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Bird Identification please (1 Viewer)

DavidC

Well-known member
I recently did a cruise around Iceland and got notified of this bird on one of the balconies. It appeared to have been with us a while and was receiving regular hand outs of food. It moved from one balcony to another and carried on getting fed, seems as if the new people were putting out grapes and cheese.
 

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Sangahyando

Well-known member
Looks like some kind of New World Sparrow, in poor health.

edit: White-throated Sparrow, perhaps?
 
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Kratter

Well-known member
The only similar New World sparrow is Seaside Sparrow, which would be very unexpected (only a short distance migrant and restricted to coastal salt marshes north to Massachusetts). I was thinking that that it must be a Old World bird, but it really does look good for Seaside Sparrow, however unlikely.

Andy.
 

Sangahyando

Well-known member
The only similar New World sparrow is Seaside Sparrow, which would be very unexpected (only a short distance migrant and restricted to coastal salt marshes north to Massachusetts). I was thinking that that it must be a Old World bird, but it really does look good for Seaside Sparrow, however unlikely.

Andy.
Well, Iceland is quite a bit closer to North America than the rest of Europe. Maybe they picked it up somewhere west of the island, or maybe there was a stop in America involved?
FWIW, it doesn't look like any European bird I can think of.
 
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DavidC

Well-known member
Thanks for the replies. I am not sure how long it was on the ship, the ship had been America but about a month before so unlikely it was on for that long.The maids noticed it when the ship was off Norway before we got on. It didn't seem to be like a usual passenger that flies from balcony to balcony, this one just hopped underneath the partitions. I think it would of had a few birders out if it had got off in Newcastle where we docked.
 

Bismarck Honeyeater

Barely known member
I recently did a cruise around Iceland and got notified of this bird on one of the balconies. It appeared to have been with us a while and was receiving regular hand outs of food. It moved from one balcony to another and carried on getting fed, seems as if the new people were putting out grapes and cheese.

Hi David,

This would be the first Western Palearctic record of Seaside Sparrow. Could you please give any information as to where the boat originated, route, date bird first seen and whereabouts the boat was whilst the bird was being seen.

Many thanks
 

Garden birder

Registered User
Hi David,

This would be the first Western Palearctic record of Seaside Sparrow. Could you please give any information as to where the boat originated, route, date bird first seen and whereabouts the boat was whilst the bird was being seen.

Many thanks[/QUOTE

Feet look in poor condition. Possibly spent some time in captivity
 

Bismarck Honeyeater

Barely known member
Hi David,

This would be the first Western Palearctic record of Seaside Sparrow. Could you please give any information as to where the boat originated, route, date bird first seen and whereabouts the boat was whilst the bird was being seen.

Many thanks[/QUOTE

Feet look in poor condition. Possibly spent some time in captivity

You should see my feet, and I've never been in captivity.

Seriously, it's just gunk, sand, food covering the feet. The likelihood of a captive Seaside Sparrow landing on a boat off Iceland must be much less than a genuinely wild bird getting on board in dock off the East coast of the US, I would have thought
 

DavidC

Well-known member
It was aboard the Balmoral sailing from Newcastle on 31st May, before this the ship had done 2 cruises In Norway from the 21st May to the 31st, and before this it had done a USA cruise that was from the 16th April to the 21st May... But not sure which ports, trying to find out.
The bird did seem pretty tame or sick, you could get within 8ft to photograph, and the people said that it would hop in their door if the balcony door was left open. this could of been for warmth as it did get quite cold. The bird definitely had a two tone bill and a white chin that does not seem to come out well in photographs.
 

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Bismarck Honeyeater

Barely known member
It was aboard the Balmoral sailing from Newcastle on 31st May, before this the ship had done 2 cruises In Norway from the 21st May to the 31st, and before this it had done a USA cruise that was from the 16th April to the 21st May... But not sure which ports, trying to find out.
The bird did seem pretty tame or sick, you could get within 8ft to photograph, and the people said that it would hop in their door if the balcony door was left open. this could of been for warmth as it did get quite cold. The bird definitely had a two tone bill and a white chin that does not seem to come out well in photographs.

Interesting, if it had joined in the US it stayed on board for a long time!
 

Silverwolf

Well-known member
This sure looks like a seaside sparrow which is an interesting record. How did it end up on the boat, I wonder...I can't imagine this reclusive marshland bird flying specifically onto a ferry at the docks.
 

P.Sunesen

Well-known member
You should see my feet, and I've never been in captivity.

Seriously, it's just gunk, sand, food covering the feet. The likelihood of a captive Seaside Sparrow landing on a boat off Iceland must be much less than a genuinely wild bird getting on board in dock off the East coast of the US, I would have thought

Agree that the bird has some debris sticking to the feet, but the longer than normal looking claws (albeit without knowing the species) and the way the toes seem to be unnaturally twisted (the bird's left foot in the middle photo in # 10) does suggest that a still moderately developed case of papilloma virus could perhaps be the reason.

http://birdsdk.blogspot.dk/2014/05/papillomavirus-hos-bogfinke.html

Peter
 
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