• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

All things White-tailed Eagle (1 Viewer)

Chris Monk

Well-known member
Chris Monk said:
White-tailed Eagles

Please find details of the Irish plan to introduce this species below:

http://today.reuters.com/news/artic...LAND-EAGLES.xml

http://www.utvlive.com/newsroom/ind...p?id=79045&pt=n

Kerry farmers cry fowl as eagle returns

Thursday, January 18, 2007
http://www.the-kingdom.ie/news/story.asp?j=22990

Kerry farmers cry fowl as eagle returns
By: Eve Kelliher

THE planned re-introduction of the white-tailed eagle to Kerry has
raised further objections from dismayed farmers in the county.

Alternative farming will be directly affected with the planned
re-introduction of the bird, claim members of the county's farming
community.

This will add a further burden to farm property and will inevitably
decrease the value of property of farmers, they say.

The re-introduction of the eagle will entail another special area of
conservation (SAC) being set aside.

But the designation of special areas of conservation in Kerry is
pushing farmers in the county out of existence, claims local members of
the Irish Farmers' Association. The county chairman of the Kerry
branch of the IFA, John Stack, said he was frustrated at the number of
special areas of conservation that have been set aside in the county.

"There are five different Sac designations already in place - for the
hen harrier, raised bogs, chuff, salmon and pearl mussel. Now we are
going to have another for the white tailed eagle," he said, adding
that Kerry farm-ers would soon be "desig-nated out of existence".
Last week the IFA also raised concerns that the eagles have the capacity
to lift lambs and fish for salmon which have been designated as an
endangered species.

The planned reintroduction of the white-tailed sea eagle to Killarney
National Park will see the first 15 eaglets released in Kerry this
summer.

The main diet of the white-tailed sea eagle is dead meat, mainly
whales, porpoises and seals washed up on the coastline. This species of
eagle is the fourth largest in the world and bigger than their better
known cousins the Golden Eagle.
 

guyandzoe

New member
We watched our local pair of white tailed sea eagles mating on Sunday 4 March in gale force winds. Looking forwards to chicks again.

guy
 

Markus Jais

Well-known member
hi Chris

great idea. this is a very interesting collection of information
about one of the most spectacular birds in the world.

let's hope that the new projects on eastern Scotland and Ireland
are successful and the populations in Scandinavia, Germany, Poland and other countries continue to increase.

Markus
 

Chris Monk

Well-known member
White-tailed Eagles Return To Oostvaardersplassen, Netherlands

http://www.magnificentfrigatebird.c...aardersplassen/

White-tailed Eagles Return To Oostvaardersplassen :clap:

Posted by Amy on Wednesday, March 7th, 2007 at 12:30 pm CET in Netherlands

The pair of White-tailed Eagles that successfully fledged a chick last year in the Oostvaardersplassen in the Netherlands has returned. They were the first White-tailed Eagles to breed in the Netherlands since the Middle Ages.

The pair are busy preparing the nest which they used last year. A webcam has been placed on the nest so visitors will be able to observe the birds. The exact location of the nest has not been revealed to the public and the area remains inaccessible so as to not disturb the birds. The webcam will be broadcast on the website www.staatsbosbeheer.nl from 08 March.

The pair successfully fledged one chick last year. The young eagle is living close to the area it was born and has been spotted around the Oosvaardersplassen throughout the seasons. The sex of the bird is unknown.

The Oostvaardersplassen is an ideal area for the eagles to breed as they can remain all year. They usually sustain on fish but in the winter if the fish supply is diminished they will also feed on deer carcasses.

Source: Zeearenden nestelen weer in Oostvaardersplassen
 

Chris Monk

Well-known member
Taoiseach signs petition to re-introduce sea eagles to the Kingdom

http://kerrynews.wordpress.com/2007...on-to-re-introduce-sea-eagles-to-the-kingdom/

TAOISEACH Bertie Ahern and Tourism Minister John O’Donoghue have signed a petition supporting a plan to re-introduce white-tailed sea eagles to Kerry, it was revealed yesterday.

A claim by Cllr Michael Healy-Rae that “every second’’ lamb in Kerry would be killed by the eagles, was described by Cllr Michael Gleeson as “patently incorrect.” Mr Gleeson, however, said, while it was possible the eagles would take an occasional lamb, the lambs would be quite safe 999 times out of 1,000.

