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Albatross - Antarctica from a survey ship (1 Viewer)

Graham Moffat

Active member
Hi Folks
Am I right in thinking these are Wandering Albatross? The images were taken from a survey ship at sea in the Antarctic a few days ago.
Thanks and best wishes
Graham
 

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Graham Moffat

Active member
Hi Folks
Thanks for the quick replies and things to think about. Friend of mine is a geologist who is in the area just now but I don't know which ship Andrew, sorry - will try to find out. Sightings were between Falklands and the Antarctic peninsula. Thanks again.
Best wishes
Graham
 

DMW

Well-known member
It looks to me like what they call in the new Argentina guide Tristan, Diomedes exulans antipodensis, adult male?
It could well be. Howell & Zufelt suggest that ID of these plumages are usually based on range, but perhaps there's a diagnostic feature. I guess Snowy would be the most likely on range, but these birds do get around!
 

Graham Moffat

Active member
Andrew - sorry, still don't know which ship but my friend is saying that the James Clark Ross had its last trip to Antarctica this season and is to be replaced by the Attenborough next season I think. Hope it's OK that this post is not directly bird-related.
BW Graham
 

Butty

Well-known member
Not illustrated in the new Argentina field guide?
(Some) black on tail of southern royal albatross is shown, and described, in Argentina FG. Also Pizzey Australia FG shows lots of black on tail of southern royal albatross. I've not looked further.
The juv southern royal albatross in the Argentina guide is actually fairly like this bird - though the imm wandering albatross is a bit more like it.

The new Seabird book will be out soon, that should be definitive I hope.
Ditto assuming/hoping.

Another feature which 'should' be visible on this shot, is the dark, cutting edge to the bill of S-R.
O, crikey, no - that's really narrow and difficult to see - nothing like as obvious as in Argentina FG paintings. Even in close-up head-shots you're left wondering if it's just the shadow of the edge of the upper mandible.
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
O, crikey, no - that's really narrow and difficult to see - nothing like as obvious as in Argentina FG paintings. Even in close-up head-shots you're left wondering if it's just the shadow of the edge of the upper mandible.
Images such as this, make me think it should be visible, it also makes me wonder how many images are wrongly identified on Google.

 

John_WA

Well-known member
Definitely a Wandering type, and in that location Snowy (exulans) or Tristan (dabbenena) probably most likely, plumage suitable for both of them and bill/head structure not clear enough for me to make a guess. gibsoni also not excludable on plumage, probably less likely at that location.

It looks to me like what they call in the new Argentina guide Tristan, Diomedes exulans antipodensis, adult male?

I don't have that guide, but Tristan should be Diomeda [exulans] dabbenena, antipodensis is one of the NZ taxa

It could well be. Howell & Zufelt suggest that ID of these plumages are usually based on range, but perhaps there's a diagnostic feature. I guess Snowy would be the most likely on range, but these birds do get around!

This plumage could suit any of Snowy, Tristan or Gibson's

How does one exclude immature southern royal albatross?

The brown vermiculations on the body, shape and extent of white extending onto scapulars, head/bill shape all useful

Also present to some degree in immature southern royal albatross from what I've read.
Indeed, though this would be very much at the most extensive end for dark tail in a Southern Royal
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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