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Banjicka Forest (1 Viewer)

Zheljko

Well-known member
Here is the list of birds present during the breeding season this year (2004) in Banjicka Forest in Belgrade.

Pheasant
Mallard
Sparrowhawk
Woodpigeon
Greater Spotted Woodpecker
Green Woodpecker
Blackcap
Blackbird
Robin
Nightingale
Wren
Great Tit
Jay
Black-billed Magpie
Hooded Crow

Species I haven't observed this year, but observed in years before during the breeding season:

Collared Dove (on a forest glade)
Tawny Owl (calling)
Sedge Warbler (in reeds by the stream)
Song Thrush
Redstart
Blue Tit
Marsh Tit
Long-tailed Tit
Wood Nuthatch
Short-toed Treecreeper
Chaffinch
 
Hi Zheljko,

What sort of forest is it?

I would guess, high altitude, if you have Dendrocopos major and not D. syriacus - but most of the other species suggest a lower altitude, broadleaf forest (Quercus/Carpinus/Tilia etc?).

Michael
 

Zheljko

Well-known member
Michael Frankis said:
Hi Zheljko,

What sort of forest is it?

I would guess, high altitude, if you have Dendrocopos major and not D. syriacus - but most of the other species suggest a lower altitude, broadleaf forest (Quercus/Carpinus/Tilia etc?).

Michael

The forest is at about 200 m above sea level. It is composed mostly of Pedunculate Oaks and various maples (some autochthonous and some imported American species, such as negundo). There are some other deciduous trees but they are individuals rather than stands.
The forest is not "open" but pretty thickly grown. Here syriacus mostly goes into more open woodlands such as orchards or some southern open forests. It commonly feeds on seeds from orchard trees such as southern-style Prunus (peach etc).
I recorded syriacus several times in the forest during winter (when it looks more "open", as it is deciduous), but once the breeding season starts, only D.major remains of all Dendrocopos (I think it actively displaces the other species).
Lesser Spotted is also common during winter, but it also does not breed.
I recorded a breeding pair of Middle Spotted in an orchard about 0.5 km south from the forest.
Of other woodpeckers, Green Woodpecker is almost as common as Greater Spotted (it goes both in orchards and the forest), and I only recorded Grey-headed once during autumn.
There are no Three-toed, Black or leucotos in the area - they really go only into mountains.
 
Hi Zheljko,

Thanks, interesting information - on thinking back, it matches what I found on my 2 trips to Bulgaria, though without thinking too clearly about it, except I didn't see D. major below about 300m altitude

Michael
 

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