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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Are these edible? (1 Viewer)

Reader

Well-known member
My neighbour alerted me to some mushrooms that have suddenly appeared at the side of their house. We have never seen them grow there before (and I have lived here for sixteen years). I have attached a couple of photos of the mushrooms plus a photo of where they are growing (you can just see the white mushrooms close to the wall).

They look like those mushrooms that you buy in the supermarkets but that doesn't mean that they are the same.

What do the experts think?

I forgot to add that I live in Coventry.
 

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Davebutterflyman

Well-known member
They are an Agaricus of some type, and whilst some are edible, identification within this group is difficult so i would advise against consuming any.
 

Reader

Well-known member
Thanks for coming back to me. I thought there might be a problem so we will leave them alone.

One question. I have lived here for sixteen years, my neighbour for over thirty yeas and at no time have these mushrooms ever grown here. What would have started them off like that as we haven't changed anything in that area.
 
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Julie50

Mostly in the Midlands :)
United Kingdom
Hi

It is my understanding that with this type of fungi the “mushroom” is the fruiting body on the end of mycelium which look like thin white threads and are under the ground. They are the ones that produce “fairy rings”. They thrive best with rotting wood and high nitrogen (e.g. horse manure). It may be that there have been some nearby spreading your way, or perhaps parts of the tree in the picture are rotting?

I am however no field expert, just a science teacher, so someone with more expertise may say I am wrong!

Julie
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
Perhaps spent mushroom compost has been put on those borders and a few spores survived?

Nothing tastier than wild Field Mushrooms in Autumn.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
" Pavement mushroom, the tastiest". Think I'll pass if growing in an urban environment ( vehicle exhaust fumes, dog latrine and heaven knows what else ).
 

Reader

Well-known member
Nothing has been put there for years. That's what makes it a surprise that they have suddenly turned up.

Perhaps spent mushroom compost has been put on those borders and a few spores survived?

Nothing tastier than wild Field Mushrooms in Autumn.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
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