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Bird Watcher vs Birder (1 Viewer)

Trinovid

mountain and glacier watcher
United States
Ravens and eagles both seem to exist in the "social animal" category along with humans and wolves.
As someone who has seen and heard lots of all three, eagles, ravens and wolves, I always find it fascinating to hear them in real life and how they sound completely different in cinema.

Sure, wolves howl when they’re trying to gather from distance, but it changes to a more abrupt yipping sound that people tend to associate with coyotes as they get closer together, and then suddenly, silence.

Ravens too, caw at times, but if you only see them on tv then you’d think that was the only sound they were capable of. Contrarily, they often make baby-like gibberish sounds, as well as an endless array of vocalizations, including one of my personal favorites, the giant drop-of-water sound.
Then there’s my favorite raven story, which I read about at the library on Prince of Wales Island regarding the naming of Klawock, and how it came to be after the Tlingkits noticed that the ravens there made an uncommon cry; klawock.
Ridiculous! was my first thought, but a few days later in a bike ride in Klawock I heard it. Klawock………..klawok……..klawock.
A couple of decades later, after having paid close attention to ravens the entire time and over wide ranging exposure to ravens, I have never yet heard them make that sound any where else. Not even in the Prince of Wales communities of Hydaburg, Hollis, Coffman Cove or Craig. But they do in Klawock.

Eagles however, totally different. Anyone that has ever seen eagles on tv thinks that they scream. Never, ever, ever have I heard eagles accurately voiced in common media. The fake scream heard on tv is totally inferior to the actual chittering sound that they make and that I love so much.

All raven fans should try to go to Prince of Wales Island someday and hear the ravens in and around Klawock, and at the same time see some of the least shy eagles of anywhere else I’ve ever seen them, inclusive of the rest of Alaska.
 

Scott98

Well-known member
Vanuatu
Interesting to see an article on this very topic in the New York Times today - it's an article about a book that just came out....

After a Frantic Year, It’s Time for ‘Slow Birding’​

A new book borrows from the slow food movement to propose a more thoughtful, less competitive form of bird-watching.

Slow Birding: The Art and Science of Enjoying the Birds in Your Own Backyard​

 

Steve Babbs

Well-known member
but I will watch little birds who have names I don't know,
A birder could be defined as someone who could not cope with the not knowing and would have to know. Many birders are not obsessed with lists, and of course do watch birds for the sheer pleasure of it, but it's in the 'job description' to know, or work out, what the bird is they're watching for the pleasure of it..
 

Trinovid

mountain and glacier watcher
United States
A birder could be defined as someone who could not cope with the not knowing and would have to know. Many birders are not obsessed with lists, and of course do watch birds for the sheer pleasure of it, but it's in the 'job description' to know, or work out, what the bird is they're watching for the pleasure of it..
I've just always enjoyed being able to view mountains, trees, islands, small birds, and yes, even people, none of whose names I know, and the ones that interest me the most, I'll try to ask when I get the chance. Hence, bald eagles, ravens, black capped chickadees...
 

Steve Babbs

Well-known member
I've just always enjoyed being able to view mountains, trees, islands, small birds, and yes, even people, none of whose names I know, and the ones that interest me the most, I'll try to ask when I get the chance. Hence, bald eagles, ravens, black capped chickadees...
Nothing wrong with that. It just the label birder wouldn't fit. Birdwatcher would.
 

Mono

Hi!
Staff member
Supporter
Europe
In his Little Black Bird Book Bill Oddie devotes a whole chapter to bird-watcher/birder/twitcher.

The Google Books preview, by chance, features most of that chapter.

 

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