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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Better Image In the SV (1 Viewer)

SuperDuty

Well-known member
What would it take to optically improve the SV to any significant degree ? I'm assuming if there were a cost effective way to do so we would have seen it in the new Field Pro.
 

cgr1971

Member
I also wish they would make a EL model without the field flatteners. I know that I could get a 1st gen EL, but I love the ergo's and the new improvements of the Field Pro.
 

jremmons

Wildlife Biologist
The newest model SV I tried, circa 2013, had less rolling ball (though still present, which is expected in flat-field binoculars), but still presented notably more CA than the pristine, CA free (or nearly so) image presented by either the Victory FL*T or Kowa Genesis. Until they correct that flaw, I would never own a pair.

I personally preferred the SLC WB/HD, but even that still showed more CA than I'd prefer seeing...
 

Hermann

Well-known member
What would it take to optically improve the SV to any significant degree ? I'm assuming if there were a cost effective way to do so we would have seen it in the new Field Pro.

The Field Pro isn't really an update at all. In fact, to me the new way to attach the strap looks more like a downgrade than anything else.

I also doubt there's any way one of the tops binoculars (from one of the three or four big manufacturers) can be optically improved "to a significant degree" anymore. Larger fields of view - perhaps, but that would mean higher weight as well. Slightly less CA - but that would mean quite significant changes as the internal focussing seems to be one of the problems causing an increase in CA. Better control of stray light - but then the Zeiss and the Leicas are pretty good already, as are some of the Swarovski models, albeit not all of them.

Hermann
 

SuperDuty

Well-known member
Which SV did you see ?

The newest model SV I tried, circa 2013, had less rolling ball (though still present, which is expected in flat-field binoculars), but still presented notably more CA than the pristine, CA free (or nearly so) image presented by either the Victory FL*T or Kowa Genesis. Until they correct that flaw, I would never own a pair.

I personally preferred the SLC WB/HD, but even that still showed more CA than I'd prefer seeing...
 

Vespobuteo

Well-known member
Without field flatteners it would not be Swarovision.

SO just put some vaseline on the front lenses
if you don't like the sharp edges.

But seriously, sharp edges are pretty useful
finding birds is easier,
and less active panning is needed,
best way to detect movement is holding your bins still.

Any RB I haven't noticed in SV:s.

But glare handling could be better.
 
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elkcub

Silicon Valley, California
United States
SLC is exactly that.

I fully agree with you, Sako, and others. Personally, I think Swarovski was nuts to 'simplify' and eliminate the 8x42 and 10x42 SLC-HDs, as they could have been retained as a birder/hunter's option and still marketed the current SLC line at a lower price. I hope they wake up and reissue them in the future. They provide images of equal quality to the SVs and don't mess up 3-D depth perception cues like the SVs. For me, the edges are as sharp as needs be for finding birds, the weight & balance is ideal, and the focusing range is enormously useful.

Ed
 
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james holdsworth

Consulting Biologist
But seriously, sharp edges are pretty useful
finding birds is easier,
and less active panning is needed,
best way to detect movement is holding your bins still.


Your method of birding is the complete opposite of mine - I pan all the time. Sure, holding your bins steady is the best way to detect moment - but close in that will be just a few tiny degrees of your real FOV....panning is done along shores, ridges, flats, skylines to vis-mig and scan for raptors. I wouldn't see much of anything if I stopped panning.
 

Vespobuteo

Well-known member
Your method of birding is the complete opposite of mine - I pan all the time. Sure, holding your bins steady is the best way to detect moment - but close in that will be just a few tiny degrees of your real FOV....panning is done along shores, ridges, flats, skylines to vis-mig and scan for raptors. I wouldn't see much of anything if I stopped panning.

I pan, but avoid panning continuously,
hold still, look around, move the bins, hold still, look around, move bins...etc.
IF I have my SV:s that is, with my FL:s I have to pan all the time,
due to the fuzzy edges.
 

Pileatus

"Experientia Docet”
United States
Get rid of the flat field design which I find makes the image less 3D like - at least to my eyes.
I find sharp edges enhance the 3D effect since more of the image is in sharp focus. At a certain point, I find soft edges very distracting, creating more image confusion than I want to tolerate. Over the long haul I find the SV image to be extremely relaxing, an attribute with few if any data points. ;)
 

elkcub

Silicon Valley, California
United States
Perceptions are subtle things. As with CA, try not to find what others report lest you won't be able to suppress them afterwards. Unfortunately for me, "flat-field" optics produce perceptions similar to viewing cardboard stereograms, although not as extreme. Once seen, not forgotten.

Ed
 

elkcub

Silicon Valley, California
United States
I find sharp edges enhance the 3D effect since more of the image is in sharp focus. At a certain point, I find soft edges very distracting, creating more image confusion than I want to tolerate. Over the long haul I find the SV image to be extremely relaxing, an attribute with few if any data points. ;)

What does "an attribute with few if any data points" mean? Something that may be an idiosyncrasy? Just curious.

Ed
 
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jremmons

Wildlife Biologist
Your method of birding is the complete opposite of mine - I pan all the time. Sure, holding your bins steady is the best way to detect moment - but close in that will be just a few tiny degrees of your real FOV....panning is done along shores, ridges, flats, skylines to vis-mig and scan for raptors. I wouldn't see much of anything if I stopped panning.

Agreed on this one. I can't think of a time where I'm not constantly panning, if just slightly. Different styles for differenr people of course.
 

Pileatus

"Experientia Docet”
United States
What does "an attribute with few if any data points" mean? Something that may be an idiosyncrasy? Just curious.

Ed
The attribute was "relaxing" and I have yet to find a single measurable data point to express it.

PS
After reading countless BF posts I have come to one and only one conclusion. Beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder.
 

Vespobuteo

Well-known member
I find sharp edges enhance the 3D effect since more of the image is in sharp focus. At a certain point, I find soft edges very distracting, creating more image confusion than I want to tolerate. Over the long haul I find the SV image to be extremely relaxing, an attribute with few if any data points. ;)

yep, soft edges are like warm beer.
B :) o:) ;)
 
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stephen b

Well-known member
Yes to SLC's. Either of the current versions are good. Current version is just fine if you do not need super close focus- for which I am just fine without. I can use another smaller bin for close focus viewing.

I personally like the SLC better than the SV- but that is me and my eyes. If they make a SLC upgrade model in a 8x32- then I will probably not be able to avoid getting one of those also. Really wish they would do that. Instead of of this lug nut upgrade business. I bet they would sell a bunch of the 30/32 mm size SLC HD's. As they would compete well with every 8x32 made- including the SV. But that is why they probably will not do it. So now we just have the over priced inferior CL model.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
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