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'Bird you would most want to hear on the last day of your life (1 Viewer)

Jonno52

John (a bad birdwatcher)
Supporter
United Kingdom
I would like the loneliest yet loveliest of sounds, the wail of the Great Northern Diver (Common Loon) echoing across a lake, as if from a great distance.

(Definitely not a Blackbird, which to my ear is quite unmusical).
 
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connorco

Well-known member
United States
It might seem like a weird pick, but I might choose the classic song of the Mourning Dove. It's just a nostalgic sound that seems to fit the occasion.
 

PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Just a blackbird on the top of its lungs would be sufficient, last few seconds a bullfinch making its lovely soft sweet goodbye

Aye, I've seen a lot more birds in the past year, and it would remain one of: blackbird, robin, song thrush, mistle thrush, sedge warbler, skylark. Probably blackbird but either of the others would be a very good substitute.
 

PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
There is nothing on earth that can bring joy to my heart quicker than a Blackbird on a summers evening.

He's just absolutely beautiful in all ways isn't he (and a tyrant but then again I suppose there aren't any human morals in a bird world of breeding and survival meaning everything).

When I rank my favourite birds I always think of which birds I would miss the most in the event birds cease to exist and they are: Blackbird, Robin, Kestrel.

'Love to hear the Mistle Thrush sing also.
 

01101001

Well-known member
Opus Editor
Poland
I remember last year's late spring and early summer with Marsh Warblers singing all day and nightingales of both species singing all night. I wonder if it gets any better than that.
 

Paul Chapman

Well-known member
I remember last year's late spring and early summer with Marsh Warblers singing all day and nightingales of both species singing all night. I wonder if it gets any better than that.
Never heard both Nightingales at the same sites but this threesome hits the right notes for me. I do still enjoy a humble Robin or Blackbird as well. Sadly my hearing is not great on calls etc.

All the best

Paul
 

01101001

Well-known member
Opus Editor
Poland
Never heard both Nightingales at the same sites but this threesome hits the right notes for me. I do still enjoy a humble Robin or Blackbird as well. Sadly my hearing is not great on calls etc.

All the best

Paul

Here they are both in one recording, occupying adjacent territories on two different sides of a street (the diagnostic whistles of Common Nightingale are only heard in the background towards the end): ML528150651 Thrush Nightingale Macaulay Library.
 

PaulCountyDurham

Well-known member
United Kingdom
I think the songs that really linger viscerally in my mind are thrushes. Varied thrush, even hermit thrush.

Aye, it's not only their songs but their all-round behaviour also. Of all the bird species, thrushes and chats are the most appealing to me.

I'm not sure if you can see this from the United States, but this video of a Hermit Thrush is just sheer beauty. If I ever go to the United States for the purpose of bird watching, this is the bird I'd want to see.

 

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