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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

Birds fae Torry (1 Viewer)

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
After taking folks out for a bird walk this afternoon, as part of the Torry Eco-museum project, I had quite an interesting seawatch. The conditions weren't very obviously good, with a brisk southwesterly, but 13 Little Auks passed by. Most were fairly distant but a few were closer. It was also quite startling to see three different Woodcock flying over the sea. I'd imagine they must have been flying since early last night. Other birds included a Little Gull, a Long-tailed Duck, two Common Scoter and nine Red-throated Divers. At least three Harbour Porpoises were also around.
 

edenwatcher

Well-known member
Meanwhile I've no idea what is going on here in Fife. The concentration of little auks is crazy and we are seeing huge numbers even in southwesterlies (when normally I wouldn't bother looking!). Plenty of grey phalaropes too (I saw 4 yesterday including a flock of 3).

Rob
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Meanwhile I've no idea what is going on here in Fife. The concentration of little auks is crazy and we are seeing huge numbers even in southwesterlies (when normally I wouldn't bother looking!). Plenty of grey phalaropes too (I saw 4 yesterday including a flock of 3).

Rob
It's been noted! I guess they're finding good feeding (and maybe shelter) in that area. Grey Phalarope remains a very big rarity around here.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Today was pretty windy. I headed straight to the Coo for a seawatch, which was reasonably good. Three Whooper Swans were seen going north almost immediately. After that, ten Little Auks were seen at various distances. Other birds moving included three Great Northern Divers, five Red-throated Divers, two Long-tailed Ducks, two Puffins and a Red-breasted Merganser. A Snipe flying over the golf course had presumably just come in off the sea.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
I've seen a flock of 17 whoopers going over the allotments at dawn twice this week. Are they the same birds going to and fro or just similar numbers in different flocks?
Hard to say, although if the flock was the same number then it's perhaps likely they're the same group. I wonder where they're heading to and from.
 

Cucurrucucu

Cucurrucucu
Supporter
Hard to say, although if the flock was the same number then it's perhaps likely they're the same group. I wonder where they're heading to and from.
When I saw them, the whoopers were coming from the beach over the North Pier and allotments. Can't be entirely sure of the number first day. They caught me unawares and were gone with only a blurry photo. But I estimated 16 of them. The next day got video to count them.
 

Ben Nevis

Registered User
Supporter
Scotland
I am currently recovering from a leg Injury and building my strength up,with the odd short walk around St Fitticks Park.This morning,Water Rail again,were obvious In various parts of the Park,with 4 Individuals calling from different areas.There were 4 Teal on the water along from the Concrete Bridge.The usual Mallard and Moorhen were on the main Pond,with a Heron In the reeds at the back.The path up from the Triangle Pitch was quiet,until some smaller birds started giving out alarm calls and I then realised why,as a female Sparrowhawk flew at speed,along the Railway Embankment.As I made my way back,a party of Long tailed Tits were feeding on the trees beside the Triangle Pitch,obviously happy the Sparrowhawk had moved on.
DSCN1632.JPG DSCN1610.JPG DSCN1622.JPG
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Nice pictures BN! I was down in St Fittick's this morning, in rather pleasant, still weather. A Mistle Thrush had taken up residence by bowling green on Victoria Road. Water Rails were vocal with at least three present, one of which showed quite well from the concrete bridge. 15 Curlew was my best count of the winter so far. The numbers we get have certainly declined over the past few winters. Two Woodcock were seen in flight, one of them going quite high and heading inland. At least 12 Siskins were also about.
 

Greybags

Member
Supporter
United Kingdom
Great pics. Where's the best place to park and access the park please? I'm guessing with all the harbour redevelopment one probably needs to head into the housing and park near the playpark at Balnagask Circle?
Thanks
GB
 

Ben Nevis

Registered User
Supporter
Scotland
Great pics. Where's the best place to park and access the park please? I'm guessing with all the harbour redevelopment one probably needs to head into the housing and park near the playpark at Balnagask Circle?
Thanks
GB
Thanks Greybags.
Anywhere around Balnagask Circle would be fine.You can walk a loop and return to your car.
 

Mark Lew1s

My real name is Mark Lewis
If it's easier, there's plenty of parking on the hill down towards the new harbour (St Fittick's Road) and several places where you can get through the fence and down towards the ponds.

Good luck, it can be a very birdy area.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
It was a pleasant late autumn day for a wander round the patch. I began around St Fittick's. On the way down, I saw singles of Mistle Thrush, Redwing and Fieldfare. I flushed a Jack Snipe from the marsh, along with nine Common Snipe. Two Teal and at least 40 Siskins were also about and a Water Rail showed very well in the reeds from the concrete bridge.

The headland was fairly quiet in the afternoon. A Goldeneye and a Long-tailed Duck went north offshore.
 

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Cucurrucucu

Cucurrucucu
Supporter
a Water Rail showed very well in the reeds from the concrete bridge.
Heard a rail there too. And several hundred starlings flew over me at sunrise yesterday morning. Think they had been gathering on the cleared bit just beyond the concrete bridge. All migrants or do the local birds flock together this time of year?
My little video of the diving goldeneye made the cut in last week's Landline. 1636843191595.png Which was nice.
 

Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
Heard a rail there too. And several hundred starlings flew over me at sunrise yesterday morning. Think they had been gathering on the cleared bit just beyond the concrete bridge. All migrants or do the local birds flock together this time of year?
This afternoon, there were a few hundred Starlings going to roost in the marsh at St Fittick's, which is good to see. I would guess they're a mixture of local birds and migrants. They will all flock at this time of the year.

It was a pleasant, interesting day today, although there wasn't quite the influx of birds from the east that there seemed to be potential for. Two Snow Buntings appeared, rather peculiarly perching on the fence between Walker Park and the golf course. They then reappeared near the foghorn. In the same area, a Short-eared Owl flew overhead, being mobbed by crows. Presumably, it had just arrived in. Not too much was happening at sea, although three Sanderling and three Goldeneye went through. A couple of Redwings were around the Battery.

It's been a tricky start to the winter for fans of the Purple Sandpiper Totaliser. The birds don't seem to be roosting on Skate's Nose at all at the moment, which is making them harder to count. Today, there was some progress with birds roosting on the breakwater and in Greyhope Bay:

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Let's hope there's some more purposeful action in the near future.

A wander round St Fittick's in the afternoon produced nice views of a Jack Snipe in the marsh. A Common Snipe was seen on the ground there too. A Water Rail showed well at dusk along the Tullos Burn.
 

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Andrew Whitehouse

Professor of Listening
Staff member
Supporter
Scotland
I had a walk around the headland this afternoon, in mild and tranquil conditions. Of most note was an adult Puffin, not far offshore from the foghorn. A Common Scoter was also on the sea, as were six Red-throated Divers. The one pictured was in the harbour. A couple of Dunlin were the first for a while.
 

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ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Colombia

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