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Backpack for scope and tripod (1 Viewer)

pyrrhula

Member
Austria
I'm looking for a backpack to carry my scope and also my tripod as well as my binoculars (as well as a few smaller things like field guide, water bottle etc.). I'm willing to spend around 100€.

I have checked out the Lowepro Flipside 400 AW II at a local store already and it would fit scope and binoculars nicely but my tripod seems to be too large (67cm). It's not that I want the tripod to fit inside the backpack but I think when attached to the side of the backpack the tripod still shouldn't stick out too much over the top. I'm worried that if so balance will be off. But this is what would probably happen with the Flipside 400 AW II.

Something like the Lowepro Scope Porter 200 AW or the Lowepro Scope Travel 200 AW would probably be best but for some reason I can't find any of them available anywhere, they seem to be discontinued...

Do you have any suggestions for a good backpack with an option to attach larger tripods like mine that is over all similar in size to the Flipside AW II? Also I'm open to any other suggestions reagarding transport of equipment. What do you use?

Best regards!
 

forent

Well-known member
Always in search for the perfect solution I have tried, tested (and of course owned) quite a few photo backpacks over the years, among them different models from LowePro, Thinktank Photo, Vanguard, Tamrac, Rowi, hama, no-names. I wanted to carry my 82mm scope, an equivalent tripod, a DSLR with 400/5.6 lens, a 8x42 binocular and the usual bits and peaces.

In the long run nothing worked for me: too bulky (usually too much padding!) and/or too inconvenient and/or too slow etc - you name it. Hence, I have done away with all those special photo/optic backpacks.

Today I have replaced the DSLR with a superzoom bridge, the 3-section with a 4-section tripod and use a standard top-load 40 liter trekking backpack. Everything incl. the tripod fits in and the carrying comfort is satisfying. Depending on the situation the scope and the camera are wrapped either in ordinary cotton towels or their own small and handy bags. Up to now the most practical solution for me.
 

wllmspd

Well-known member
I recently swapped to a smaller/lighter 60mm scope and a deliberately short lighter weight tripod, so they both fit in the backpacks I already own easily with some binoculars. It’s a lot easier and less tiring to carry for long periods too. I’ve left the bird guide at home too.. 700g! (I use a phone app).
I’d go to an outdoor shop with a tape measure and see how you get on, leaving space for some cut up foam camping mat to protect your stuff.

Peter

PS I have a Lowe alpine Airlzone hike 30, especially tall inside with good straps and a waist strap, makes carrying heavy stuff more pleasant. A relative bought it for us a while back, turns out it’s ideal for carrying my big scope that otherwise I couldn’t carry.
 
Last edited:

BKoh

Well-known member
Singapore
I'm looking for a backpack to carry my scope and also my tripod as well as my binoculars (as well as a few smaller things like field guide, water bottle etc.). I'm willing to spend around 100€.
...
Do you have any suggestions for a good backpack with an option to attach larger tripods like mine that is over all similar in size to the Flipside AW II? Also I'm open to any other suggestions reagarding transport of equipment. What do you use?

Best regards!
Consider the mulepac or scopepac, both are designed to carry tripods fully deployed with scopes mounted. However they may not have space for much else, so you may still need a chest pouch or similar for binos and water.
 

pyrrhula

Member
Austria
Always in search for the perfect solution I have tried, tested (and of course owned) quite a few photo backpacks over the years, among them different models from LowePro, Thinktank Photo, Vanguard, Tamrac, Rowi, hama, no-names. I wanted to carry my 82mm scope, an equivalent tripod, a DSLR with 400/5.6 lens, a 8x42 binocular and the usual bits and peaces.

In the long run nothing worked for me: too bulky (usually too much padding!) and/or too inconvenient and/or too slow etc - you name it. Hence, I have done away with all those special photo/optic backpacks.

Today I have replaced the DSLR with a superzoom bridge, the 3-section with a 4-section tripod and use a standard top-load 40 liter trekking backpack. Everything incl. the tripod fits in and the carrying comfort is satisfying. Depending on the situation the scope and the camera are wrapped either in ordinary cotton towels or their own small and handy bags. Up to now the most practical solution for me.

I recently swapped to a smaller/lighter 60mm scope and a deliberately short lighter weight tripod, so they both fit in the backpacks I already own easily with some binoculars. It’s a lot easier and less tiring to carry for long periods too. I’ve left the bird guide at home too.. 700g! (I use a phone app).
I’d go to an outdoor shop with a tape measure and see how you get on, leaving space for some cut up foam camping mat to protect your stuff.