“This a project that will attract thousands of people to this county and, as well as being a novel conservation project, it will greatly enrich our economy,’’ he added.

He said the Taoiseach signed the petition backing the project during a recent visit to Kerry.

Read more in the Irish Examiner: http://www.examiner.ie/story/?jp=CWQLOJIDEY&cat=Ireland&rss=rss2

13 March 2007

Taoiseach signs petition to re-introduce sea eagles to the Kingdom
By Donal Hickey

TAOISEACH Bertie Ahern and Tourism Minister John O’Donoghue have signed a petition supporting a plan to re-introduce white-tailed sea eagles to Kerry, it was revealed yesterday.

A claim by Cllr Michael Healy-Rae that "every second’’ lamb in Kerry would be killed by the eagles, was described by Cllr Michael Gleeson as "patently incorrect." Mr Gleeson, however, said, while it was possible the eagles would take an occasional lamb, the lambs would be quite safe 999 times out of 1,000.

"This a project that will attract thousands of people to this county and, as well as being a novel conservation project, it will greatly enrich our economy,’’ he added.

He said the Taoiseach signed the petition backing the project during a recent visit to Kerry.

Meanwhile, a group supporting a controversial plan to reintroduce the eagle has claimed widespread backing for the project. Group chairman Jerry O’Grady, of Killarney, said they had 6,000 signatures and were confident of getting 10,000.

Killarney Town Council has also approved €10,000 for the project and the Killarney National Park Liaison Committee has unanimously voted in favour of it.

However, there’s strong farmer opposition, with Kerry IFA claiming the eagles would kill lambs and that more land would be designated for conservation purposes.

A delegation from the IFA is meeting with Environment minister Dick Roche tomorrow on the matter. They say "the broader picture" which includes area species conservation designations, and the handling of the red deer, is not being looked at and they reject idea of narrowness.

"It isn’t the bird that’s the issue. The real issue is it’s going to affect the value of our properties," Flor McCarthy, chairman of the Kerry Rural development committee said.

Environment Minister Dick Roche has fully endorsed the project.
 

Jos Stratford

Eastern Exile
Europe
Hi there Chris, plenty of stuff on here for a few hours read ;) My pair are back - sat on the ice yesterday shouting and displaying to each other, two youngsters looking on. Always a great bird - please don't introduce them into any parts of the UK ...takes away one of the special reasons to live here ;)
 

deborah4

Well-known member
Hello Chris

Many thanks for the updates, it's a great idea to put them all under one roof so to speak!

As for WTE's 'being under same roof' as GEs, I wonder if perhaps you could put my mind at rest on one small point regarding optimum territorial space and potential conflict if any with GEs. It's something that's been niggling at me for some time. As such, I raised the issue with one of the wardens on Mull last year who confirmed that WTE will vigourously defend their territorial space against GE and so was in no danger of being 'pushed' from existing territories on Mull. However, I have also heard snippits of information where GE will also likewise defend existing territories against WTE. Where there are no existing breeding pairs of GE, such as in Wales, then a re-introduction scheme presumably would not present a problem. However, suitable sized breeding habitat, with adequate territorial space for either species in UK must have its limits, far more so than in continental Europe and Scandinavia. The GE is still struggling in Scotland, and it seems, from public info available, barely surviving as a breeding species in what is fairly restricted suitable habitat in the rest of the UK. The combination of windfarms and persecution puts further pressure on the prognosis for continuing sustainable populations of GEs in Scotland let alone WTEs. Recently, apparently one such territorial conflict between a WTE and GE ended in the death of the GE (I'll email re: this). Could the amount of land available as suitable habitat in the UK effect the extent, if any, that territorial disputes could be a potential problem for our current population of GEs? I would very much like to see both species secure in these Isles but not at the expense of further re-introductions in new areas being at the expense of maintaining existing populations of either species in other areas. Even with sedentary populations, is there potential overlap with continued re-introduction, if not now, in the future with dispersal of offspring from successful re-introduced populations? I'm sure my concerns arise from ignorance but would be grateful to know for sure!!

Please reply by email if you wish - and thank you for your continued email updates.

Kind regards
 

Chris Monk

Well-known member
deborah4 said:
Hello Chris

Many thanks for the updates, it's a great idea to put them all under one roof so to speak!

