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Bird sound recording question -Reducing handling noise and faff (1 Viewer)

leonardo_simon

Well-known member
Hello – I’d like some advice about my sound recording set up (see photo) and particularly any simple ideas on how to reduce handling noise and reduce faff in the field.

I‘m using a qtd sg300 shotgun microphone that I attach to a Tascam DR-05X recorder. I’m pretty happy with the set up and the quality of the recordings is fine for my purposes at present.

1) Can anyone recommend me a way to help reduce handling noise please? I don’t really want a professional shock mount due to bulk and fragility. I would like a solution that i can chuck in the bag and not worry about.
2) in the same thread - ideally I’d like the whole system to work one-handed - has anyone tried fixing the recorder to the mic ?

Any thoughts most appreciated, thanks!


PS I’ve also got a Rode Videomic NTG that I use with my camera — it’s got a shock mount that seems to work well but clearly is rather fragile- can’t just be chucked into a bag and forgotten about. I’ve not tried this with the Tascam recorder yet - might this give better results or be used to help address my queries above?
 

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Jon.Bryant

Well-known member
Looks like both your mics are the same diameter, so you could use the camera Rode Videomic NTG shockmount, but you would need some form of pistol grip to hold and attach the shock mount to. This should help reduce handling noise, but you can still get noise transmitted along the cables from moving or operating the recorder. With a more expensive suspension systems there would be a thinner cable connection from the suspension system to the mic, to isolate this noise also (as per the photo below).

Suspension system.jpg

Not sure how you can make a shock mount more robust. I have a shock mount inside a zeppelin type wind shield, which provides a degree of protection - I have never felt like the suspension was in danger of being broken. I have to be more careful about squashing the zeppelin than I do about possibly damaging the suspension system - particularly when packing for a holiday. The problem is that a full zeppelin with shock mount, pistol grip and wind cover would be expensive and bulky. A lot of shock mounts are modular with replaceable parts, so it may be worth checking with Rode whether the mic holder clips (in red in your photo) are replaceable and at what cost - I suspect that this is the only part that could break. Maybe an option would be from time to time replace a broken clip.

With regard to the one handed operation, I really think you need to get a 32bit float recorder to try this, as then you don't need to control gain levels. Otherwise with the mic and recorder in close proximity it would be easy to generate noise when operating the recorder controls. Also you would still probably need two hands, unless you can hold the pistol grip and still press record and adjust levels with the one hand. The only other solution would be to wing it, choose a recording level, don't modify it, and hope the recording works out OK. On the 32bit float front, I am looking to invest in the Zoom F3 to see if the utopia of one handed operation can be made a reality - set the recorder going, start birding, aim the mic at things of interest and perhaps even watch the bird, holding your bins in the other hand!
 

Jon.Bryant

Well-known member
Forgot to say, SmallRig may be a possible source for a handle or pistol grip. I bought one from them that has a standard flashgun shoe connection, which is presumable how you currently connect the suspension to your camera.
 

leonardo_simon

Well-known member
Looks like both your mics are the same diameter, so you could use the camera Rode Videomic NTG shockmount, but you would need some form of pistol grip to hold and attach the shock mount to. This should help reduce handling noise, but you can still get noise transmitted along the cables from moving or operating the recorder. With a more expensive suspension systems there would be a thinner cable connection from the suspension system to the mic, to isolate this noise also (as per the photo below).

View attachment 1436206

Not sure how you can make a shock mount more robust. I have a shock mount inside a zeppelin type wind shield, which provides a degree of protection - I have never felt like the suspension was in danger of being broken. I have to be more careful about squashing the zeppelin than I do about possibly damaging the suspension system - particularly when packing for a holiday. The problem is that a full zeppelin with shock mount, pistol grip and wind cover would be expensive and bulky. A lot of shock mounts are modular with replaceable parts, so it may be worth checking with Rode whether the mic holder clips (in red in your photo) are replaceable and at what cost - I suspect that this is the only part that could break. Maybe an option would be from time to time replace a broken clip.

With regard to the one handed operation, I really think you need to get a 32bit float recorder to try this, as then you don't need to control gain levels. Otherwise with the mic and recorder in close proximity it would be easy to generate noise when operating the recorder controls. Also you would still probably need two hands, unless you can hold the pistol grip and still press record and adjust levels with the one hand. The only other solution would be to wing it, choose a recording level, don't modify it, and hope the recording works out OK. On the 32bit float front, I am looking to invest in the Zoom F3 to see if the utopia of one handed operation can be made a reality - set the recorder going, start birding, aim the mic at things of interest and perhaps even watch the bird, holding your bins in the other hand!

Thanks for that -- yes the zoom f3 looks really good..... it you try it let us know how it works !
 

iveljay

Well-known member
Well I've attached Olympus LS-14s to a mic with strong rubber bands, The DR05 is a bit bulkier and heavier so with a longer lead you could try velcroing it to your jacket.
 

leonardo_simon

Well-known member
Thanks @Jon.Bryant and @iveljay

I suppose for most of the time I don't want a shock mount because it will get broken.

So I'm after a compromise solution that's more robust that I can take up a mountain etc and shove in my rucsac and not worry about.

I'll have a look at smallrig & see what they have.....
 

leonardo_simon

Well-known member
Just done some testing in the garden -- the Rode microphone is so much better than the qtc one - wow! much clearer ..... I'll try and adapt that one instead.
 

Joop99

Active member
Netherlands
Attached a hot shoe mount to the underside of the sound recorder- now this can work one handed …….. now to find a more robust shock mount
There are none or they are much bulkier, but still act the same. If you want more reducing handling noise then you have three options. One is use a woolen clove, but if you have to put force on the grip then it could introduce other unwanted sounds. Second, use an electronic filter if present and set it to the highest frequency. Third, offload weight in your hands. Is it really necessary to hold the recorder? Can you put it into a pocket? in order only holding the microphone. As it is your set and your hands, you have to experiment with it.
 

ermine

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Can anyone recommend me a way to help reduce handling noise please? I don’t really want a professional shock mount due to bulk and fragility. I would like a solution that i can chuck in the bag and not worry about.

Foam pipe lagging (with rubber bands if necessary) on a solid handle, and listening through your recorder. It's not as good as a shockmount, but you can't beat the price and robustness, and if you listen as you record you can learn a little bit how to relax your grip enough. The other way is to hold the mic handle very loosely or even in an open hand, but that doesn't really work with a shotgun due to the centre of gravity.
 

Borjam

Registered User
Supporter
Spain
Thanks @Jon.Bryant and @iveljay

I suppose for most of the time I don't want a shock mount because it will get broken.

So I'm after a compromise solution that's more robust that I can take up a mountain etc and shove in my rucsac and not worry about.

I'll have a look at smallrig & see what they have.....
Don't underestimate the sturdiness of Rycote's Lyres, used also by Rode in some of their suspensions.

I have a couple of SM4-R I use for the piano microphones at the club and I just transport them in a bag with plenty of stuff. After two years they look brand new. I transport them fully assembled. If you disasemble the lyres I bet you won't be able to destroy them ;)

 

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