• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Adventurer T WP 6.5x32mm – an older person's view (1 Viewer)

This was my fourth binocular which I supposed might accompany me and my bicycle on road and rough track without fear of insupportable loss through their being dropped or left forgotten on a river-bank.

My first impression was of a smart compact instrument designed to recall classic models of the 20th century. The objective lens covers were fine, the plastic caps for the eyepieces not quite so helpful, but I found a rubber rainguard in my spares-box and it fitted perfectly when attached to the halter. The eyeguards were of a simple rubber type which might readily be detached and washed. All this tackle together weighed about 630g and slipped into a nice black carry-case with a cleaning cloth inside.

I prefer not to wear spectacles but to use the diopter adjustment to compensate for the difference between my left and right eyes. This means that I need perhaps minus 3 diopters on the dial. This is out of range of some binoculars, so I was grateful for the +/- 4 that the Opticron offered. Adjusting for interpupillary distance proved a little stiff, but once set it did not slip. The central focussing wheel turned smoothly through a full circle between infinity and the 3-metre nearest focus.

Muscular tremor may become a problem as one grows older. The binocular sat comfortably in my hands, neither heavy nor insubstantial. The view was quite exciting – wide 9-degrees angle, sharp bright and colourful, equal to my Habicht 7x42 at centre of field, but showing less obvious colour fringes as my eyes turned behind the eyepieces. Spherical curvature was pronounced but it all straightened up when I looked along the optical axis as one will obviously do when spotting. Sunshine, twilight or night, it was a pleasure to use.

An instrument that cost me one tenth the price of my Habicht might be expected to fall short at some point. When I subjected it to cruelly close scrutiny I found defects such as an inconspicuous patch of missed finish, a speck of swarf on a prism, the IPD graduations far from accurate. I asked Opticron to comment. They replied: "As you would expect, the overall build quality wouldn’t be the same for the Adventurer T W/P at £79, as it would for something like, for example, the Aurora VHD at £799." I would emphasise that no defect appeared to detract from the optical performance. As for durability, Opticron offer a two-year warranty for this model, but I can comment no further due to the few months I have used it.

I am tempted to say that if I were required to keep just one of my binoculars it might well be the Adventurer 6.5x32. Whether your delight is to follow dragonflies, to watch a cormorant swallow an eel, to number a flock of wild geese or to marvel at the stars (when your pupillary dilation is decreased with age!) this little glass should be your good companion.
 

Charnwood

Active member
United Kingdom
Good review - I'm wondering about getting a pair of these as an inexpensive low magnification pair to use instead of my SRGAs when it rains. The two year warranty is a bit worrying though - how do they seem after 6 months usage ?
 

G.E.Williams

New member
United Kingdom
What's the difference between these and the new celestron Ultima Porro 6.5 x 32? They look virtually identical and have similar specs, although the Ultimas are nitrogen filled and claim a c.19" closer focus. The opticrons cost around £70 give or take, the celestrons around £120 upwards.
 

BKoh

Well-known member
Singapore
What's the difference between these and the new celestron Ultima Porro 6.5 x 32? They look virtually identical and have similar specs, although the Ultimas are nitrogen filled and claim a c.19" closer focus. The opticrons cost around £70 give or take, the celestrons around £120 upwards.
The specifications differ slightly (IPD, dimensions, weight, CF, N2), mostly favouring the Celestron, so it could be an improved version of the same optical design. Whether the coatings are better can only be known from actual tests/reviews. The limited lifetime warranty is welcome, but given that the Celestron is nearly twice the price, the Opticron may be the better value.
 

G.E.Williams

New member
United Kingdom
The specifications differ slightly (IPD, dimensions, weight, CF, N2), mostly favouring the Celestron, so it could be an improved version of the same optical design. Whether the coatings are better can only be known from actual tests/reviews. The limited lifetime warranty is welcome, but given that the Celestron is nearly twice the price, the Opticron may be the better value.
Thanks.
 
