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Ancient DNA from Nesotrochis steganinos (1 Viewer)

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Jessica A. Oswald, Ryan S. Terrill, Brian J. Stucky, Michel J. Lefebvre, David W. Steadman, Robert P. Guralnick & Jullie M. Allen, 2021

Ancient DNA from the extinct Haitian cave-rail (Nesotrochis steganinos) suggests a biogeographic connection between the Caribbean and Old World

Biology Letters. 17 (3): Article ID 20200760.
doi:10.1098/rsbl.2020.0760

Abstract:
Worldwide decline in biodiversity during the Holocene has impeded a comprehensive understanding of pre-human biodiversity and biogeography. This is especially true on islands, because many recently extinct island taxa were morphologically unique, complicating assessment of their evolutionary relationships using morphology alone. The Caribbean remains an avian hotspot but was more diverse before human arrival in the Holocene. Among the recently extinct lineages is the enigmatic genus Nesotrochis, comprising three flightless species. Based on morphology, Nesotrochis has been considered an aberrant rail (Rallidae) or related to flufftails (Sarothruridae). We recovered a nearly complete mitochondrial genome of Nesotrochis steganinos from fossils, discovering that it is not a rallid but instead is sister to Sarothruridae, volant birds now restricted to Africa and New Guinea, and the recently extinct, flightless Aptornithidae of New Zealand. This result suggests a widespread or highly dispersive most recent common ancestor of the group. Prior to human settlement, the Caribbean avifauna had a far more cosmopolitan origin than is evident from extant species.

Footnotes

Electronic supplementary material is available online at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.5326660.

Enjoy,

Fred
 

Melanie

Well-known member
It might be interesting to know when Nesotrochis will got it's own family. Currently it is incertae sedis within Gruiformes
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
It might be interesting to know when Nesotrochis will got it's own family. Currently it is incertae sedis within Gruiformes
Most recently, two species of Nesotrochis were included in a large phylogeny of Rallidae showing that Nesotrochis was paraphyletic with Aramides. We could suppose that Nesotrochis steganinos integrates the family Sarothruridae into a new genus (this is inevitable)
 

Melanie

Well-known member
There is an error in text: Instead of Nesotrochis picipicensis it must be spelled Nesotrochis picapicensis.
 

gusasp

Well-known member
This is exciting stuff! Garcia-R & Matzke 2021 has steganinos as one of the two morphologically re-examined Nesotrochis and place it outside debooyi+Aramides, at odds with the above study. Which makes me wonder how trustworthy Garcia-R & Matzke 2021 is. A LOT of weird stuff in there, Porzana menehune from Molokai sister to Laterallus levraudi for instance. Anyone has a clue?
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Olson already state in 1974 that Nesotrochis debooyi is not relative to Aramides but merely to an common ancestor of Gallinula.


And I wonder that they have only sequenced the DNA of Nestotrochis steganinos because It would be also interesting to learn about the relationsships within the genus Nesotrochis.
 

Melanie

Well-known member
Send ๐Ÿ˜‰ check your mail
Thank you very much.

Well I've just seen the cladogram but I don't know how serious I should take this classification. As I have written above Nesotrochis debooyi is NOT relative to Aramides (see Wetmore 1937 and Olson 1974). Mundia elpenor is still regarded as Atlantisia elpenor.
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
Thank you very much.

Well I've just seen the cladogram but I don't know how serious I should take this classification. As I have written above Nesotrochis debooyi is NOT relative to Aramides (see Wetmore 1937 and Olson 1974). Mundia elpenor is still regarded as Atlantisia elpenor.

Please look at W. R. P. Bourne, N. P. Ashmole & K. E. L. Simmons, 2003
A New Subfossil Night Heron and a New Genus for the Extinct Rail for Ascension Island, Central Tropical Atlantic Ocean
Ardea 91: 45-51
http://ardea.nou.nu/ardeapdf/a91-045-051.pdf

Here you can read why Atlantisia can't be used for Mundis elpenor (Olson. 1974),

Fred
 

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