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Bison coming to Kent (Merged Thread) (1 Viewer)

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
Oh, all right, not worth doing then.
John

:eek!:Calm down John

Where did I say it wasn’t worth doing? I was responding simply to you saying you would support reintroductions of these animals to end eg deer culling and ‘trophy hunting’. I was simply pointing out that wolves, wild boar etc would be culled too once numbers reached ‘unsustainable’ levels/conflict with human activity (not out of ‘persecution’ but management.) I didn’t say anything about persecution and certainly didn’t deserve such a vitriolic and presumptuous response from you imputing me with saying or meaning something I hadn’t.
 

Deb Burhinus

Used to be well known! 😎
Europe
John,
. I appreciate that some might view this as another well publicised gimmick but we have many instances of "unfamiliar" grazing animals that have been used as a means of natural management, as Deb highlighted
Regards.

Post #17 is the first contribution I’ve made to this thread. Am I now ‘highlighting’ things in my sleep? :-O
 

Sangahyando

Well-known member
It's all wrong, in a nutshell. Lets have Bison and Wild Boar across the whole of the New Forest not only to turn the earth and manage the trees but also to force dogs onto leads and make mountain-bikers a good deal more cautious - and get rid of the ponies, cattle and pigs; Beavers joining Otters in every catchment across Britain to slow water flow and build biodiversity; Wolves culling deer across the Scottish Highlands according to Darwin's principles instead of humans culling for trophies and the best, undiseased, healthiest venison.

John
As much as I like the idea of dog walkers and mountain-bikers getting "civilized" by the local wildlife, I don't think reintroducing wolves to Britain etc. will work.
There's only so much (terrestrial) wilderness you can have in a densely populated country, especially if said country is an island.
 

PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
Post #17 is the first contribution I’ve made to this thread. Am I now ‘highlighting’ things in my sleep? :-O

Either that or I'm eating too much cheese. Absolutely recall reading that such actions are "a management tool" in this thread. Mysteriously disappeared into the great ether. Ne'er mind.
 
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jurek

Well-known member
It would be good, indeed, if the Kent Wildlife Trust presented the bison on its own right, and the idea of people coexisting with large wild animals. Now they are treated a bit like fancy mowing machines. ;)

Large number of British tourists visit countries like the USA, Sweden or Poland and behave responsibly close to large wild mammals. So there is a hope that in future bison and other species will be reintroduced to Britain as truly wild.
 

david kelly

Drive-by Birder
So basically, it's not the same species which was once native to the UK. Isn't that a bit like introducing Tigers because there were once Lions?

Yes but both Lions and Tigers still exist, so you have that choice. The Steppe Bison is extinct, the wisent is the closest proxy. Lions existed in Europe until historical times, Alexander the Great hunted them in Macedonia in the 4th Century bce.

David
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Yes but both Lions and Tigers still exist, so you have that choice. The Steppe Bison is extinct, the wisent is the closest proxy. Lions existed in Europe until historical times, Alexander the Great hunted them in Macedonia in the 4th Century bce.

David

Lemmee see, Indian Elephant is the closest proxy for Steppe Mammoth..... ;)

John
 

jurek

Well-known member
It is possible that the European bison lived in Britain recently. Bison were hunted out in many parts of their range very early, in the Middle Ages or earlier. Therefore there are no surviving records or it is uncertain whether they mean bison, aurochs (wild cattle) or large domestic cattle. Bones of bison, too, are easily confused with aurochs or cattle bones, especially if archeologists did not specifically look for bison. It is rather confusing situation.
 

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