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Big Binocular Search (1 Viewer)

Kevin Conville

yardbirder
I suggested the parallelogram mount for terrestrial viewing because they CAN be used from a reclining chair and many people prefer them just for that reason. You just sit in your recliner and you have nothing to impair your vision and you can make small adjustments up or down much easier than a regular tripod. A very comfortable way to observe and once you use one you won't go back to a normal tripod. If you are getting a 25x100 binocular you might be tempted to point it up at the night sky on a clear night and you can't beat the parallelogram mount for that.

Well, you got me there. I didn't think of that.
The problem, sometimes, with trying to provide a helpful answer is that in the process of envisioning what the OP is trying for, one tends to conjure how they would use them, missing something.
I was thinking being more mobile because that's how I would probably use them, though as you pointed out, one isn't likely to go far with any set up that includes these big bins.
 

james holdsworth

Consulting Biologist
In general, I hate scopes and associated paraphernalia as I like to be mobile, with my hands free, when birding. My intended purpose for a big bino would be for single location birding, with a minimum of hauling stuff around, so size and weight aren’t the biggest issue as, once I get set up, I’d be stationary for the duration.

I’ve just found, with 15x, that some Jaegers and other pelagics are beyond my visual reach and have to be left unidentified. 20x seems not enough difference and 25x would seem to be ideal in terms of reach versus magnifying atmospherics too much. Brightness shouldn’t be a big factor as we have generally bright viewing conditions here on Huron so I wonder if 100 mm is overkill.
 
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[email protected]

Well-known member
Supporter
In general, I hate scopes and associated paraphernalia as I like to be mobile, with my hands free, when birding. My intended purpose for a big bino would be for single location birding, with a minimum of hauling stuff around, so size and weight aren’t the biggest issue as, once I get set up, I’d be stationary for the duration.

I’ve just found, with 15x, that some Jaegers and other pelagics are beyond my visual reach and have to be left unidentified. 20x seems not enough difference and 25x would seem to be ideal in terms of reach versus magnifying atmospherics too much. Brightness shouldn’t be a big factor as we have generally bright viewing conditions here on Huron so I wonder if 100 mm is overkill.
I have used 25x100 binoculars for Pelagics, and they are amazing. You just scan with the binoculars and all of a sudden a bird will appear in the FOV that you can't even SEE with your normal vision. You had no idea it was there. The 25x100s are a bit of overkill for birding and a 25x70 would be more portable and allow you to use a smaller tripod if you're just using them for birding in bright conditions but the 25x100 will be more versatile if are going to use them for birding and astronomy. The 100mm aperture would allow you to go much deeper into the night sky. Either way you have to use a tripod but the 25x70 wouldn't need as big of one. If you are just using it for Pelagics in the daytime a 25x70 would work fine. If you want the ultimate big eye terrestrial binocular here is the Oberwerk "Border Guard". They use these in the Middle East and are used by the US border patrol. Also, if you have a nice place to view from in your living room there is the Yamato" - 20x120mm Bigeye Binoculars from www.luxxoptica.com. Big binos are really fun. Good thread, James.

https://oberwerk.com/product/oberwerk-2540x100mm-long-range-observation-binocular-classic-edition/
https://astromart.com/classifieds/a...culars/show/yamato-20x120mm-bigeye-binoculars
https://www.luxxoptica.com/
 

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Joshrichards78

New member
United States
"The tripods that Dennis attached are not particularly well suited for terrestrial viewing, with the (possible) exception to #3, IMO.I have a parallelogram mount, and they are really best suitable for night sky viewing in a reclining chair."

I suggested the parallelogram mount for terrestrial viewing because they CAN be used from a reclining chair and many people prefer them just for that reason. You just sit in your recliner and you have nothing to impair your vision and you can make small adjustments up or down much easier than a regular tripod. A very comfortable way to observe and once you use one you won't go back to a normal tripod. If you are getting a 25x100 binocular you might be tempted to point it up at the night sky on a clear night and you can't beat the parallelogram mount for that.

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/585458-ukraine-parallelogram-mount/
Thanks for suggestions!
 

b-lilja

Well-known member
Fun thread indeed. Reading about pelagic viewing is pretty exciting.

I've been intrigued by the big Nikons - no love?
 

NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
I have both the 16x56 and 20x56 Nikon Monarch 5 models, they do well at their price points.

In the lower area of $5-600 I don't think there is anything else that compares very well.

Big binoculars are like very small binoculars, it is hard to make them with a quality view at the lower price ranges.

In the mid-range the Zeiss Conquest HD and Meopta Meostar, do very well, and the Swarovski is the next step better.

I happen to own models of all of these I have mentioned.

Jerry
 
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edwincjones

Well-known member
Fun thread indeed. Reading about pelagic viewing is pretty exciting.

I've been intrigued by the big Nikons - no love?
big Nikons---are you thinking the 20x120s at B&H for $7000, 9000 with mount?

these are probably great for a fixed mount on a boat,
but cheaper options from Overwerk, APM, others
with interchange angled EPs and glass qualities.

edj
 

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