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Birding Barra de Navidad, Mexico 3 (1 Viewer)

SueO

Well-known member
Four more birds to add to the April 16-30 list:
Crested Caracara
Lesser Goldfinch
Common Moorhen
Northern Jacana
I also saw a Crocodile, Coati Mundi and some other good stuff--but the best was a possible group of Shearwaters on a rocky out-cropping on the Pacific Ocean side of the peninsula. I was putting the camera down after getting a photo of the Crested Caracara, when I saw a bird perched on the top of a tall rocky outcrop (island?). It was way too far away, but I clicked off a few photos, then put my bins up. Really couldn't make out what it was. I was borrowing Peregrine's caretaker's car and had been out for a couple of hours and thought I should take it back. I returned the keys and went aboard to download my photos. I was surprised to see that the bird on the rock looked like a Shearwater of some kind and that there were birds, not bird. I ran back to my friend and asked if I could use the car again. He said yes, and I thanked him profusely saying if I got a Townsend's, he will have made my year! A few minutes later, I was headed back. There are some steep stairs cut into the headland and I thought if I climbed them, I could get close enough to get some views and possibly some identifiable photos. While aboard, I did some looking to see what Shearwaters might be here. I came up with Pink-footed, Wedge-tailed, Black-vented, Townsend's and Audubon's. I was really excited that I might be able to see this bird better and be able to ID it. Went through the two guard stations again, but having just seen me, they waved me on. I parked, hurried over to the hill, put up my bins--no birds. I was only gone an hour and a half! I was really kicking myself for not trying to get closer the first time. It was just difficult because the tide was high and the surf was big, so walking out on the beach to see closer was out of the question and the steps looked formidable. I did go up the steps I could get to from the beach, but they ended suddenly and didn't connect to the long stretch of stairs (I am posting photos so this will be clearer). I had on my flip flops and I was afraid of banging my bins and camera against the granite rocks, so I didn't attempt to crawl/climb to see if I could connect to the stairs that go to the top. It didn't look possible. I drove back and turned the keys in again. He said I could take the car again tomorrow, that he would be here about seven. Love this guy! After looking at the photos again, I have ruled out Wedge-tailed and Sooty. They seem too dark. This bird appears to be black on the back and white underneath. The "Audubon's" is apparently a Galapagos on the west coast. So, I try again tomorrow. Don't know how I can get closer. I'm thinking I could put my gear in a wet bag in my backpack and maybe do some crawling to get to the steps. I did check it out today, and I just don't think I can do it. I have a feeling that even if the birds are there, I won't be able to get closer. This can really be an aggravating hobby at times.
Photos: I couldn't see around the point, but I think the rocky place the birds were on is an islet. I know these are impossible ID photos, but if anyone has any ideas, please let me know. I have heavily cropped and did a little sharpening. I could be wrong about them being Shearwaters at all!
 

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SueO

Well-known member
Here's another photo of what may be one of the birds in flight. I think there are four birds in the photo. It's 12:45 a.m. here, going to get some sleep.
 

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SueO

Well-known member
Having my coffee and looking at the blobs on the screen. I found a few on the side of the hill--they look too upright for Shearwaters. When the Galapagos Shearwaters landed on Peregrine, they looked 'boneless' almost. Also, where did they all go? At the time, I thought maybe they were out hunting. Maybe I can get a better look today and solve this.
 

