Birds named after rivers (1 Viewer)

Paul Clapham

Well-known member
Aye, it's a great pair of books! Have you got to the double glazing yet, and the ice breakup on the Yenesey? Incredible - something I'd really like to see!

No, I'm still in the first book. It really requires a trigger warning though, as they seem to spend much of their time shooting birds.

If you want to see spring breakup on the Yenisei, best to go soon. The date of spring breakup in Dawson City on the Yukon River is getting earlier every year and the breakup is less and less exciting. I don't know if it's easier to get to Dawson City or Krasnoyarsk.

From breakup to 'fake-up'
 

RafaelMatias

Unknown member
Portugal
As I understand it, the European "discoverers" thought it was a river and named it as such, but in fact it was the entry to Guanabara Bay.
As per my post #46
"Rio" was a word used both for river, inlet and bay, there was no clear nomenclatural distinction at the time. "Ria" is still used in places, both in Portugal and places in Spain (Galicia) with such sense. They clearly had more than enough time to verify there obviously was no "river", as in fact they were mapping the area (putting places in the map would be a better description than "to discover", in the same way as "describing new species" is better than "discovering new species"). So that's really a popular, yet clearly implausible, explanation for the name's origin, one that has been dismissed several times.
 

opisska

Jan Ebr
Poland
A few more Amazon river tributaries, or tributaries of Amazon tributaries:

Xingu Scale-backed Antbird
Napo Sabrewing
Jurua Woodcreeper
Purus Jacamar
Caquetà Seedeater
Maranon Thrush
Huallaga Tanager
Araguaia Spinetail

Awaiting splits/description: 'Mantaro' Wren, 'Beni' Softtail

And yes, Stygian Owl wins hands down!

Here is my greatest shame as I have Napo Sabrewing, I rode boats on the river Napo, but did not realize it!!!
 

janvanderbrugge

Well-known member
quote dantheman, Cornwall:
Stygian Owl: is this where we discover those who amongst us enjoyed a more classical education?!

Could be, this one fits in here: athesiensis (Garrulus glandarius): Athesis = Latin for Adige, river in the Alps.

Europe might deserve a better ranking: danubialis (Falco), danuvii (Phalacrocorax carbo) for the Danube
rhenanus (Poecile montanus), rhenana (Tetrastes bonasia) for good old Father Rhine . . .

Here are some more "running water eponyms" for the lists:
gangeticus (Otus bakkamoena), gangetica (Prinia/Suya sylvarica) for the Ganges, India
ilensis (Acrocephalus, Podoces panderi), iliensis (Parus/poecile bokharensis): Ili River, Sinkiang, China
agusanae (Hypothymis helenae): Agusan River, Mindanao, Philippine Islands
aicora (Meliphaga montana): Aicora River, Terr.Papua
gascoynensis (Coracina): Gascoyne River, W Australia
abariensis (Pachysylvia, Planesticus fumigatus): Abary River, British Guyana
ivahensis (Crotophaga major): Rio Ivahy, Brazil (if that's a river, read Rafael's explanations, to Port. "rio")

There might be a few more; besides, I did not check the validity of bird or river names (might be obsolete).
Enjoy, sail or row along!
Jan van der Brugge
 

jurek

Well-known member
re Stygian Owl: is this where we discover those who amongst us enjoyed a more classical education?!

I wish I had. I must humbly say, that Greek Mythology was a book we were forced to read in a public primary school. ;)
 

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