As for WTE's 'being under same roof' as GEs, I wonder if perhaps you could put my mind at rest on one small point regarding optimum territorial space and potential conflict if any with GEs. It's something that's been niggling at me for some time. As such, I raised the issue with one of the wardens on Mull last year who confirmed that WTE will vigourously defend their territorial space against GE and so was in no danger of being 'pushed' from existing territories on Mull. However, I have also heard snippits of information where GE will also likewise defend existing territories against WTE. Where there are no existing breeding pairs of GE, such as in Wales, then a re-introduction scheme presumably would not present a problem. However, suitable sized breeding habitat, with adequate territorial space for either species in UK must have its limits, far more so than in continental Europe and Scandinavia. The GE is still struggling in Scotland, and it seems, from public info available, barely surviving as a breeding species in what is fairly restricted suitable habitat in the rest of the UK. The combination of windfarms and persecution puts further pressure on the prognosis for continuing sustainable populations of GEs in Scotland let alone WTEs. Recently, apparently one such territorial conflict between a WTE and GE ended in the death of the GE (I'll email re: this). Could the amount of land available as suitable habitat in the UK effect the extent, if any, that territorial disputes could be a potential problem for our current population of GEs? I would very much like to see both species secure in these Isles but not at the expense of further re-introductions in new areas being at the expense of maintaining existing populations of either species in other areas. Even with sedentary populations, is there potential overlap with continued re-introduction, if not now, in the future with dispersal of offspring from successful re-introduced populations? I'm sure my concerns arise from ignorance but would be grateful to know for sure!!

Please reply by email if you wish - and thank you for your continued email updates.

Kind regards

Hmm, Deborah....

I'm adding this to the thread instead of a PM as I thought it might be of some interest.

Where to begin? I know this was looked into before the first WTEs were brought over to Rhum by the Nature Conservancy Council and the RSPB. I remember this being a concern and people in Norway and Sweden such as Wilgohs and Helander were consulted. This was eventually resolved to the satisfaction of the powers that be. John Love the project officer wrote a book on the species and the scheme. I've tried both Google: http://www.google.co.uk/ and Google Scholar: http://scholar.google.com/ :scribe:

Wikipedia has this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-tailed_Eagle on the two species but it may be an over-simplification:

"The territory of the White-tailed Eagle ranges between 30 and 70 km², normally in sheltered coastal locations. Sometimes they are found in-land by lakes and along river systems. The territory of the White-tailed Eagles can overlap with the territory of the golden eagle, though competition between the two species is limited. Golden eagles prefer mountains and moorland, while the White-tailed Eagle prefers the coast and the sea."

This article in British Birds looks at the topic and summarises thus:

http://md1.csa.com/partners/viewrecord.php?requester=gs&collection=ENV&recid=4426725

Golden and white-tailed Eagles in Scotland and Norway coexistence, competition and environmental degradation

Halley, DJ
British Birds [BR. BIRDS]. Vol. 91, no. 5, pp. 171-179. May 1998.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, both the White-tailed Eagle Haliaeetus albicilla and the Golden Eagle Aquila chrysaetos lived in Scotland, but their ranges there were segregated, the latter's distribution seemingly restricted by competition from the White-tailed; Golden Eagles colonised the Scottish range of White-tailed Eagle following that species' extermination in the early twentieth century. In Norway, the breeding ranges of the two species have apparently always overlapped in coastal areas. The diets of Golden Eagles and re-established White-tailed Eagles in Scotland appear to be very similar, largely through the reliance of both species on sheep and deer carrion, whereas, in Norway, these two eagles rely far less on carrion and differ greatly in their diets. Although Golden Eagles are wholly dominant in direct competition, White-tailed Eagles are nevertheless able to outcompete them through having a wider spectrum of available prey. Increased competition and resulting competitive exclusion in western Scotland appear to be a consequence of long-term environmental degradation of the region through deforestation and overgrazing.

I'll keep digging but these two are the only really relevant articles I could find during my coffee break! HTH.

Have you got my work email address? If not please say and I'll PM you it.

All the best and thanks for your interest.

Cheers,
Chris
 

Chris Monk

Well-known member
White Tailed Eagle- Vaasa, Finland

Two newborn White Tailed Eagles in new nest, with young parents with thier first "babys" in Vaasa, Finland.

