• BirdForum is the net's largest birding community dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE!

    Register for an account to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Birds fae Torry (3 Viewers)

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
It was a pleasant evening today, after raining most of the day. Lots of birds were feeding on the calm seas, particularly gulls. Sauntering among them were three Bonxies. Also out there were six Manx Shearwaters, a Puffin and a Common Scoter. An Arctic Tern was resting on the breakwater and a male Stonechat was in Greyhope Bay.

Something else worth mentioning is the recent disappearance of most of the local Swifts. Very few have been about in the last week. This evening I only saw two over Torry. Presumably they have travelled south, possibly with the vast numbers seen moving over eastern England recently. I hope they come back soon.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
I went for quite a long walk today, south along the Aberdeenshire Coast Path towards Cove Bay. I passed through Nigg Bay on the way there.

An interesting sighting in Torry was of a young Bullfinch together with a male, just off Victoria Road. It's the first time I've seen this species in Torry itself and was my first juvenile of the year. A few second brood Moorhen were on the marsh.

It's ages since I've been along the sea cliffs during the breeding season, so it was good to see how things were going there. Kittiwakes seem to be having a very good breeding season, with hundreds of well grown chicks being tended to by adults. I only saw small numbers of young Guillemots and Razorbills, although plenty of adults were still on the cliffs. Fulmars still appeared to be incubating. A few well-grown Eider chicks were along the shore and a family of Kestrels were also about.

One species I was hoping to find was Black Guillemot. These were quite conspicuous on the sea to the north of Cove Bay, in areas where I've suspected they've bred in the past. At least four were seen, including a group of three. One bird was seen carrying a fish in to the cliffs, so they presumably have a chick somewhere.

Not too much else was about but ten Common Scoters went north and four Curlew south.
 

Attachments

  • Black Guillemot_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    Black Guillemot_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    265.2 KB · Views: 28
  • Fulmar_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    Fulmar_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    88.8 KB · Views: 17
  • Guillemot_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    Guillemot_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    236.3 KB · Views: 16
  • Razorbill_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    Razorbill_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    243 KB · Views: 16
  • Shag_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    Shag_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    227.2 KB · Views: 20

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Here are some Kittiwake chicks, as well as a Herring Gull.
 

Attachments

  • Kittiwake_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    Kittiwake_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    412.2 KB · Views: 16
  • Kittiwake_Cove Bay_040720b.jpg
    Kittiwake_Cove Bay_040720b.jpg
    394.1 KB · Views: 15
  • Kittiwake_Cove Bay_040720c.jpg
    Kittiwake_Cove Bay_040720c.jpg
    442.3 KB · Views: 15
  • Herring Gull_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    Herring Gull_Cove Bay_040720a.jpg
    387.8 KB · Views: 15

Ben Nevis

Registered User
Supporter
Scotland
Great news regarding the Kittiwake's and Black Guilliemot's,Andrew.It's been a long time since I had a walk around the cliffs.
 

burnie

Well-known member
Interesting, not seen or heard of a Tyskie on the East side, I will keep an eye out a bit south of you over the next week or so.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
A breezy, showery day today. Offshore was fairly quiet, although with plenty of Gannets feeding. A Harbour Porpoise and a Red-throated Diver were also seen.

While scanning I picked up a small gull floating head-on close to the water. As it turned, it became clear it was an adult Mediterranean Gull. Initially it was fairly distant but it came closer, often settling on the sea, before flying past and into Greyhope Bay. It moved around a bit in the bay before settling for a time on the rocks and giving great views. I last saw it sitting on the sea but it disappeared once a shower went through. Only the second summer adult I've seen here and my best ever views on patch.

A bit of video for you:
https://twitter.com/Anthrobirder/status/1279789770286170114?s=20
 

Attachments

  • Med Gull_Girdle Ness_050720a.jpg
    Med Gull_Girdle Ness_050720a.jpg
    211.1 KB · Views: 41
  • Med Gull_Girdle Ness_050720b.jpg
    Med Gull_Girdle Ness_050720b.jpg
    296.1 KB · Views: 39

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Thought Tyskie was a Polish beer. Do they migrate?

I think Burnie probably meant 'Tystie', which is the Shetland name for Black Guillemot.

Not too much this evening, but there were two Bonxies, two Puffins, a Manx Shearwater and four Common Scoter offshore.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
I think Burnie probably meant 'Tystie', which is the Shetland name for Black Guillemot.

Not too much this evening, but there were two Bonxies, two Puffins, a Manx Shearwater and four Common Scoter offshore.

Thank you, that that explains it, the curse of the typos.
I googled tyskie, the Polish beer is all that came up, so I wondered...
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
With a large Polish community locally, I've definitely seen a few Tyskie bottles about, as well as Tysties ;)

A bit of interest this evening, with a brief view of a 1st summer Little Gull offshore, which disappeared behind the foghorn quicker than I'd have liked.

Also, a single pale phase Arctic Skua, a Manx Shearwater and two Puffins north.

The local brood of Great Black-backs are now fully grown and busy playing with sticks:
https://twitter.com/Anthrobirder/status/1280564042512375808?s=20
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
I was back in Torry after a short break. This evening the showers were swirling about but mostly missed the area. It was worth heading out when I found a lovely adult Little Gull preening on the rocks at the tip of the Ness. Always nice to see one on the deck.

There were also two Common Sandpipers in the same area and an immature Peregrine sauntered through before heading southwards over the sea. Swifts seem to be back in the area, with 56 counted over Torry.

Here's some video of the Little Gull:
https://twitter.com/Anthrobirder/status/1285326711035396101?s=20
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
An adult Little Gull was again off the Coo this evening, this time sitting on the sea a few hundred yards offshore. I guess it's the same bird as yesterday, although it perhaps looked a bit blacker on the head. Also offshore were four Puffins and an Arctic Tern. A nice collection of waders were feeding amongst the seaweed on the old pier below the Coo: two Knot, a Dunlin, two Turnstone and six Ringed Plover. Redshanks also seem to be returning now.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Another interesting evening. The waders on the old pier included two Knot and two Dunlin. Turnstone numbers were up to 11. The best was a briefly seen summer-plumage Bar-tailed Godwit that flew around the Ness and looked as though it was heading towards Greyhope Bay, but I couldn't find it there. 11 Manx Shearwaters flew north. Two Arctic Terns were resting on the rocks.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
A fairly calm, muggy evening today. There was a bit happening on the sea with a Bonxie, an Arctic Skua, 13 Manx Shearwaters, 13 Common Scoters, an Arctic Tern, a Red-throated Diver and three Puffins all moving north. The waders were a bit less conspicuous but the two summer-plumage Knot eventually appeared on the rocks at the tip of the Ness.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
A fairly gloomy evening with one or two interesting birds about. Not much was happening on the sea, although six Common Scoters went south. Of most note was a moulting Black Guillemot in Nigg Bay. A Whimbrel was in Greyhope Bay and Turnstone numbers were up to 18. 65 Goosander were in the harbour and 46 Swifts were over Torry.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top