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Birds named after rivers (1 Viewer)

Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
Chubut Steamer Duck

This is another state or river conundrum

Dja River Scrub Warbler
 
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Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
But a lot of the other things, I wouldn't even recognize these things are rivers: Pechora, one of the longest rivers in Europe - never heard of it!
Must admit, I'm very surprised, given how well-travelled you are!

Some great travelogue reading for you: Seebohm, To the Pechora Valley and The Yenesei (issued together in 1901 as The Birds of Siberia). Available on BHL for reading online or downloading.
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
Must admit, I'm very surprised, given how well-travelled you are!

Some great travelogue reading for you: Seebohm, To the Pechora Valley and The Yenesei (issued together in 1901 as The Birds of Siberia). Available on BHL for reading online or downloading.

Is he the same guy who wrote that great survival guide to modern warfare: Seebohm, Run ?


.
 
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RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
I am afraid that Rio de Janeiro is not a river though, "rio" is also used for an estuary (see Rio de la Plata) and there doesn't seem to be a prominent river there?

Rio de Janeiro refers to the bay or inlet (not an estuary); "rio" formerly had other meanings in Portuguese, besides river.
 

JWN Andrewes

Poor Judge of Pasta.
The Ring-billed Gull was named after the Delaware River, the Ural Owl after the mountains. I mention the more generalised River Warbler, River Tern, Riverbank Warbler, Fly River Grassbird, African River Martin. A quick find through my Key MS found at least 150 scientific toponyms based on rivers (e.g. abariensis, aicora, alligator, angarensis, athensis, ...). Many are now treated in synonymy. A surprising number are very obscure rivers in Australia and New Guinea, others have a more classical ring (e.g. Tanysiptera kingfishers named for ancient river-gods), but some will be familiar (beema, nilotica).

Fly River Grassbird refers to a specific river, the Fly River, in Papua New Guinea.
 

Paul Clapham

Well-known member
Some great travelogue reading for you: Seebohm, To the Pechora Valley and The Yenesei (issued together in 1901 as The Birds of Siberia). Available on BHL for reading online or downloading.

Thanks for the link, I'm reading the book now. Had to laugh at the picture of them struggling with their seven-foot-long "snow-shoes" (which are actually skis).
 

jurek

Well-known member
Some exotic-sounding ones:
Luapula Cisticola
Dja River Warbler
Orinoco Softtail

Waterfall Swift - admissable on basis that a waterfall is by default a part of a river

Canyon Wren is named after an ex-river. :king:

Fly River Grassbird refers to a specific river, the Fly River, in Papua New Guinea.

It is the largest river in Australasia by volume but it is relatively unknown. Just like the highest mountain in Australasia is Carstensz Pyramid not Mount Kosciuszko. I wonder if any BirdForumer was there, and maybe saw the Grassbird?
 

Nutcracker

Stop Brexit!
Thanks for the link, I'm reading the book now. Had to laugh at the picture of them struggling with their seven-foot-long "snow-shoes" (which are actually skis).
Aye, it's a great pair of books! Have you got to the double glazing yet, and the ice breakup on the Yenesey? Incredible - something I'd really like to see!


Some idea of what this pressure must have been may be realised by the fact that a part of the river a thousand miles long, beginning with a width of two miles, and ending with a width of six miles, covered over with three feet of ice. upon which was lying six feet of snow, was broken up at the rate of a hundred miles a day. Many obstacles could cause a temporary stoppage in the break-up of the ice — a sudden bend in the river, a group of islands, or a narrower place where the ice might jam. But the pressure from behind was an ever-increasing one. Although the river frequently fell for a few hours, it was constantly rising on the whole, and in ten days the rise where we were stationed was seventy feet.


On several occasions we stood on the banks of the river for hours, transfixed with astonishment, staring aghast at icebergs, twenty to thirty feet high, driven down the river at a speed of from ten to twenty miles an hour.
:eek!: :eek!: :eek!:
 

cajanuma

Well-known member
And Madeira Parakeet

Also, Tapajos Hermit.

A few more Amazon river tributaries, or tributaries of Amazon tributaries:

Xingu Scale-backed Antbird
Napo Sabrewing
Jurua Woodcreeper
Purus Jacamar
Caquetà Seedeater
Maranon Thrush
Huallaga Tanager
Araguaia Spinetail

Awaiting splits/description: 'Mantaro' Wren, 'Beni' Softtail

And yes, Stygian Owl wins hands down!
 

Jeff Hopkins

Just another...observer
United States
Wow, this is more fun to read than expected. Jurek obviously wins the day with river Styx, that is just the perfect response :) But a lot of the other things, I wouldn't even recognize these things are rivers: Pechora, on of the longest rivers in Europe - never heard of it! - Baudo, Cauca ...

I am afraid that Rio de Janeiro is not a river though, "rio" is also used for an estuary (see Rio de la Plata) and there doesn't seem to be a prominent river there?

As I understand it, the European "discoverers" thought it was a river and named it as such, but in fact it was the entry to Guanabara Bay.
 
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