Here the picture White Tailed from Vaasa the other one learning to fly and land on a forrest road near the nest: http://netti.nic.fi/~tapioo/White-Tailed-Vaasa-Finland.jpg

I would very much to have a White Tailed Eagles "song" as a RINGTONE. Does anyone have a MP3 clip from White Tailed Eagle?
 

deborah4

Well-known member
Hi Chris

Is There Competion Between the reintroduced White Tailed Eagle and Golden Eagle in Scotland?

Apologies for taking so long to get back to you. Thanks for following up my original enquiry and for the links. I've posted a response on here following your interest to do so. It's hard to find research on this however, I have found some relevant material but you may be able to follow through on some of the Ornithologists referenced:



''In the UK the golden eagle and white-tailed eagle live in mutually exclusive home-ranges, unlike in Norway, where the two species can readily coexist. The diets of the two species are very similar in the UK, and there is prominent competition for food between the species. When in direct competition for carcasses in the winter, golden eagles are strongly dominant over white-tailed eagles. Being stronger fliers, golden eagles also prevail in aerial conflicts. However, despite being inferior in direct conflict, white-tailed eagle is overall the dominant species of the two, and can oust golden eagles from their home ranges. They are more tenacious, have a wider diet and can survive on less food than the golden eagle. Competition for nest sites is unlikely to be important, since white-tailed eagles nest preferentially in trees and golden eagles on cliff ledges. The great similarity in the diet and the apparent inability of the two eagles to coexist in western Scotland has been brought about by several centuries of deforestation and overgrazing, which has impoverished and degraded the habitat, reducing its ability to support higher densities of these top predators.''

http://www.arlelodge.co.uk/backpacking-mull.html



Dominance over carcasses in winter backed up by this eye witness account:

http://www.naturephotographers.net/benvie1200-1.html

My thoughts are competition for nest sites apparently not of high concern (although deforestation - and not yet recovered -of traditional nesting ground of WTE in NE Scotland (prior to extinction in UK) could change this in future as WTE expands it's range from West Coast. However, should this be the case, the overall dominance of the species (due to more flexible feeding habits) could result in direct inter-specific competition in the future for territorial ranges which supply both optimum nesting locations and available prey, in which the WTE could prove the more successful species over GEs, populations in the UK.

Whitfield et al asked ''Is there competition between the reintroduced White Tailed Eagle and Golden Eagles in Western Scotland?''

I've not found the original article but it is referenced in this paragraph taken from the Final Report on ''The Impact of White Tailed Eagles on Sheep Farming in Mull'' - M. Marquiss, M Madders, J Irvine & DN Carss
(Contract Number ITE 004/99).

6.2.2 Restoration of Biodiversity

''The underlying aim of a reintroduction is to reinstate biodiversity so that ecological communities are restored to their intrinsic richness. This has been achieved in as much as WTEs are now established on Mull, Skye and elsewhere but it is still not clear whether or not the addition of this species will lead to detectable changes in other organisms. This should not be a issue if the only aim is to restore biological richness but in practice an impact of a reintroduced species on others of conservation concern would question this basic premise. As yet too few WTEs are present to properly gauge their impact on the populations of wild prey or competitors. Substantial impact seems unlikely, BUT (my caps) eg. it is possible that WTEs compete with GEs for prey or nesting sites and might oust them from some areas. As YET, (my caps) there is no clear evidence of it but monitoring continues.'' White et al (ibid)


My own conclusions from both the reading thus far, given apparent lack of projected impacts, is there seems a least a basis for proceeding very cautiously indeed with further WTE introductions without further research into potential impact on Golden Eagle populations in mainland Scotland. This is based on the specific geographical (sustainable population size -v- space available) linked directly to factors such as environmental (deforestation, agricultural impact, drive for windfarm installations) and agricultural/persecution conditions in sum total being specific to the UK - and of great concern to existing populations of Golden Eagle in NE Scotland. There doesn't seem to be any 'natural' and inherent characteristics why both species can not co-exist in continental Europe or Scandinavia (noting the successes reported from Norway and Jos's observations of other inter-species reactions in Lit) but there are UK specific factors which could suggest potential difficulties in the future for GEs with further expansion of WTEs.

Perhaps timescale between each localised reintroduction might prove the deciding factor in assessing potential impact? Ie. allowing for expansion of existing WTE populations over a number of years before further reintroduction projects?
 
Warning! This thread is more than 12 years ago old.
It's likely that no further discussion is required, in which case we recommend starting a new thread. If however you feel your response is required you can still do so.

Users who are viewing this thread

Top