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Autumnwatch 2012 (1 Viewer)

Himalaya

Well-known member
Changes.......



http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/natureuk/2012/10/all-new-autumnwatch-2012---liv.shtml



We're delighted to announce that Autumnwatch returns at the end of October with an exciting new format and location, planned to capture all the best wildlife action of autumn. As if that's not enough cause for celebration, Autumnwatch will be followed by the brand new live series, Winterwatch, in January.

Chris Packham, Michaela Strachan, Martin Hughes-Games and guests will be following all the wildlife stories as they happen, broadcasting live from our new location. And for the first time, Autumnwatch will be based in Scotland, at one of the best places to showcase the beauty and drama of this dynamic and diverse season. There'll be 4 live shows on BBC TWO from Tuesday 30th October until Friday 2nd November, with Autumnwatch Unsprung on Friday, and our live cameras will be on BBC Red Button and the Web around the clock.

Our New Location
So what about Autumnwatch's new location? We'll be based at the Aigas Field Centre, in the beautiful Scottish Highlands. It's one of the finest areas in the country to experience autumn wildlife, and we'll be right at the heart of the action. Nestled in a wooded glen and surrounded by dramatic mountains, Aigas is home to some of the UK's most iconic animals, from highland specialists to familiar garden wildlife. In the forest, there are red squirrels, pine martens, red deer and crested tits. Birds of prey cruise over the moorland, while foxes and small mammals hunt in the undergrowth, and a loch is home to a family of beavers. We can't wait to show you!

The cameras are being prepared as we speak and with many mammals only active at night, our team will have infra-red, thermal and live mini-cameras to provide a unique insight into their rarely-glimpsed nocturnal lives. The latest macro camera technology will reveal the fascinating, hidden worlds of tiny creatures that normally go unnoticed - we'll truly have autumn covered from the canopy to the leaf litter.

Of course, the wildlife always writes the script, and we've learnt to expect the unexpected on Autumnwatch! But we're hoping to bring you the following:-

• Beavers - for the first time in the UK, Autumnwatch aims to show exclusive, intimate views from a live camera inside a beaver's lodge as they prepare for winter.
• Pine martens - these secretive and little known creatures are notoriously elusive but Autumnwatch will have a privileged opportunity to see them up close.
• Mammal stump - back by popular demand: the mammal stump is a hollowed out tree trunk with embedded cameras and offers a unique perspective on the dramatic lives of small mammals.
• Buzzards, red squirrels and foxes. In autumn all these species employ different feeding strategies as they prepare for winter. Scavenging, hoarding or stealing - we'll be following their every move.

Live Online and on BBC Red Button
This year, there's more opportunity than ever to watch the action. The remote wildlife cameras switch on on Sunday 28th October, before the series airs on TV.

We now have an Olympic line up of platforms to watch the cameras on - BBC Red Button, the Web, iPads, iPhones, android phones and tablets. So now you can stay tuned to the action, where ever you are.

We're also excited to announce that this year, for 17 hours a day, we'll have live commentary on the live cameras from wildlife experts and broadcasters Chris Sperring and Euan McIlwraith. (Between midnight and 7am the cameras will still be live, with text commentary - apparently presenters need to sleep.)

As always, there are plenty of ways for all of you to get involved.
Post a Reply to a blog like this one
Join us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter or share your autumn experiences with #autumnwatch

Share photos via the official Autumnwatch Flickr group

To find autumnal events near where you live, Try BBC Things to Do.

The Autumnwatch team will be checking all these regularly and we're looking forward to seeing your pictures, receiving your questions, and finding out about your own experiences of autumn.

So that's the big news about the new series, and the new location. But that's just the start - from our base in Scotland we'll be following autumn across the UK, and the team are already out and about filming. The autumnal highlights include an in-depth wild diary, showcasing the beauty of the UK's most iconic landscapes, and revealing the new science and behaviour of some of our best loved animals. We'll be posting more news about all of this soon. Also, look out for a blog from our very own Martin Hughes-Games, who'll be talking about how everyone can get involved in Autumnwatch Unsprung.

And if that wasn't enough, after Autumnwatch, we'll be telling you all about our brand new series, Winterwatch - live for 4 days in January.

We hope you are all as excited about the new look Autumnwatch and Winterwatch as we are!
 

Euan Buchan

The Edinburgh Birdwatcher
Supporter
Scotland
Looking forward to it but saddened it's not on for longer then it once was It used to be on for 3 weeks.
 

