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Another mass poisoning of vultures in Asia (1 Viewer)

Robert Piller

Well-known member
Another mass poisoning of vultures in Asia – at least 20 Himalayan griffon vultures dead in India

The latest mass poisoning incident was reported this 8 March, when at least 20 Himalayan griffon vultures were found dead in a paddyfield at Lahon Gaon, Konwarpur, in the Sivasagar district in Assam (India). Seven vultures could be rescues by Forest rangers and are under treatment. Last January at least 51 vultures had already been found poisoned in the same district.

The Vulture carcasses have been taken for toxicology analysis by staff from the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) to determine the type of poison used.


Vultures underwent a catastrophic decline in the Indian sub-continent, due to the use of the veterinary use of diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory drug. Following years of campaigning by environmental activists, a ban on the drug is now in place, and some species are starting to recover, but these latest poisoning are a blow to the conservation of the species.

Poisoning – by veterinary drugs like diclofenac or other substances used against predators – is the biggest threat to vultures worldwide. Vultures are keystone species that play vital roles in maintaining ecosystem health. Their removal and depletion have a number of cascading negative ecological effects as well as adverse impacts on human health.

The precipitous decline in three vulture species on the Indian sub-continent over the last 20 years has resulted in a number of problems emerging due to the vultures no longer being able to fulfil their role of removing the carcasses of dead animals from the environment. A proliferation of feral dogs and a substantial increase in diseases such as rabies have been documented and can be linked directly to this decline.

http://raptorpolitics.org.uk/2015/0...-20-himalayan-griffon-vultures-dead-in-india/

The VCF and its partners have been working on anti-poisoning activities, campaigns and programmes in Europe. Please check the link below for more details.

http://www.4vultures.org/our-work/anti-poisoning/international-workshop-african-vultures-poisoning/


It's not just veterinary use either. They practice sky-burials in many of these countries, an otherwise excellent way of disposing of the dead, no trees chopped down and feeding the Vultures too. I certainly wouldn't mind it for myself. But the combination of diclofenac and sky-burials would be a deadly one.
 

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MJB

Well-known member
Another mass poisoning of vultures in Asia – at least 20 Himalayan griffon vultures dead in India

The latest mass poisoning incident was reported this 8 March, when at least 20 Himalayan griffon vultures were found dead in a paddyfield at Lahon Gaon, Konwarpur, in the Sivasagar district in Assam (India). Last January at least 51 vultures had already been found poisoned in the same district.

The Vulture carcasses have been taken for toxicology analysis by staff from the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) to determine the type of poison used.

Poisoning – by veterinary drugs like diclofenac or other substances used against predators – is the biggest threat to vultures worldwide. Vultures are keystone species that play vital roles in maintaining ecosystem health. Their removal and depletion have a number of cascading negative ecological effects as well as adverse impacts on human health.

The precipitous decline in three vulture species on the Indian sub-continent over the last 20 years has resulted in a number of problems emerging due to the vultures no longer being able to fulfil their role of removing the carcasses of dead animals from the environment. A proliferation of feral dogs and a substantial increase in diseases such as rabies have been documented and can be linked directly to this decline.

http://raptorpolitics.org.uk/2015/0...-20-himalayan-griffon-vultures-dead-in-india/

The VCF and its partners have been working on anti-poisoning activities, campaigns and programmes in Europe. Please check the link below for more details.

http://www.4vultures.org/our-work/anti-poisoning/international-workshop-african-vultures-poisoning/

The diclofenac problem has been discussed at length on Bird Forum: its insidious effects haven't entirely been diminished by the ban in India, for much of it has now either disappeared on to the black market, or has been exported to countries where it is still in legal use. Some of the superseding veterinary drugs have also been implicated in similar, but as far as I know, not so extensive circumstances: VCF have been campaigning for a more coherent approach across countries with vulture populations. That's one issue.

The subject of farmers using poisons doesn't just relate to vultures, of course - many raptors are either targeted or become 'collateral damage'. However, it's important that this is treated as a separate issue so that amelioration measures, particularly in education, can be applied. I see value in mentioning both issues at the same time, as long as they are clearly distinguished.

The Indian press has done a reasonable job on this second issue, but so far I haven't found what the poison used in the Assam incidents was. Has anyone on Bird Forum found this out?

"The chemicals - especially pesticides that are used in agriculture - are sprayed on the dead cattle to kill dogs. But, unfortunately, vultures feed on the carcass that was poisoned, and die in large numbers. In this way, it causes vulture deaths" - telegraph India.
MJB
 

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