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AOU-NACC Proposals 2015 (1 Viewer)

Richard Klim

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Proposals 2015-C

checklist.aou.org/nacc/proposals/current_proposals.html
Proposals 2015-C (PDF)
  • 2015-C-1: Split Coiba Spinetail Cranioleuca dissita from Rusty-backed Spinetail C. vulpina
  • 2015-C-2: Change the specific epithet of the Kauai Amakihi from kauaiensis to stejnegeri
  • 2015-C-3: Add Common Redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) to main list
  • 2015-C-4: Add Zino's Petrel (Pterodroma madeira) to the main list
  • 2015-C-5: Add Egyptian Goose (Alopochen aegyptiaca) to the main list as an established exotic species
  • 2015-C-6: Add Demoiselle Crane (Anthropoides virgo) to the Appendix
  • 2015-C-7: Add Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) to the Appendix
  • 2015-C-8: Change the English name of Anthus rubescens from American Pipit to Buff-bellied Pipit
  • 2015-C-9: Split Northern Harrier Circus hudsonius from Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus
  • 2015-C-10: Revise generic boundaries in the Buteo group (SACC # 460)
 
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Richard Klim

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ABA Checklist: Exotics

  • 2015-C-5: Add Egyptian Goose (Alopochen aegyptiaca) to the main list as an established exotic species
Carlos Sanchez, 10,000 Birds, 10 Apr 2015: What's the Next ABA-Countable Exotic?

[Incidentally, FOSRC (2012) acknowledges that the small FL populations of Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus and Spot-breasted Oriole Icterus pectoralis may never have met the current criteria for recognition as established exotics. But, in keeping with FL's relatively exotic-friendly approach (compared with CA's more conservative policy), it was nevertheless decided that they would not be retrospectively de-listed unless/until extirpated. The ABA Area Status E (Exotic) listing, which mostly respects state-level decisions, is consequently rather inconsistent.]
 
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Richard Klim

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Proposal 2015-C10a

Why 'hypothetical'??
Listed by IOC as Geranoaetus polyosoma and dating from 1824, with poecilochrous (1879) as a subspecies of it, not the other way round.
AOU 1998 (Check-list, 7th ed)...
APPENDIX​
Part 1. Species reported from the A.O.U. Check-list area with insufficient evidence for placement on the main list.

Buteo polyosoma (Quoy and Gaimard). Red-backed Hawk.
Falco polyosoma Quoy and Gaimard, 1824, in Freycinet, Voy. Uranie Phys., Zool., 3: 92, pl. 14. (Falkland Islands.)​
An individual thought to be of this Andean and southern South American species was reported from Colorado (Gunnison, first from mid-August-31 October 1987, photographs; 1988, Amer. Birds 42: 112); the bird returned the next year and was paired with a B. swainsoni. Identification as another South American species, B. poecilochrous Gurney, 1879, cannot be ruled out; furthermore, the origin of the bird remains highly questionable (Allen 1988).
Yes, the wording of the proposal title is misleading (unintentionally suggesting that poecilochrous has priority). See also: Puna Hawk.
 
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mb1848

Well-known member
Re: Wisonia. "Note from Chair: Normand David and Michel Gosselin, advisors to the committee,
have reviewed this proposal and fully agree with the author’s conclusions." Nuff said!
 

Richard Klim

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56th Supplement

Chesser, Banks, Burns, Cicero, Dunn, Kratter, Lovette, Navarro-Sigüenza, Rasmussen, Remsen, Rising, Stotz & Winker 2015. Fifty-sixth Supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union: Check-list of North American Birds. Auk 132(3): 748–764. [pdf]

Species splits...
... (2) 11 species (Pterodroma heraldica, Puffinus newelli, Phaethornis mexicanus, Calliphlox lyrura, Himatione fraithii, Hemignathus hanapepe, H. affinis, Akialoa stejnegeri, A. lanaiensis, Loxops wolstenholmei, and L. ochraceus) are added to the main list due to splits from species already on the list; (3) one species name is changed (to Cranioleuca dissita) because of a split from an extralimital species; (4) the distributional statement of one species (Stercorarius skua) is changed because of a split from an extralimital species; ...
Proposals that did not pass...
Proposals considered but not accepted by the committee included separation of Northern Harrier Circus hudsonius from Hen Harrier C. cyaneus, separation of Toxostoma arenicola from LeConte's Thrasher T. lecontei, separation of Passerina pallidior from Painted Bunting P. ciris, separation of Northern Cardinal Cardinalis cardinalis into six species, transfer of Loxops mana to Manucerthia, change of the English name of American Pipit Anthus rubescens to Buff-bellied Pipit, and the universal adoption of American spellings of words in bird names for which British and American spellings differ.
 
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njlarsen

Gallery Moderator
Opus Editor
Supporter
Barbados
I will be curious to see the discussion of a couple of these, especially the N Harrier decision.

Niels
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Chesser, Banks, Burns, Cicero, Dunn, Kratter, Lovette, Navarro-Sigüenza, Rasmussen, Remsen, Rising, Stotz & Winker 2015. Fifty-sixth Supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union: Check-list of North American Birds. Auk 132(3): 748–764. [pdf]
Appendix
Anthropoides virgo ( Linnaeus). Demoiselle Crane.
... On the other hand, the species is highly migratory and has occurred as a stray throughout western Europe, north to the Orkney Islands and Scandinavia
:eek!::eek!::eek!:
 

Richard Klim

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Demoiselle Crane

Appendix
Anthropoides virgo (Linnaeus). Demoiselle Crane.
... On the other hand, the species is highly migratory and has occurred as a stray throughout western Europe, north to the Orkney Islands and Scandinavia
:eek!::eek!::eek!:
Oops. Perhaps Dunn & Gibson (Proposal 2015-C-6) confused the British records of Sandhill Crane – which has occurred as a stray to Orkney (and further north to Shetland).
 
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Richard Klim

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mb1848

Well-known member
"occurred as a stray throughout western Europe, north to the Orkney Islands "
14th May 1863 Deerness.
 

Richard Klim

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Demoiselle Crane

I am not sure why it is not on the British List; maybe the specimen was lost?
It would be interesting to know the full history relating to this record. Demoiselle Crane isn't even included in Category D (Species that would otherwise appear in Category A except that there is reasonable doubt that they have ever occurred in a natural state).
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Checked in my copy of The Birds of Orkney (Booth et al., which I'd forgot I had!), they are listed there as escapes.
 

jmorlan

Hmmm. That's funny
Opus Editor
United States
Despite the newly recognized close relationship of the American Tree Sparrow to the Fox Sparrow/Junco group, it does not seem to have moved there. Instead, if I read it correctly, it remains in its old position at the beginning of the Spizella. Am I missing something?
 

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