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Alresford, Hampshire, England Help with bird ID please (1 Viewer)

Dave Derrick

Well-known member
England
Photos taken this week in rural area just outside Alresford. Want to say Corn Bunting, but not convinced. Twite a possibility ? The area has had Corn Bunting for years, but there were at least 15 in a single flock. Help please. Many thanks, Dave.
 

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PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Photos taken this week in rural area just outside Alresford. Want to say Corn Bunting, but not convinced. Twite a possibility ? The area has had Corn Bunting for years, but there were at least 15 in a single flock. Help please. Many thanks, Dave.

'Not twite. 'Certainly a bunting. I only ever see reed buntings and will be interested to hear what this bird is. I'm looking at this bird thinking it's probably not a female reed bunting and is a corn bunting.

Edited to add: I think this bird is missing the eye mark of a female reed bunting.
 

Alexander Stöhr

Well-known member
Hello Dave,
I agree with you, Paul and Pat all are Corn Buntings., the single bird (picture 1+2) and the flock in the last picture.
A Twite hiding among a flock of other birds looks like this (with a Tree Sparrow. Fiener Bruch near Paplitz, NE-Germany, 10.11. 2019)

Please compare the uniform caramell-hued and unmarked throat (like every pattern there is erased by a extensive rubbering), the stubby bill and the narrow, notched tail (not so extremer in Corn Bunting).
But you have surely noticed this in the field, which gave you the gut-feeling, that these are Corn Buntings. You might havent noticed consciously, but thats jizz identification.
I have written this before: Corn Bunting is one of those birds that you should stick with your initial, emotional jizz identification. If you see a bunting and think its a Corn Bunting, than its not a good idea to look at this bird longer and beginning to rethinking your identification.
 

Dave Derrick

Well-known member
England
Very many thanks for all confirming what I should have been more confident about from the start.

And, yes, Alexander, I know I should but I do find it hard to really trust sufficiently in my initial, emotional jizz identification; not for the first time, thanks for reminding me. Cheers, Dave.
 

Muppit17

Well-known member
Very many thanks for all confirming what I should have been more confident about from the start.

And, yes, Alexander, I know I should but I do find it hard to really trust sufficiently in my initial, emotional jizz identification; not for the first time, thanks for reminding me. Cheers, Dave.
There have been reasonable numbers of Corn Bunting this winter to the south of Arlesford reported from both Gander Down & Cheesefoot head. Please report locally if elsewhere
 

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