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Big scale upgrading to critically endangered? (1 Viewer)

beeater

New member
As of now, there is only a handful of species in the Phillipines in this grim category. I am questioning if there should be more and I hope someone can clarify the issues of the forests on Mindanao.

Every single trip report from PICOP describes a hopeless scene with the forest disappearing in front of them. Are there any protected forests at all left? Because if the situation is as bad as these reports indicate, then surely several more species must be more than just vulnerable? Wonderful species like Steeres Pitta, Wattled broadbill, Monarchs, Silvery Kingfisher etc.

If there is to be any hope of some protection still, the critical condition of these birds need to be heard.

I would also be interested in knowing if there are any progress agains the deforestation in the Phillipines at all? Very little info to find online.
 

Espen

Well-known member
Hi, I'd like to second this request, Just been looking into the Philippines for the first time, (purely out of interest) and whilst skimming found this thread....

Thanks

Espen
 

temmie

Well-known member
Just my 2 cents:
- yes the birds are highly endangered, but it is not known to what degree, as long as no extensive surveys are done on the whole island.
- protection of national and protected parks is, as in some other countries, only on paper.
- As the rate of deforestation is very high in lowland Mindanao, it is very confrontating to go birdwatching there. That is why this is so much highlighted in reports. The evil little guy on my shoulder also thinks it has something to do with marketing ("go now, before it is too late"), but the deforestation is still rampant and reports are not exaggerating.
- To conclude and just for the info: you can still see most of the endemics easily in Kitanglad/Picop, but you have travel longer in the morning to get to good forest. There will be a day when there is no good accessible forest left at PICOP, and from that moment, alternative sites will still hold the birds, but the logistics will be much more complicated.
 

Espen

Well-known member
Just my 2 cents:
- yes the birds are highly endangered, but it is not known to what degree, as long as no extensive surveys are done on the whole island.
- protection of national and protected parks is, as in some other countries, only on paper.
- As the rate of deforestation is very high in lowland Mindanao, it is very confrontating to go birdwatching there. That is why this is so much highlighted in reports. The evil little guy on my shoulder also thinks it has something to do with marketing ("go now, before it is too late"), but the deforestation is still rampant and reports are not exaggerating.
- To conclude and just for the info: you can still see most of the endemics easily in Kitanglad/Picop, but you have travel longer in the morning to get to good forest. There will be a day when there is no good accessible forest left at PICOP, and from that moment, alternative sites will still hold the birds, but the logistics will be much more complicated.

Thanks, very sad indeed :C
 

temmie

Well-known member
An update: road 4-2, known to still hold some pristine forest, is not safe anymore from cutting. Zardo Goring is reporting that they are birding between chainsaws and falling trees. Very sad.
 

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