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Advice on cleaning a roost (1 Viewer)

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
Cyprus
Tonight, for reasons best known only to her, my wife decided to open a louvred shutter on a fake window by our pool. Her reward, a face full of Pipistrelle!

I saw one really well before it took flight, very light grey, I thought they were black? All together, ten bats left the roost and inside is quite a pile of guano, this leads to my questions.

1. Are Pipistrelle's migratory? They were definitely not there over the winter.

2. Having a child who is often in close proximity to this roost during the day, does bat faeces present any potential risk and, if so, how can I clean it without disturbing the bats?

Below is the shutter where the roost is.
 

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Julie50

Mostly in the Midlands :)
United Kingdom
Hi Andy,

This has some useful info, but also about half way down a link to the National Bat Helpline, I know you are not UK based now, but surely they would still help!

In my experience, as a chemist of asbestos and as an allotmenter of mould spores, all is good as long as the “dust” is not airborne. The problem with bat faeces is that they are very dry and will become airborne if you attempt to clean them. Histoplasmosis is the problematic disease, it is caused by fungal spores, it is the one we have to be conscious of in the allotment.

Good luck!
 

Julie50

Mostly in the Midlands :)
United Kingdom
PS. It was the advice that histoplasmosis is only found in USA, African or South America, but this is no longer thought to be the case, still not common though!
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
I may be over-optimistic but if the problem is dust becoming airborne then the Aggie lemon-juice-soaked damp cloth is probably the answer?

For the grey bats you might want to consider Kuhl's Pip? Although I seem to remember also that bats in roosts have a habit of urinating on those lower down, bleaching the fur somewhat. Investing in a detector might well be a good idea, even a cheap one.

John
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
Cyprus
I may be over-optimistic but if the problem is dust becoming airborne then the Aggie lemon-juice-soaked damp cloth is probably the answer?

For the grey bats you might want to consider Kuhl's Pip? Although I seem to remember also that bats in roosts have a habit of urinating on those lower down, bleaching the fur somewhat. Investing in a detector might well be a good idea, even a cheap one.

John
Kuhl's isn't here but it looked like this.

 

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