Himalaya

Well-known member
Springwatch was on for 3 weeks, Autumnwatch was on for 8 weeks. There are no programmes lost but they will be shown in a week rather than spread out and then half of it shown during winter.

Looks like a cost cutting initiative? They wont be visiting as many places. Change is good but the way it was spread out over 8 weeks was a fantastic idea. i think it should be spread out over 4 weeks and then the remainining 4 spread out over january.
 

bongofury

Well-known member
Previous series have given a good amount of time to migration, but it doesn't look the case this year. I fear for the mention of red deer; I hope I don't get to repeatedly hear the "r" word.

I can't say I'm taken by the announcement, but I'll wait and see. On a positive point they have kept Michaela.
 

Himalaya

Well-known member
I do not mind them doing a few episodes in winter but spread out is better. One thing I do not like about Springwatch is the fact that they have 4 in a week so it can become hard to keep up with. The spread of Autumnwatch was superb. You could end up on a warm long sunny day and end with a a snow filled landscape. Also with in that time span they visited many different areas. I wish they start a weekly episode of Springwatch in late March and show us how Spring develops.
 

Robin Edwards

Well-known member
wouldn't it be good if the programme gave a small amount of air-time to highlight the realities of the persection and species removal that hampers wildlife in the Highlands and elsewhere in Britain.

I know these programmes are aimed to appeal to the masses but it would be helpful if viewers in general recognised what we on BF knows goes on.
 

Green Sandpiper

Well-known member
Scotland
I think badgers need the PR among the masses at the moment, so if Autumnwatch can highlight even subtly how wonderful they are, then more power to them.

I agree it would be better spread over a few weeks to showcase the season better. They're also gambling that enough happens to maintain the programme.
 

Gill Osborne

Well-known member
Michaela delighting in the "beaver action" - egad!

I burst out laughing when she made that comment and IMMEDIATELY thought '''Oh I'll bet someone on BF picks up on that!'' :-O Martin & Chris were very professional and didn't so much as even smirk :king: *or is it just me and John's childish smutty humour?* ;)

Very enjoyable hour and sorry guys.....I LOVE THE RED DEER o:) Looking forward to tomorrow's programme :t:

Have to agree that it WAS a lot more enjoyable when it was spread out over 8 weeks so we could actually see the changes taking place. But hey....any wildlife is good wildlife to me :t:
 

Boy George

Well-known member
What were they doing almost eulogising the Grey Squirrel and no mention of the Squirrel Pox Virus? And, from of all places, one of the last bastions of our native Reds almost wiped out by the introduced Grey!
 

keith

Well-known member
What were they doing almost eulogising the Grey Squirrel and no mention of the Squirrel Pox Virus? And, from of all places, one of the last bastions of our native Reds almost wiped out by the introduced Grey!

The thought occured to me also.
 

JTweedie

Well-known member
Good programme tonight, I particularly liked the wildcats, even if they were captive.

Can't believe the good views that Iolo Williams has been getting of the golden eagles. We all know of the joke about tourist eagles sitting on fence posts, but what did we see in the footage tonight? :)

One minor quibble - they held up a drawn map of Aigas, and I'm sure they had a drawing of a nuthatch on a feeder. It's not beyond the realms of possibility, but it seems unlikely that they'd get one of them there - I mean they only seem to just be colonising the area around Glasgow now.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Good programme tonight, I particularly liked the wildcats, even if they were captive.

Can't believe the good views that Iolo Williams has been getting of the golden eagles. We all know of the joke about tourist eagles sitting on fence posts, but what did we see in the footage tonight? :)

One minor quibble - they held up a drawn map of Aigas, and I'm sure they had a drawing of a nuthatch on a feeder. It's not beyond the realms of possibility, but it seems unlikely that they'd get one of them there - I mean they only seem to just be colonising the area around Glasgow now.

Those cats looked quite decent. Big thick tails, no spotting - though the leg stripes could have been better - and a magnificent head on the male. Just a suspicion on the kitten that the back stripe continued onto the tail.

John
 

Robert Wallace

Well-known member
Chris is not like the Pope infallible. I can cope with the odd mistake and on balance the present team is going from strength to strength.
Should show where the Aigas Centre is geographically, rather than to say near Inverness.
Interesting that if we include Iolo in the team, all "Alpha" brands of binoculars represented. This says to me that a lot of time and effort is wasted on another BF section discussing the "best" binocular and that all the mainstream brands are fit for purpose.
 

Euan Buchan

The Edinburgh Birdwatcher
Supporter
Scotland
Enjoyed the Golden Eagle films in North Uist particularly since I know North Uist very well and seen many there too and the wildcat film too.
 
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