• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Baby bird ruptured air sac (3 Viewers)

Scp13

New member
United States
Hello all, I have a question. Yesterday I found an abandoned baby Blue Jay far from the nest and surrounded by cats. I took it in and checked it out, all seemed good, no visible wounds. I fed it small pieces of softened dog food through the rest of the day and noticed it slept a ton and was not super active and was having trouble standing (it had a decent amount of feathers growing in so I assume it was about old enough to leave the nest). Slept great through the night and ate fine. I worked with it on standing some and it was standing and chirping pretty well in the morning, however I noticed it flap its wings wildly and then fell over. Its head went limp and it started looking up and sideways. I knew something was off so I looked it over and saw a large air bubble forming under the skin by its left leg. I have chickens and I am slightly familiar with this, so I proceeded to puncture the skin with a sterile needle and massage the air out. The bird began to move again and fixed its head and chirped, but then started gaping its mouth and moving its tongue in and out. My first thought was “It can’t breathe!” But I had no idea where to go from there and within the minute the poor baby passed. My question is, what did I do wrong or could have done differently to save it? Also, what did the gaping mean? I have read that a ruptured air sac is not fatal, however I don’t know how serious it is for a baby bird.
Sorry for the long story, and thank you in advance for any help on my situation.
 
Hi Scp and a warm welcome to you from all the Staff and Moderators. We have some general guidelines here for the care of injured and baby birds. I hope you find this helpful.

Most vets will give emergency treatment for free to a native wild animal, but not on-going treatment. so it's really important to find a wildlife rehabber who will be licensed to care for them. The vet would most likely have a list.

Thank you for trying to rescue this wee one, and I'm sorry it didn't work out.
 
Welcome to Birdforum.

These guidelines may help.

 
Hello all, I have a question. Yesterday I found an abandoned baby Blue Jay far from the nest and surrounded by cats. I took it in and checked it out, all seemed good, no visible wounds. I fed it small pieces of softened dog food through the rest of the day and noticed it slept a ton and was not super active and was having trouble standing (it had a decent amount of feathers growing in so I assume it was about old enough to leave the nest). Slept great through the night and ate fine. I worked with it on standing some and it was standing and chirping pretty well in the morning, however I noticed it flap its wings wildly and then fell over. Its head went limp and it started looking up and sideways. I knew something was off so I looked it over and saw a large air bubble forming under the skin by its left leg. I have chickens and I am slightly familiar with this, so I proceeded to puncture the skin with a sterile needle and massage the air out. The bird began to move again and fixed its head and chirped, but then started gaping its mouth and moving its tongue in and out. My first thought was “It can’t breathe!” But I had no idea where to go from there and within the minute the poor baby passed. My question is, what did I do wrong or could have done differently to save it? Also, what did the gaping mean? I have read that a ruptured air sac is not fatal, however I don’t know how serious it is for a baby bird.
Sorry for the long story, and thank you in advance for any help on my situation.
Birds have a totally different respiratory layout and system than other animals. A punctured air sac is a punctured breathing system. A chick with a punctured sac has a very slim chance of survival. Check the YouTube link

Per
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top