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Birds' diseases (2 Viewers)

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If you were thinking to superheat your water to 250 C or so ...then yes it may melt your feeders!
The suggestion given several times from from different persons was 'warm soapy water' or simply hot, like from a tap or even kettle ...if you are using a normal tube feeder it will not melt.
 
I said: If I use hot water on the tube feeder, which is made of plastic - it will shrink the feeder. I just asked you one thing: is spirit (96% alcohol) good for cleaning feeders, because I know that some people clean their feeders using the alcohol and you say that I don’t want help from you…
JayFeather, do as you wish. I cannot assist any further whilst you just appear to be argumentative and unwilling to try what has been suggested in very good faith.
And a small word of thanks for the replies would have been courteous.
Bye.
 
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JayFeather, do as you wish. I cannot assist any further whilst you just appear to be argumentative and unwilling to try what has been suggested in very good faith.
And a small word of thanks for the replies would have been courteous.
Bye.
You act as if I don't want to listen to your advice at all and as if I have no intention of cleaning the feeders at all. If I ask and you answer me that I don't want to listen to you and I am super negative about your advice, well that's not nice.
 
🙄

If you were thinking to superheat your water to 250 C or so ...then yes it may melt your feeders!
The suggestion given several times from from different persons was 'warm soapy water' or simply hot, like from a tap or even kettle ...if you are using a normal tube feeder it will not melt.
Water at 100°C shrinks plastic, just like a plastic bottle.
 
And you can't even answer a simple question: Can I use alcohol to clean the feeder, because of course I am critical and do not want to listen to your advice.
 
And you can't even answer a simple question: Can I use alcohol to clean the feeder, because of course I am critical and do not want to listen to your advice.
Jos did answer your question a few posts back! I quote it again for you!

As you don't seem to be interested in help from here, I give you Birdlife Polska's advice - which is similar to that given here, though suggesting just hot water:

Jeśli mamy karmnik – starajmy się, aby ptasie jedzenie nie zalegało w nim. Dbajmy o czystość, sprzątajmy niezjedzone resztki pokarmu i dezynfekujmy karmnik (gorącą wodą, bez detergentów). W ten sposób zapobiegamy także przenoszeniu chorób i drobnoustrojów między ptakami (dla człowieka są one nieszkodliwe).

Enough now!
 
"warm soapy"

But normal feeders do perfectly okay with hot water cleaning.

It's been said a dozen times - it's such simple easy advice, I kind of get the idea you are arguing for the sake of it, so it is also my last input to this thread.
 
96% alcohol is going to damage some types of plastic in the longterm. Warm water (~60°C) and soap is not. And if it does have a problem, then you don't have particularly well made feeders in the first place.
 
Thanks for the answer, but I have two questions. It says "always clean your bird feeder outside". It's not always possible, especially when there is a lot of snow, so can I clean it elsewhere? And I have to use special equipment, which is only ever used to clean bird feeders, right (that means a special bowl, brush and cloth)? So do I have to use a special screwdriver to dismantle the feeder too?
 
You have received all possible answers already - earlier advice included 'clean wherever convenient ' - so do wherever you want/feel comfortable.

As for a dedicated screwdriver, advice is the same.
 
And regarding cleaning the feeders at home, I'm just afraid that my pet cat will catch the bird's disease, so I don't know if it is safe to take feeder to home or should I clean it outdoors (or in a garage) even if it's snowing.
 
Garage; here you can keep all the cleaning pieces together ( out of the way from any pets ) and not cross contaminate. All you will need to do is fill a bucket or bowl with hot water from your basement.
 
Garage; here you can keep all the cleaning pieces together ( out of the way from any pets ) and not cross contaminate. All you will need to do is fill a bucket or bowl with hot water from your basement.
Thanks, and my last question is can I clean the feeder in the sink in the basement (and then clean the sink) or is it better to clean it in the bucket/bowl? And I guess that I have to pour away the water after the cleaning in the garden?
 
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You've already asked this several times before and we answered whatever is easier and suits you. You can wear warm clothes and shoes if it is sub zero and there is snow, and only for a few moments. Then your'e worried about your pet catching disease if you brought the feeder indoors - so we answered clean and keep everything in the garage .....away from your cat. And the dirty water can be poured away down the sink or any outside drain then flushed with hot water. And store the bird food in suitable vermin proof containers, preferably in an outbuilding so it doesn't get mouldy.
Finally, is your cat vaccinated against cat flu, it can be caught by humans in rare cases.
 
I have a simple question, if you're not willing to answer this, just don't do that. Can I clean the wooden feeder using the boiling (100°C) water alone, because boiling water kill all the bacteria and viruses. I earlier asked about cleaning tube feeders with hot water, not wooden and I'm not against cleaning the feeders if you want to know, but I just want do know if this method is also good. If not - I am ready to clean feeders in other ways.
 

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