SueO

Well-known member
Crap birder of the year here. It's tough to admit that my Townsend's Shearwater morphed into a Grey-breasted Martin (or something Martinish or Swallowish), but that's what happened. When I got to the site, I saw some Snowy Egrets on the lower levels of the rocky cliffs. I could see them clearly, why not the birds at the top? I started up the steps I could reach, got to the top of them, looked down, and got too scared to go on. It was not a good situation for a Rubenesque Great-Grandmother! I slowly butt-scooted back down to the beach. As I walked to where I could see the islet, a huge wave broke over the steps I was just on. Rather be lucky than good any day. The waves were monsters again today. Incredible power! I watched Neotropic Cormorants flying over the islet in large groups and they were huge compared to the little guys on the rocks. The mystery birds were small, not even close to the size of a shearwater. I could see them perched on the top of the rock hill, but out of range of my 10x32 bins to see them well. I guess I thought they were larger yesterday because they looked so far away. Theoretically, my camera is the same power as my bins, but I think I can get just a bit more out of the camera. I got some lousy shots of the birds in flight. They flew closer to me, but quite high, and I got a few shots off. My best guess is Grey-breasted Martins. Feeling really stupid, I packed up my gear up and trudged along the sand to the car. On my drive out, I saw a woody with a bright red crest perched on the side of one of the palms in the median. I had driven past it, so I backed up, grabbed the bins off the passenger side and got a great view of a female Lineated Woodpecker! Of course, she was gone before I could get a photo. No matter, I saw her very clearly. New addition to the Barra List. I also am adding a White Ibis to the April 16-30th list. We leave on Saturday. I don't want to go. My husband asked me before we left if I wanted 2 weeks or 3. Wish I'd said 3. I will post a total of birds seen these last two weeks and also post my total list for Barra. I won't add the martin to the list unless someone can verify what I think it is. I'm going to make a Painkiller and take a paperback to the beach. Hasta Luego.
 

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SueO

Well-known member
We leave tomorrow. We will spend most of today getting Peregrine ready for the hurricane season. If I happen to get a new bird for the list, I will add it. Hopefully we'll be back sometime in July.

April 16-30 Barra de Navidad List:
  1. Brown Pelican
  2. Magnificent Frigatebird
  3. Neotropic Cormorant
  4. Great Blue Heron
  5. Snowy Egret
  6. Little Blue Heron
  7. Green Heron
  8. Great Egret
  9. Great Blue Heron
  10. White Ibis
  11. Black Vulture
  12. Turkey Vulture
  13. Crested Caracara
  14. West Mexican Chachalaca
  15. Common Moorhen
  16. Willet
  17. Spotted Sandpiper
  18. Northern Jacana
  19. Heerman's Gull
  20. Royal Tern
  21. White-winged Dove
  22. Inca Dove
  23. Eurasian Collared Dove
  24. Groove-billed Ani
  25. Common Pauraque
  26. Cinnamon Hummingbird
  27. Golden-crowned Emerald
  28. Broad-billed Hummingbird
  29. Citreoline Trogon
  30. Ringed Kingfisher
  31. Golden-cheeked Woodpecker
  32. Pale-billed Woodpecker
  33. Lineated Woodpecker
  34. Pacific Slope/Cordillian Flycatcher
  35. Northern Beardless Tyrannulet
  36. Brown-crested Flycatcher
  37. Nutting's Flycatcher
  38. Ash-throated Flycatcher (?)
  39. Tropical Kingbird
  40. Great Kiskadee
  41. Social Flycatcher
  42. Rose-throated Becard
  43. Warbling Vireo
  44. Bell's Vireo
  45. San Blas Jay
  46. Barn Swallow
  47. Mangrove Swallow
  48. Northern Rough-winged Swallow
  49. White-bellied Wren
  50. Happy Wren
  51. Rufous-backed Thrush
  52. Yellow Warbler
  53. Louisiana Waterthrush
  54. House Sparrow
  55. Stripe-headed Sparrow
  56. Orange-breasted Bunting
  57. Varied Bunting
  58. Blue Bunting
  59. Scrub Euphonia
  60. Greyish Saltator
  61. White-collared Seedeater
  62. Bronzed Cowbird
  63. Great-tailed Grackle
  64. Yellow-winged Cacique
  65. Black-vented Oriole
  66. Streak-backed Oriole
  67. Lesser Goldfinch
 

Lisa W

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
If I remember correctly you were there for 2 weeks? This is a really nice list for that amount of time.
 

SueO

Well-known member
I had a total Barra List posted, but realized it was missing a few birds, so I deleted it. I will update it and post after I get home.
 
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SueO

Well-known member
A few more images. Citreoline Trogon, Orange-breasted Bunting, Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher,
 

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BryanP

Little known member
Canada
Hi Sue,
Nice to see the Orange-breasted Buntings are still there, we’d see them up on the hotel Lawn regularly. How common are the Cinnamon Hummers? I wasn’t able to see one for some reason when we were there.
 

