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AF fine tune (1 Viewer)

Musoman

PETE - Nikon Shooter
Hi Shrek
Your focusing seems to be improving, so well done. The last photo of a pair of Gold Finches ( i didnt check any others ) the ISO is still too high at 22,800. Even more so because you haven't got into processing yet.

That 36,000 ISO above has been processed.

Try reducing the ISO to 1600 ( dont use auto ISO ) and try brighter days for your photos. Not easy at this time of year in the UK, i know
 

MikeInPA

Well-known member
Stroking the release has made a difference , I really was stabbing at it and had never noticed how jerky I was.. I seem to like the slightly darker pictures to the really bright ones !!
Well done Shrek, I am so jealous of the Long-tailed Tits. When I last came over in 2019 in May/June 2019 I was hoping to photograph those little beauties. I didn't see one I'm afraid. I didn't see a lot of birds that were common in gardens 20 years ago but sadly pesticides put an end to that. I did 3000 miles and the only bugs on the front of the rental car were Scottish bugs. Your garden must be full of bugs(y)
 

Weasel1

Well-known member
Supporter
United Kingdom
Have to agree, your focusing looks to be improving so well done on that.

Also, have to agree with regards to Auto ISO, it's going way too high when left to it's own devices, so like Musoman says try it at 1600 and see the clarity and sharpness improve.
 

MikeInPA

Well-known member
OK Shrek, you'll either love this or hate this. My advice is try it and persevere with it for a while. I've done it all of my camera's for the last 16 years. I think it will help you with your focussing even more. The default for the focusing is a half press of the shutter release to focus followed by a full press to trigger the shutter. If you rush to get a shot you could miss the focus by triggering before it's fully focussed. There's a setting which won't trigger the shutter unless it detects that you are in focus or alternatively you can set it to focus irrespective of whether your focused or not. This is always how I set my AF-C Continuous Auto Focus on all my camera's. Getting back to Back Button Focussing as it's called you focus using your right thumb and trigger the shutter with your index finger as normal. If you set your focussing mode to AF-C and press the Back Button it will continuously focus at whatever is under your focus point until you release it. Because it's continuous AF it compensates all the time for movement of the subject. When you get the pose you want roll your finger over the shutter release and as your already focussed you'll get a better shot. You never need AF-S (Single Focus Mode) because you simply focus with the BBF (Back Button Focussing) on your subject then release the BB and it will stop focussing and stay where it was. This is handy for people standing still, you focus on their face for instance then you let go of the BB and recompose the shot and it stays in focus so simply press the shutter release.

Try it and give it a go. I think it will help. Heres a video on how to set it up on your D7200.

D7200 Back Button Focussing
 

shrek48

Well-known member
OK Shrek, you'll either love this or hate this. My advice is try it and persevere with it for a while. I've done it all of my camera's for the last 16 years. I think it will help you with your focussing even more. The default for the focusing is a half press of the shutter release to focus followed by a full press to trigger the shutter. If you rush to get a shot you could miss the focus by triggering before it's fully focussed. There's a setting which won't trigger the shutter unless it detects that you are in focus or alternatively you can set it to focus irrespective of whether your focused or not. This is always how I set my AF-C Continuous Auto Focus on all my camera's. Getting back to Back Button Focussing as it's called you focus using your right thumb and trigger the shutter with your index finger as normal. If you set your focussing mode to AF-C and press the Back Button it will continuously focus at whatever is under your focus point until you release it. Because it's continuous AF it compensates all the time for movement of the subject. When you get the pose you want roll your finger over the shutter release and as your already focussed you'll get a better shot. You never need AF-S (Single Focus Mode) because you simply focus with the BBF (Back Button Focussing) on your subject then release the BB and it will stop focussing and stay where it was. This is handy for people standing still, you focus on their face for instance then you let go of the BB and recompose the shot and it stays in focus so simply press the shutter release.

Try it and give it a go. I think it will help. Heres a video on how to set it up on your D7200.