Peter

PS I have a Lowe alpine Airlzone hike 30, especially tall inside with good straps and a waist strap, makes carrying heavy stuff more pleasant. A relative bought it for us a while back, turns out it’s ideal for carrying my big scope that otherwise I couldn’t carry.

Thanks for your replies!

So the best solution for both of you seems to be just using a regular trekking backpack and wrapping your equipment. I'll keep this idea in mind.

Best regards!
 

pyrrhula

Member
Austria
Consider the mulepac or scopepac, both are designed to carry tripods fully deployed with scopes mounted. However they may not have space for much else, so you may still need a chest pouch or similar for binos and water.

Thanks for the suggestion!

I've come across a few of these backpacks while researching. However, as you said they all seem to be very small and not very useful for travelling itself but only if you are out in the field birding...

Best regards!
 

BKoh

Well-known member
Singapore
Thanks for the suggestion!

I've come across a few of these backpacks while researching. However, as you said they all seem to be very small and not very useful for travelling itself but only if you are out in the field birding...

Best regards!
For actual travel / transport I use a 50L Tatonka hiking/trekking backpack. 80mm scope and 4-section tripod plus water bottle fit in the main compartment, secondary compartment fits binos, extra eyepieces, snacks etc. Outside compartment - insect repellent.

However I find it all quite heavy for a full day birding hike. Given what I know now I might have gone for a 65mm scope and carbon fibre tripod, would probably save 2kg in weight. Right now I mainly carry the backpack when cycling to my birding sites, then I deploy the scope and carry it that way. For a long hike I may skip the scope and stick to binos.
 

wllmspd

Well-known member
I saved a few kg on the tripod (now fits in the bag), scope another kg or more, eyepieces kg+ (only a zoom, even though I prefer wide fixed ones), leave the book behind (kg)… All adds up to make things more pleasant, though you do lose a bit of brightness/reach.

Peter
 

jring

Well-known member
Thanks for the suggestion!

I've come across a few of these backpacks while researching. However, as you said they all seem to be very small and not very useful for travelling itself but only if you are out in the field birding...

Best regards!

Hi,

yeah, mulepack et al are just for birding, but great at that as you have your scope ready very quickly and it's a lot more comfy in between than carrying tripod and scope in hand...

Some versions have a tiny backpack in there, mine is enough for a guide, some munchies and a bottle of water... bins go where they belong usually although I think I have crammed an 8x32 pair in there too...

Joachim
 

pyrrhula

Member
Austria
For actual travel / transport I use a 50L Tatonka hiking/trekking backpack. 80mm scope and 4-section tripod plus water bottle fit in the main compartment, secondary compartment fits binos, extra eyepieces, snacks etc. Outside compartment - insect repellent.

However I find it all quite heavy for a full day birding hike. Given what I know now I might have gone for a 65mm scope and carbon fibre tripod, would probably save 2kg in weight. Right now I mainly carry the backpack when cycling to my birding sites, then I deploy the scope and carry it that way. For a long hike I may skip the scope and stick to binos.

I see, it seems there's a clear preference for trekking backpacks here.

I have only owned my scope for about 2 months and have yet to accumulate some experience with transport. But what you're saying makes sense, thanks for sharing! Sadly my equipment is also quite heavy but I won't change it anytime soon since I only recently got it.

I saved a few kg on the tripod (now fits in the bag), scope another kg or more, eyepieces kg+ (only a zoom, even though I prefer wide fixed ones), leave the book behind (kg)… All adds up to make things more pleasant, though you do lose a bit of brightness/reach.

Peter

Thanks for sharing! As I said I won't change equipment anytime soon but I might consider leaving the book behind if I can adapt to an app.


Hi,

yeah, mulepack et al are just for birding, but great at that as you have your scope ready very quickly and it's a lot more comfy in between than carrying tripod and scope in hand...

Some versions have a tiny backpack in there, mine is enough for a guide, some munchies and a bottle of water... bins go where they belong usually although I think I have crammed an 8x32 pair in there too...

Joachim

Thanks for sharing, I might consider one in the future. Right now in the field I'm just shouldering my tripod with scope attached (binoculars always around the neck) and haven't had any major problems yet except for an occasionally aching shoulder. Maybe this will get worse but as I said my experience so far is very limited.

Best regards!
 

Swissboy

Sempach, Switzerland
Supporter
Switzerland
A possible option is the Viato scope backpack by Kite Optics.


It impressed me much, but then realized that it does not work well with a tripod that has 4-element legs. But with the longer 3-element versions of tripods it is quite an interesting thing.
 

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