SueO

Well-known member
Hi Sue,
Nice to see the Orange-breasted Buntings are still there, we’d see them up on the hotel Lawn regularly. How common are the Cinnamon Hummers? I wasn’t able to see one for some reason when we were there.
Hi Bryan. Hope you are well. Sorry you missed the Cinnamon, I see it most days when I bird. It seems to be the most common hummer here most of the time, but this visit I saw the Broad-billed more often than the Cinnamon.
 

SueO

Well-known member
My Barra de Navidad Bird List:
  1. Brown Pelican
  2. Blue-footed Booby
  3. Magnificent Frigatebird
  4. Neotropical Cormorant
  5. Black-crowned Night Heron
  6. Yellow-crowned Night Heron
  7. Great Egret
  8. Snowy Egret
  9. Great Blue Heron
  10. Tri-colored Heron
  11. Green Heron
  12. Little Blue Heron
  13. Roseate Spoonbill
  14. Wood Stork
  15. Turkey Vulture
  16. Black Vulture
  17. Gray Hawk
  18. Crested Caracara
  19. Common Black Hawk
  20. Crane Hawk
  21. Zone-tailed Hawk
  22. Short-tailed Hawk
  23. West Mexican Chachalaca
  24. American Oystercatcher
  25. Northern Jacana
  26. Marbled Godwit
  27. Spotted Sandpiper
  28. Whimbrel
  29. Willet
  30. Laughing Gull
  31. Heerman’s Gull
  32. Royal Tern
  33. Inca Dove
  34. Ruddy Ground Dove
  35. White-winged Dove
  36. White-tipped Dove
  37. Eurasian Collared Dove
  38. Orange-fronted Parakeet
  39. Groove-billed Ani
  40. Lesser Ground-Cuckoo
  41. Squirrel Cuckoo
  42. Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl
  43. Common Pauraque
  44. Cinnamon Hummingbird
  45. Golden-crowned Emerald
  46. Broad-billed Hummingbird
  47. Plain-capped Starthroat
  48. Citreoline Trogon
  49. Belted Kingfisher
  50. Ringed Kingfisher
  51. Golden-cheeked Woodpecker
  52. Pale-billed Woodpecker
  53. Lineated Woodpecker
  54. Ivory-billed Woodcreeper
  55. Ash-throated Flycatcher
  56. Brown-crested Flycatcher
  57. Cordilleran Flycatcher/Pacific Coast Flycatcher
  58. Dusky-capped Flycatcher
  59. Great Kiskadee
  60. Masked Tityra
  61. Northern Beardless Tyrannulet
  62. Rose-throated Becard
  63. Nutting's Flycatcher
  64. Social Flycatcher
  65. Sulfur-bellied Flycatcher
  66. Thick-billed Flycatcher
  67. Tropical Kingbird
  68. Vermillion Flycatcher
  69. Northern rough-winged swallow
  70. Barn swallow
  71. Mangrove Swallow
  72. San Blas Jay
  73. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
  74. Rufous-backed Thrush
  75. White-throated Thrush
  76. Blue Mockingbird
  77. Northern Mockingbird
  78. Black-capped Vireo
  79. Golden Vireo
  80. Plumbeous Vireo
  81. Warbling Vireo
  82. Yellow-green Vireo
  83. Bell's Vireo
  84. Yellow Warbler
  85. MacGillivray's Warbler
  86. Black and White Warbler
  87. Black-throated Gray Warbler
  88. Nashville Warbler
  89. Wilson's Warbler
  90. Townsend's Warbler
  91. Northern Waterthrush
  92. Red-breasted Chat
  93. Yellow-breasted Chat
  94. Tropical Parula
  95. Summer Tanager
  96. Western Tanager
  97. Scrub Euphonia
  98. Happy Wren
  99. Sinaloa Wren
  100. White-bellied Wren
  101. Grayish Saltator
  102. Yellow Grosbeak
  103. White-collared Seedeater
  104. Orange-breasted Bunting
  105. Painted Bunting
  106. Varied Bunting
  107. Blue Bunting
  108. Stripe-headed sparrow
  109. House Sparrow
  110. Bronzed Cowbird
  111. Brown-headed Cowbird
  112. Yellow-winged Cacique
  113. Great-tailed Grackle
  114. Orchard Oriole
  115. Streak-backed Oriole
  116. Black-vented Oriole
  117. Lesser Goldfinch
 

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