course, if) James will reply.

/B
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Thank you very much, Björn. Would be interesting to know what your Japanese friend is thinking. But I think also that Laurent's explanation might be also a hint.
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
I will try to keep it it mind, next time I see him.

That is, of course, if James haven't answered, and solved it all, prior to that ...

We'll see.

/B
 

Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Acrocephalus (luscinius) nijoi YAMASHINA 1940

Note that German Wiki page (updated today) seems to have been in a bit of a hurry (the names of the guys involved written in Eastern order of their names!)

Or is this standard practice in German?

Either way, I have no idea if Baron Nijō "(1909–1944)" is all correct, or not, neither do I know if he had any connection to Yamashina (that is, the Japanese politician, as of/in Laurent's latter link in post #27). From what I can tell, this far, he might/could have, or not.

In any case, Marquis Yoshimaro Yamashina (1900-1989) is fully correct, that's for sure, a k a 山階 芳麿 (alt. in the Eastern/Japanese order of names, surname first: Yamashina Yoshimaro), the very founder of the well-known Yamashina Institute for Ornithology.

To be continued ... (I hope)

/B
-
 
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l_raty

laurent raty
Or is this standard practice in German?
This seems to be usual in Wikipedia as a whole, see the English Wikipedia page I linked in post #17. (With explicit warning - "In this Japanese name, the family name is Nijō.")

Although it can't be seen from this English Wiki page, the equivalent Japanese page (https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/二条正麿 ) indicates that "Nijō Masamaro (二条 正麿, January 9, 1872 – February 18, 1929)", the father of "Nijō Toyomoto (二条 豊基, 1909–1944)" was also a 男爵.
This page also says Toyomoto was "戦死", killed in action.
 

Melanie

Well-known member
No this is not practice. I was prematured because I've thought that Nijō Toyomoto might be the person I'm looking for. I have changed it back to Baron Nijo without life data.
 
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Taphrospilus

Well-known member
The old key seems not to help on this as it only claims:

Baron T. Nijo (fl. 1940) Japanese collector, naturalist (Acrocephalus).

But I see no reason why not Nijō Toyomoto? He was alive in 1940 when the bird was described so what's counting against him. Was the father a baron? Or how did he get his title?
 

l_raty

laurent raty
The father was a baron (男爵) as I noted above (#32).

At https://keibatsugaku.com/nijyo/, we are told:
◆二条正麿
 1872年 誕生
 1902年 男爵
 1905年 貴族院議員
 1929年 死去
  父:二条斉敬
  母:
  妻:酒井鶴子(伯爵 酒井忠道の長女)
    長男:
    二男:二条豊基
    三男:二条弼基(公爵 二条厚基の養子)
    長女
    二女:二条康子【二条誓康】(公爵 二条基弘の養女)
  妾:
    庶子:二条博基【牧野博基】(★子爵 牧野健之助の養子)
    庶子:二条文子(慶光院利彰の妻)

◆二条豊基
 1909年 誕生
 1929年 男爵
 南洋興発
 1944年 死去
  父:二条正麿
  母:酒井鶴子(伯爵 酒井忠道の長女)
  妻:前田桜子(国際信託会長 前田青莎の三女)
    男:二条正基
    長女:二条すみれ
    二女:二条早苗
I would make this:
◆ Nijō Masamaro
  1872 born
  1902 Baron
  1905 Member of the House of Lords
  1929 died
   Father: Nijō Nariyuki
   Mother:
   Wife: Sakai Tsuruko (Count Sakai Tadamichi's eldest daughter)
    Eldest son:
    Second son: Nijō Toyomoto
    Third son: Nijō Tanemoto (Duke Nijō Atsumoto's adopted child)
    Eldest daughter
    Second daughter: Nijō Yasuko [Nijō Osamu] (Duke Nijō Motohiro's adopted daughter)
   Concubine:
    Natural child: Nijō Hiromoto [Makino Hiromoto] (★ Viscount Makino Kennosuke's adopted child)
    Natural child: Nijō Fumiko (Keikoin Toshiaki's wife)

◆ Nijō Toyomoto
  1909 born
  1929 Baron
  Nan'yō Kōhatsu
  1944 died
   Father: Nijō Masamaro
   Mother: Sakai Tsuruko (Count Sakai Tadamichi's eldest daughter)
   Wife: Maeda Sakurako (International Trust Chairman Maeda Seison's third daughter)
    Son: Nijō Masamoto
    Eldest daughter: Nijō Sumire
    Second daughter: Nijō Sanae
Thus Toyomoto became a baron in 1929 after his father's death.
Note also that, if he was involved in Nan'yo Kōhatsu (南洋興発), he was at the right location to provide Micronesian specimens to Yamashina.

