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Azuero Peninsula (1 Viewer)

njlarsen

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Barbados
Hello all,
does anyone have any recent information about birding in the Azuero Peninsula of Panama? Any good locations that does not involve going on a three day expedition?
Niels
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
Not recent and not been there. However, on the western side there's that relatively accessible estancia where you can see the parakeet. I found material about that some where on web (sorry not more concrete). My understanding is you basically have to do the hike to see the hummer (is it really a separate species..?)

Despite appearances, my understanding is the parakeet isn't very divergent from congeners: I think I reluctantly agreed it should be lumped
 

njlarsen

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Thanks Fern,
I found a hotspot on ebird that seems to be that Finca, and thereafter the company that arranges trips out there (as well as the B&B associated with them). It seems Brown-backed/Azuero Dove is more certain than the parakeet, and as you say, the local Mountain-gem (which I have not heard proposed as a species elsewhere) does need the climb. Most likely, the macaw is the same thing. There might still be a few other species I still lack that can make it worth-while. I will look at prices and see what I think.
Niels
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
Thanks Fern,
I found a hotspot on ebird that seems to be that Finca, and thereafter the company that arranges trips out there (as well as the B&B associated with them). It seems Brown-backed/Azuero Dove is more certain than the parakeet, and as you say, the local Mountain-gem (which I have not heard proposed as a species elsewhere) does need the climb. Most likely, the macaw is the same thing. There might still be a few other species I still lack that can make it worth-while. I will look at prices and see what I think.
Niels
No it's not a mountain gem, it's glow-thoated hummingbird. That place (reserve) is the only one with "reliable" recent reports. From the east I think it's a day (something like 9hrs by boat and walking); it may be possible from the West, the finca. But either way the dove would be nice...

Afaicr, July is peak parakeet time at finca and so a good time to go. Didn't Josh go there (search birds of passage blog). Presume "macaw" is scarlet or great green. Both are easier in other places. You might pm Josh

The other thing to search for at this time of year is the umbrellabird. If you check ebird map you'll find the area of Central PA where it occurs. This would be one to get local knowledge about: get impression it's much reduced in frequency in recent times. Perhaps contact Euclidean Campos or similar...

Edit: yes there is an endemic mountain gem ssp I think but glow-thoated's the main attraction
 
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pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
I’ve not been since 2013. I did go to the finca for the Parakeets, they’re seasonal I believe there. Going up Cerro Hoya can get you the new Mountain-Gem and maybe Glow-throated Hummingbird.

Mountain-Gem taxonomy is controversial but it is certainly a distinctive bird, just arguable if it is a species or if there should be a couple of big Lampornis lumps.

There is no doubt that Glow-throated is a good species. The idea that it might not be is, in my experience, based upon internet opinions from people without experience with the taxon (most of us, honestly!). At one point a fairly big/known voice in neotropical birding was widely suggesting it wasn’t a species. I thought that was a bold statement so I asked George Angehr (RIP) about it and he had no doubt about the validity of Glow-throated as a species and sent me photos of museum series. I am happy to repost them here later when home, but I was left with no doubt about species status.

However, from what I know, the last few people who have gone up Cerro Hoya have dipped Glow-throated also :(

A great place to start getting up to date info would be from Kees and Loes at Heliconia Inn, who are also a good choice to organize a trip (highly recommended, also great snorkeling and just beautiful) to Coiba for the Spinetail and Dove.
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
new Mountain-Gem
Has it been proposed / accepted anywhere? Knew it was a distinctive form, but unaware there was a formal split proposal I think.

Last ebird for glow-throated was 2019 and, since it was a female/immature (and these things are quite difficult to ID iirc—depends on good view of male throat or tail feathers: ebird = "Female Scintillant is very similar and may not be separable in the field"), I'd be sceptical that it was definitely this unless we can be absolutely sure things like scintillant can be ruled out. A quick look suggests Scintillant isn't there, but so few people go there, who knows?

Coiba better.
 

njlarsen

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Thanks, I did notice Glow-throated but again necessitating the climb. It will be august before I am there so what is around may be difficult to know (ebird has very little data).
Regarding the Mountain-gem, these web descriptions of the area is the first time I noticed the form.
Niels
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
Just for what it is worth Glow-throated Hummingbird has got to be one of the 5 or so most difficult birds to see in North America (including the Caribbean!)
 

njlarsen

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Barbados
You've probably already found, but a search for "Azuero parakeet july" yielded this, confirming my memory:

http://panama-wildlife.blogspot.com/2015/07/azueros-painted-parakeet.

I'm unclear why it cost so much... ...Also if you've not found josh's yet:

Coiba Island and the Azuero Peninsula

We have not really discussed the macaws here...
Thanks Fern,
I had found Josh but not the second link you gave. I also found this
where it states $75 per person (min 2) for the 1 day visit to the farm, which includes guide and lunch and hopefully some money to the owner so that he gets something for keeping it up.

The Macaws there are the Great Green. They seem to be a species where observations are hidden in ebird, so the only thing that is for sure is that they occur in the region.

According to Josh it might be possible to bypass the guiding from Tanager/Heliconia but I am not sure my Spanish is good enough for that.
Niels
 

THE_FERN

Well-known member
The Macaws there are the Great Green.
Can't remember where a good place is to see great green in that part of Panama. Perhaps you can get more info from observation.org. I think I have the impression they're easier on the north coast (and obviously Darien). If that's right could try for pygmy sloth and escudo (rufous-tailed) hummer too.
 

njlarsen

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Can't remember where a good place is to see great green in that part of Panama. Perhaps you can get more info from observation.org. I think I have the impression they're easier on the north coast (and obviously Darien). If that's right could try for pygmy sloth and escudo (rufous-tailed) hummer too.
Seems that Observation has also blurred the location. Given the danger of this becoming a target of the pet trade, I cannot blame them. Costa Rica seems to be a more high volume location for this species by now.
Niels
 

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