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AOU-NACC Proposals 2019 (1 Viewer)

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
It's an English language checklist that sets the common names for english language usage. The NACC doesn't have secret police that are going to show up in Germany and make you speak English.
 

James Jobling

Well-known member
Fred, I think "Mysticete" must have forgotten his geography lessons, "Flags of the World," etc, when he wrote "in Germany" instead of "in The Netherlands."
 

Fred Ruhe

Well-known member
Netherlands
It's an English language checklist that sets the common names for english language usage. The NACC doesn't have secret police that are going to show up in Germany and make you speak English.

I am not complaining about an English chechlust, they must know for themselves. But I just don't want your "english problems" discussed on an international forum, not once, but at least twice a year, with no arguments that make any sence and remarks that sometimes are even insulting.

If English speaking people want to discuss their problems with English bird names let them go to a language forum or ask a moderator for a seperate forum, it has nothing to do with taxonomy or nomenclature. Please don't waste my time. Lets discuss birds an bird taxonomy and evolution, and if you want to, bird name etymology, subjects of interest.

Fred, I think "Mysticete" must have forgotten his geography lessons, "Flags of the World," etc, when he wrote "in Germany" instead of "in The Netherlands."

Yes I agree, I am a proud subject of His Royal Highness King Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand, Koning der Nederlanden, Prins van Oranje-Nassau, Jonkheer van Amsberg etc, etc., also known as Prins Pils (Prince Lagerbeer).

Fred
 
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Jos Stratford

Beast from the East
But I just don't want your "english problems" discussed on an international forum.

If English speaking people want to discuss their problems with English bird names let them go to a language forum or ask a moderator for a seperate forum, it has nothing to do with taxonomy or nomenclature. Please don't waste my time. Lets discuss birds an bird taxonomy and evolution, and if you want to, bird name etymology, subjects of interest.

Nobody is wasting your time, only you do that by reading and engaging in a subject that doesn't interest you - if you don't want to read this thread, simply don't read it.

As for your suggestion that other posters don't use Birdforum to discuss English bird names here, bad luck - this is the correct place to do so. Maybe you have different ideas what nomenclature is, but most folk understand it as the system for naming things, especially in a particular area of science, ie exactly what is being discussed.
 

Jos Stratford

Beast from the East
Yes I agree, I am a proud subject of His Royal Highness King Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand, Koning der Nederlanden, Prins van Oranje-Nassau, Jonkheer van Amsberg etc, etc., also known as Prins Pils (Prince Lagerbeer).

What were you saying about using this forum only for taxonomy and evolution? :)
 

Peter Kovalik

Well-known member
Slovakia
R Terry Chesser, Shawn M Billerman, Kevin J Burns, Carla Cicero, Jon L Dunn, Andrew W Kratter, Irby J Lovette, Nicholas A Mason, Pamela C Rasmussen, J V Remsen, Jr, Douglas F Stotz, Kevin Winker, Addendum to the Sixty-first Supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American Birds, The Auk, , ukaa074, https://doi.org/10.1093/ornithology/ukaa074

This notice adds one new entry (#1 below) to the 61st Supplement to the Check-list of North American Birds (The Auk: Ornithological Advances 137:1–24; https://doi.org/10.1093/auk/ukaa030) and corrects errors in two entries (#2–3 below):

  1. [p. 626] Change the English name of Rhynchophanes mccownii to Thick-billed Longspur, after the relatively stout, conical bill referred to in the genus name, and make the associated change on p. li to the English name in the list of species known from the A.O.S. area (pp. xvii–liv). The English name was changed in light of heightened awareness of racial issues and the widespread retirement of Confederate symbols. Although this species was described in 1851 and was not named in recognition of McCown’s military career, McCown nevertheless played an important leadership role in the Confederacy. This change was made in accordance with the committee’s new Guidelines for English Bird Names (https://americanornithology.org/nacc/guidelines-for-english-bird-names/).
Other possible replacement names were rejected as indicative only of particular plumages (e.g., Black-breasted Longspur) or as not distinctive with respect to other species of longspur (e.g., Bay-winged Longspur, White-tailed Longspur). Habitat names such as Shortgrass Longspur were strongly considered but rejected as misleading due to this species’ occurrence in barren habitats during most of the year (winter and migration), when the other three species of longspur are found in shortgrass.

Replace the existing Notes with the following:

Notes.—Formerly known as McCown’s Longspur.

  1. Under Entry 7 of the supplement, concerning the addition of Coccyzus melacoryphus to the U.S. list, correct the name of the town in southern Texas from Weslac to Weslaco.
  2. Under Entry 32 of the supplement, concerning the merger of Corvus caurinus and C. brachyrhynchos, correct the first sentence to read as follows:
  3. Corvus caurinus is treated as conspecific with Corvus brachyrhynchos, following Slager et al. (2020), and is now considered a subspecies of brachyrhynchos.”
Replace the existing Notes with the following:

Notes.—Formerly (e.g., AOU 1983, 1998) treated as two species C. brachyrhynchos and C. caurinus Baird, 1858 [Northwestern Crow], but merged based on genomic data that indicate a lack of reproductive isolation with extensive introgression and backcrossing (Slager et al. 2020), clinal variation, and a lack of consistent differences in size, ecology, and vocalizations where the two are in contact in southwestern British Columbia and northwestern Washington (Rhoads 1893, Johnston 1961, Slager et al. 2020). Also known as Common Crow.
 

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