Re. -ki vs. -moto, the kanji 基 can be both: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/基#Etymology_1
 
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Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Acrocephalus (luscinius) nijoi YAMASHINA 1940

One more ... though nothing contradictory (only some added info/confirmation)

The (Junior) Baron Toyomoto Nijō (1909–1944), alt. ditto Nijô, a k a 條豊基 , or in the Eastern/Japanese way: 'Nijō Toyomoto' do seem to be "our guy".

The single specimen [the Type (holotype) itself, of nijoi; "標本番号YIO-27843"]; "... that exists only in Yamashina Institute for Ornithology in the world", can be seen here, or on the attached JPG.

And note the following certain part (from that particular page, all in Japanese):
... 採集者の二條豊基(とよもと)男爵に因んで、山階博士が献名したことに由来があります ...
Google Translate:
... it is derived from the name given by Dr. Yamashina in honor of the collector, Baron Toyomoto. ...
Well, that just about said it all ...

Thus, I don't think I will have to bother my friend Nobuhiko Osawa with this certain one. ;)

Anyone who thinks otherwise?

However, enjoy!

Björn

PS. And, Melanie, sorry for the extra job.

PPS. Also note that "Mr. Hyojiro Orii, a collector hired by Dr. Yamashina" is mentioned as well in the same (Japanese) text, which ought to be the same "H. Orii" (折 居 彪 二 郎) mentioned in the OD (in post #27), which must be the fairly well-known Japanese collector Hyojiro Orii (1883-?1948) , commemorated in several taxa, after having collected in various places, both in Japan, and Korea, as well as in Manchuria and on several Islands in the Pacific.
--
 

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Björn Bergenholtz

... also known as "Calalp"
Final post on Baron Nijō, and the specimen/s of "his" Reed Warbler

I simply have to return to this certain species, just to get things right, as Japanese is a language hard to understand (to say the least) ;), and as I, in my former post (somewhat sloppy), cut the quote a bit too short (when inserting that Japanese text into Google Translate), the way I wrote the following part unfortunately turned out a bit bad, which made it easy to misinterpret (or simply dead wrong) ...
...
The single specimen [the Type (holotype) itself, of nijoi; "標本番号YIO-27843"]; "... that exists only in Yamashina Institute for Ornithology in the world", can be seen ...
From the OD itself (link in post #27) of "Conopoderas luscinia nijoi" [today's (even if extinct) Acrocephalus (luscinius) nijoi (Yamashina, 1940)] it's clear that "5 ads." (five adults) were collected ... and, all five specimens are still present in the collection of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology (YIO), Chiba, Japan [which, as far as I understand it, ought to make them all Syntypes]:

  1. Specimen ID: YIO-27842 (Old specimen ID: YY-27812); "Conopoderas luscinia nijoi" (on label), collected 29 Feb. 1940, (here)
  2. Specimen ID: YIO-00162 (Old specimen ID: YY-27813); "Conopoderas luscinia nijoi" (on label), collected 29 Feb. 1940, (here), marked: "Type specimen"
  3. Specimen ID: YIO-27843 (Old specimen ID: YY-27814); "Conopoderas luscinia nijoi" (on label), collected 29 Feb. 1940 (here)
  4. Specimen ID: YIO-27844 (Old specimen ID: YY-27815); "Conopoderas luscinia nijoi" (on label), collected 29 Feb. 1940 (here)
  5. Specimen ID: YIO-27845 (Old specimen ID: YY-27816); "Conopoderas luscinia nijoi" (on label), collected 29 Feb. 1940 (here)

Thus; five is five, five they were, and five they (still) are. Right should be right.

Well, that it. I'm done (on this one).

nijoi ... over and out!

Björn

PS. All of YIO's Acrocephalus luscinius specimens, of various ssp.: here.
--
 
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