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advice on new monitor (1 Viewer)

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Dear all,
I am discussing with myself whether I would benefit more from a 2k or 4k monitor. The size will be the same as my existing monitor (which is in the process of giving up). My current monitor is 2k and I have no complaints about it. My video card is 4k capable. My camera is able to take 4k videos, but I am mainly using it for stills. One concern is if buying a 4k monitor means that everything becomes smaller and I just would have to scale up in windows to compensate. (my eyes are getting older and not as good as they used to be).

Any input?

Niels
 

marcsantacurz

Well-known member
For photo editing, high-res monitors are not generally so good. Nice big pixels for viewing 100% is often best. That said, the 4k and 5k monitors are beautiful for viewing photos and videos on! I wanted something that would be good for gaming and work and most 4k monitors are not as fast as I'd like for games (or very expensive).

I recently got the LG 34GN850 which is a 21:9 WQHD monitor with 1ms refresh, 144Hz and G-sync. It's beautiful. 98% DCI-P3 for video. It's only 2K but for work the desktop is so large and big I can have stuff spread out all over and see it very well.

For photos, I use a Benq PD2700Q 27" 2k monitor, 100% sRGB on a different desk. I bought it refurb directly form Benq, so it was very affordable too.

Monitors are one of those things where there's really not one best monitor. It highly depends on what you will use it for.

Whatever you get, be sure to buy a good cable. Often the cables that come with the monitors are not the best. Display port is usually better than HDMI too, if your card will do it. Diglloyd.com has a lot to say about monitors if you want to poke around there.

Marc
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Niels, I think get the resolution that you use most, and that the processing is natively set up to do. From there, the most comfortable view will have the lowest latency, and highest scanning rate. Often the market moves to a point where there is a sweet spot of common technology and great value.

The bleeding edge of better performance costs relatively much more, and lower spec'd technology doesn't really save that much.

When I first got my 4K 65" LED TV about 6&1/2 years ago it was cutting edge and future proofed with the first HDMI 2.0 connector. Now such a display would cost about a quarter what I paid for mine. Free to Air 4K Broadcast content is still pretty much non existent ! It really shines at 3D HD Blue Ray which fully uses the 4K capability and has my preference of passive 3D glasses so it is very pleasant to watch and easy on the eye.

If I am watching content at other Broadcast resolutions, then the further it gets away from the native 4K (2160p) resolution, the worse the picture gets (with increasing artifacts). It looks great at 1080p, still very very good at 720p, but by the time it gets to Standard Definition Digital TV (576p) , or even worse 576i then artifacts become noticeable as do processing delays on fast moving frame changes. A lesser resolution display would actually do a better job at the lowest resolutions.

Computer monitors work somewhat like I have described, and also have to marry up to the computer system's operating frequency, bus sizes etc, and importantly how much grunt your graphics card has. If you know your system specs, and the bulk and top resolution of your content, then you can see if the matching monitor to the system will satisfactorily display your content cost effectively.






Chosun :gh:
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
Windows 10 will scale up accordingly to "cope" with a 4K screen, things look nice and crisp.

The problem can be with older software which was simply not designed for such pixel numbers, things look very small or just odd. These programs can be run in compatibility mode, which makes them useable but not as crisp as the scalable programs.

A major problem I have found is with printer dialogue boxes, some of these can't be scaled by Windows but they also can't be run in compatibility mode. I have been lucky that the supplier has updated drivers, but with older printers there maybe drivers that are compatible with Windows 10 but the dialogue boxes won't scale and are unreadable.

There doesn't seem to be a quick answer to if a program will scale well or not, it is often a case of just Googling to see if people have had problems and if and how they fixed them.
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
Thanks for all the input! I did pull the trigger on a 4k monitor, and I ended up with a Benq that was listed as optimized for design and photos. I am crossing my fingers that it will do the trick. This is purposefully not a gaming monitor because I do not do high speed games and most gaming monitors do funny stuff to the colors if I understand the specs correctly.

Niels
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
Thanks for all the input! I did pull the trigger on a 4k monitor, and I ended up with a Benq that was listed as optimized for design and photos. I am crossing my fingers that it will do the trick. This is purposefully not a gaming monitor because I do not do high speed games and most gaming monitors do funny stuff to the colors if I understand the specs correctly.

Niels

I'm sure it will look stunning.

Pity all those Canon R5 users who will need 8K capable displays for their videos ........
https://www.lg.com/au/tvs/lg-OLED88ZXPTA
:eek!::eek!::eek!::eek!:

We'll probably all be sitting in front of one ......one day ......
booking trips to Mars ! :-O






Chosun :gh:
 

marcsantacurz

Well-known member
Thanks for all the input! I did pull the trigger on a 4k monitor, and I ended up with a Benq that was listed as optimized for design and photos. I am crossing my fingers that it will do the trick. This is purposefully not a gaming monitor because I do not do high speed games and most gaming monitors do funny stuff to the colors if I understand the specs correctly.

Niels

Pick up the xrite calibration kit too. It works very well and if your monitor is a design/editing monitor, it likely is meant to be used with color calibration.

I've very happy with my Benq.

Marc
 

njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
I have had mine for a little more than a week now, and so far so good.

Niels
 

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