Good review - I'm wondering about getting a pair of these as an inexpensive low magnification pair to use instead of my SRGAs when it rains. The two year warranty is a bit worrying though - how do they seem after 6 months usage ?
They need a clean – evidence that it is my preferred glass! But I am not willing these days to stand out in the rain for long so I can not comment on their resistance to water even when fitted with a proper rainguard. Similarly, no going out on frosty nights to look at the stars, so I will not comment on possible fogging. Nonetheless a useful glass day or night, and a good bargain too.
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Supporter
They need a clean – evidence that it is my preferred glass! But I am not willing these days to stand out in the rain for long so I can not comment on their resistance to water even when fitted with a proper rainguard. Similarly, no going out on frosty nights to look at the stars, so I will not comment on possible fogging. Nonetheless a useful glass day or night, and a good bargain too.

Nice review Adrian. Of porros In this price range, the Opticron 6.5 x 32 WP is my fav of the often mentioned (and excellent) Kowa YF series in 6 and 8x and the 7x Nikon Action EX. No problems with the WP in several years of use on the beach including in rain and wading out into the surf with breakers splashing salt water spray on body and lenses. Routinely clean them under gentle running tap water with no water infiltration so far. In size and shape they are a very attractive slightly larger near clone of the Nikon E II 8x30. Great bins IME and a blistering bargain to boot. YMMV.

For anyone reading with interest, in the States the Opticron and Celestron are nearly identical in price based on a quick check today.

Mike
 
@mwhogue
<Routinely clean them under gentle running tap water with no water infiltration so far>
You what?!! This binocular is even better than I thought. I hesitated to comment on WP because Opticron state no standard for waterproofing. Many thanks for expanding my review.
 

BKoh

Well-known member
Singapore
For anyone reading with interest, in the States the Opticron and Celestron are nearly identical in price based on a quick check today.

Mike
Where are you seeing them for nearly the same price? Google shows the Opticron is listed on B&H for $90 and Adorama for $99, but doesn't show any US retailers for the Celestron.
 

mwhogue

Well Known Member
Supporter
Where are you seeing them for nearly the same price? Google shows the Opticron is listed on B&H for $90 and Adorama for $99, but doesn't show any US retailers for the Celestron.

You are right, I found the Celestron 6.5 only on the Celestron website with a list price of USD $89.95 but checking again today it is not available for purchase from any retailers in the US yet. Other models are available.

Mike
 

Binocollector

Well-known member
Germany
Nice review! I like mine too. One of the best "bang for the buck" binos (apart from used Japanese ones from ebay). It's rather solid, too. I like the metal parts on it, like the prism housing (apart from the cover plate that is) and ocular bridge. I think I might get another size of the Opticron Adventurer one day. Maybe the 8x32 (one of my favourite binos sizes are 8x30/32 binos).
 

Charnwood

Active member
United Kingdom
They need a clean – evidence that it is my preferred glass! But I am not willing these days to stand out in the rain for long so I can not comment on their resistance to water even when fitted with a proper rainguard. Similarly, no going out on frosty nights to look at the stars, so I will not comment on possible fogging. Nonetheless a useful glass day or night, and a good bargain too.
Adrian - thanks for the reply and to the other owners who have commented. I ordered a pair last week. They arrived a few days ago so I’ve not had much chance to use them but they seem a solid if basic set of Porros and handle nicely. Nice and sharp image in the centre but a fair bit of blur and distortion as you move towards the edge of the wide field of view. They seem really useful for scanning large areas and tracking fast moving birds in flight. I was lucky enough to see a couple of Peregrines through mine today.
 
Last edited:

Dipperdapper

Well-known member
Hello Adrian,

I just saw this thread having just completed a review of the 8x Adventurer T 8 x 32. See here:


I must say I agree with your assessment of these little porros.

Indeed, I am having a complete re-think of what a value bino really ought to be after testing the 8 x 32 out.

The Savanna 8 x 30 model is one helluva bino!!

I've been looking through roofs for far too long.

I'll post the results once I'm done.

Best wishes,

Neil.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top