D7200 Back Button Focussing
Thanks Mike, I already use back focus as normal focusing with shutter release was a nightmare for me. thanks
 

shrek48

Well-known member
I am a tad confused because yesterday I came off ISO auto which was at 100 and I set it to 200 and the pictures was totally blacked out ?????
 

shrek48

Well-known member
Again I tried ISO to 1600 etc and just black HELP !!!
 

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shrek48

Well-known member
I think I may have just started to understand a tiny bit and have managed to change my ISO and get a few pictures I am happy with !
 

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Musoman

PETE - Nikon Shooter
The reason your 2 dark pictures are that dark is because you're using to high an aperture at F11. At that aperture, you're getting 1/8000 th shutter speed which is not letting in enough light.

I'm wondering what settings you are using on the top left dial. Also, change metering from multi to spot and see what happens

Can you say what other settings you are using ?
 

MikeInPA

Well-known member
I think I may have just started to understand a tiny bit and have managed to change my ISO and get a few pictures I am happy with !
Getting better all the time, but room for improvement.

Looking at the EXIF data for DSC_8191 it says 1/1000s f/10 ISO6400. If you drop down to f/7.1 or f/8 your shutter speed will go up but it would be better to drop your ISO down even more which will help with reducing noise.

What is also noticeable is that you have blown Highlights because the image is overexposed. This means that there is no data at all in the whites. As Musoman says you could try changing to Spot Metering with would help but a better solution would be to enter the realms of Exposure Compensation or Exposure Bias or Exposure Value (EV) they're all the same thing with different names. This is the button to the right of your ISO button. You hold it down and rotate either the Front or Rear Dial ( probably the rear button, it is on mine) to override the camera's exposure determination, because it doesn't always get it right. You can override it in either 1/2 or 1/3 increments either + or -. In your case for this image you would need to drop it down to probably -0.7 or -1.0. What this effectively does by entering a minus compensation is that you would make the whole image darker by increasing the shutter speed to gather less light so consider it a bonus. It's not as confusing as it sounds. Focus on a fixed target and take a shot without compensation, then take the same shot (in the same lighting) with both Plus and Minus compensations and see for yourself the change in shutter speed and the effect on the image.

If you're struggling to grasp this let us know and we'll help you with it.

You can set your image review to display what's commonly know as "blinkies" these flash any areas of the image that are over exposed. Not sure on the D7200 how to do it so it's a case of RTFM I'm afraid.
 

Musoman

PETE - Nikon Shooter
Good points made Mike.

Pedantic sentence coming up .... Exposure Compensation / Bias is the action by which you can change the exposure. Exposure value ( EV ) is the setting you use, as you say - 0.1 -0.3 and so on or + 0.1 + 0.3 etc etc
 

MikeInPA

Well-known member
Good points made Mike.

Pedantic sentence coming up .... Exposure Compensation / Bias is the action by which you can change the exposure. Exposure value ( EV ) is the setting you use, as you say - 0.1 -0.3 and so on or + 0.1 + 0.3 etc etc
Thanks. Yes you are quite correct.

If you want to be pedantic 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣 and I’m smiling as I write this. You cant select 0.1. If you have 1/2 stops selected it‘s +/- 0.5 or 1.0 etc. If 1/3 stop it‘s +/- 0.3, 0.7 or 1.0.

🤣

🍺
 

Musoman

PETE - Nikon Shooter
I didnt need EV, so Spot meter, Aperture Priority and 500mm at F5 , ISO 400 ........gave me a shutter of 1/3200. Mind you it was lovely weather on the Somerset Levels that day
Used a Nikon D610 Full frame and Nikon 500mm F4 Mkll Great White Egret.jpg
 

shrek48

Well-known member
ok, way over my stupid head but thanks for all the help, I will endeavor to repay your continuing help by improving but I am enjoying the help and trying out the tasks u set me. I am really happy with some of my results now so will keep on playing... "EV" might have to wait until I am confident with speed, F stop & ISO ;-)
I am a very slow learner these days sadly and cannot practice everyday as my health will not allow, but love my camera and the birds, thanks all please keep posting an helping ....
 

Weasel1

Well-known member
Supporter
United Kingdom
Just keep practicing when you can, shrek...the improvements are there for sure, some great advice above from the guys.
 

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